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Do B+ and/or GT prefer Black Cow Manure Casing Mix to? Some of my favorite times...


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#21 Redrock35

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Posted 19 July 2020 - 05:46 PM

The biggest benefit, from my perspective, of adding PH buffers like oyster shells is that it helps to stave of contamination... Our lovelies like to grow in a neutral environment when acidity is considered.. Them most common anaerobic competitors prefer acidic substrates... As your mycelium breaks down the nutrients in the substrate, the substrate gradually becomes more acidic.. By adding the oyster shells as  a PH  buffer, the substrate will remain more alkaline over a longer period of time, allowing your minions to do their thing!

Now, that is something I can use, mold has creeped in enough of my 1/2 pint jars (inoculation mishap on my part) and during a 3rd flush. I've used a mold isolation polymer (sodium polyacrylate ISP) and good old sunlight with limited success, I'm thinking adding oyster shells will help save me from having to use either next time. thanks again



#22 p2p

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Posted 19 July 2020 - 09:52 PM

 

The biggest benefit, from my perspective, of adding PH buffers like oyster shells is that it helps to stave of contamination... Our lovelies like to grow in a neutral environment when acidity is considered.. Them most common anaerobic competitors prefer acidic substrates... As your mycelium breaks down the nutrients in the substrate, the substrate gradually becomes more acidic.. By adding the oyster shells as  a PH  buffer, the substrate will remain more alkaline over a longer period of time, allowing your minions to do their thing!

Now, that is something I can use, mold has creeped in enough of my 1/2 pint jars (inoculation mishap on my part) and during a 3rd flush. I've used a mold isolation polymer (sodium polyacrylate ISP) and good old sunlight with limited success, I'm thinking adding oyster shells will help save me from having to use either next time. thanks again

 

 

Wouldn't it be better and easier to use granulated gypsum? It also works as a pH buffer, but it also dissolves easier over time and has additional minerals mushrooms love.

 

On the other hand, oyster shells would remain in the substrate like small stones, as they do not dissolve.



#23 PJammer24

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 09:30 AM

 

 

The biggest benefit, from my perspective, of adding PH buffers like oyster shells is that it helps to stave of contamination... Our lovelies like to grow in a neutral environment when acidity is considered.. Them most common anaerobic competitors prefer acidic substrates... As your mycelium breaks down the nutrients in the substrate, the substrate gradually becomes more acidic.. By adding the oyster shells as  a PH  buffer, the substrate will remain more alkaline over a longer period of time, allowing your minions to do their thing!

Now, that is something I can use, mold has creeped in enough of my 1/2 pint jars (inoculation mishap on my part) and during a 3rd flush. I've used a mold isolation polymer (sodium polyacrylate ISP) and good old sunlight with limited success, I'm thinking adding oyster shells will help save me from having to use either next time. thanks again

 

 

Wouldn't it be better and easier to use granulated gypsum? It also works as a pH buffer, but it also dissolves easier over time and has additional minerals mushrooms love.

 

On the other hand, oyster shells would remain in the substrate like small stones, as they do not dissolve.

 

i used gyp in my substrate and have used oyster shells in my casing layers... I think oyster shell can be prefered in the casing layer due to it providing a different kind of texture and allows for more air within the casing layer... I don't know the full benefits of using oyster shell opposed to gypsum, only that it is used... I do not use it with regularity and rarely do a casing layer at all since it is not needed with bulk substrates.


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#24 Redrock35

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 06:23 PM

As in plaster of paris, right? 

 

 

 

 

The biggest benefit, from my perspective, of adding PH buffers like oyster shells is that it helps to stave of contamination... Our lovelies like to grow in a neutral environment when acidity is considered.. Them most common anaerobic competitors prefer acidic substrates... As your mycelium breaks down the nutrients in the substrate, the substrate gradually becomes more acidic.. By adding the oyster shells as  a PH  buffer, the substrate will remain more alkaline over a longer period of time, allowing your minions to do their thing!

Now, that is something I can use, mold has creeped in enough of my 1/2 pint jars (inoculation mishap on my part) and during a 3rd flush. I've used a mold isolation polymer (sodium polyacrylate ISP) and good old sunlight with limited success, I'm thinking adding oyster shells will help save me from having to use either next time. thanks again

 

 

Wouldn't it be better and easier to use granulated gypsum? It also works as a pH buffer, but it also dissolves easier over time and has additional minerals mushrooms love.

 

On the other hand, oyster shells would remain in the substrate like small stones, as they do not dissolve.

 

i used gyp in my substrate and have used oyster shells in my casing layers... I think oyster shell can be prefered in the casing layer due to it providing a different kind of texture and allows for more air within the casing layer... I don't know the full benefits of using oyster shell opposed to gypsum, only that it is used... I do not use it with regularity and rarely do a casing layer at all since it is not needed with bulk substrates.

 

How much faster is it to do bulk substrate, from start to flush compared to doing a casing layer type?



#25 Microbe

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 05:13 PM

As in plaster of paris, right?



The biggest benefit, from my perspective, of adding PH buffers like oyster shells is that it helps to stave of contamination... Our lovelies like to grow in a neutral environment when acidity is considered.. Them most common anaerobic competitors prefer acidic substrates... As your mycelium breaks down the nutrients in the substrate, the substrate gradually becomes more acidic.. By adding the oyster shells as a PH buffer, the substrate will remain more alkaline over a longer period of time, allowing your minions to do their thing!

Now, that is something I can use, mold has creeped in enough of my 1/2 pint jars (inoculation mishap on my part) and during a 3rd flush. I've used a mold isolation polymer (sodium polyacrylate ISP) and good old sunlight with limited success, I'm thinking adding oyster shells will help save me from having to use either next time. thanks again
Wouldn't it be better and easier to use granulated gypsum? It also works as a pH buffer, but it also dissolves easier over time and has additional minerals mushrooms love.

On the other hand, oyster shells would remain in the substrate like small stones, as they do not dissolve.
i used gyp in my substrate and have used oyster shells in my casing layers... I think oyster shell can be prefered in the casing layer due to it providing a different kind of texture and allows for more air within the casing layer... I don't know the full benefits of using oyster shell opposed to gypsum, only that it is used... I do not use it with regularity and rarely do a casing layer at all since it is not needed with bulk substrates.
How much faster is it to do bulk substrate, from start to flush compared to doing a casing layer type?
Don't use Plaster of Paris as its chemical composition allows it to set up and get hard similar to drywall also called gypsum board. Get garden gypsum.

Assuming your talking about simply casing grains you might save a week.......maybe a little longer but you will see a yield loss that is very, very significant.

Edited by Microbe, 23 July 2020 - 05:13 PM.


#26 FunG

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 07:54 PM

You can use plaster of Paris, you just need to let it set and dry before crumbling. Every local nursery around me does not stock pelletlized garden gypsum, I've never been able to find it.

Another source of gypsum is sheet rock, you can buy panels of it at home depot for like 5 bucks.

#27 Microbe

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 08:28 PM

You can use plaster of Paris, you just need to let it set and dry before crumbling. Every local nursery around me does not stock pelletlized garden gypsum, I've never been able to find it.

Another source of gypsum is sheet rock, you can buy panels of it at home depot for like 5 bucks.

Not a single nursery around me sells it either but lowes has small 8 lb bags which goes a long way..... a very long way. Plaster of Paris expensive respectively plus the labor required to get it into a fine dust.......nah..... garden gypsum....if you can't get it locally then get it online.

Edited by Microbe, 23 July 2020 - 08:29 PM.


#28 Redrock35

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 10:48 PM

 

You can use plaster of Paris, you just need to let it set and dry before crumbling. Every local nursery around me does not stock pelletlized garden gypsum, I've never been able to find it.

Another source of gypsum is sheet rock, you can buy panels of it at home depot for like 5 bucks.

Not a single nursery around me sells it either but lowes has small 8 lb bags which goes a long way..... a very long way. Plaster of Paris expensive respectively plus the labor required to get it into a fine dust.......nah..... garden gypsum....if you can't get it locally then get it online.

 

Makes sense, much easier to buy garden gypsum. If there's such a yield loss,what's the draw to do it that way? Thanks



#29 Redrock35

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 11:43 AM

Will feed grade gypsum ( Calcium sulfate dihydrate) work?

You can use plaster of Paris, you just need to let it set and dry before crumbling. Every local nursery around me does not stock pelletlized garden gypsum, I've never been able to find it.
Another source of gypsum is sheet rock, you can buy panels of it at home depot for like 5 bucks.

Not a single nursery around me sells it either but lowes has small 8 lb bags which goes a long way..... a very long way. Plaster of Paris expensive respectively plus the labor required to get it into a fine dust.......nah..... garden gypsum....if you can't get it locally then get it online.


#30 Mycol

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 07:03 PM

Chunky oyster shells also help to break up the casing some too And let some air in . When I pick my flushes in the base of the best clusters are always oyster shells .

Edited by Mycol, 30 July 2020 - 07:03 PM.

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