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Artemisia alba cola - Wormwood


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#1 UnHeisenbug

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 04:43 AM

Hey everyone,

 

I found a small wormwood plant for sell at a botanical garden. Now I have a to figure how to care for it and make it bush out. I do not know much about the genus or its ethnobotantical use, so if anyone could chime in about how they would use wormwood as sacrament that would be awesome.

 

I know it's related to mugwort and sagebrush, so I wonder if anyone has any experience growing any of these varieties, propagating these varieties, and harvesting.

 

Thanks!


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#2 pharmer

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 07:44 AM

see if you can get Norman's attention. I'm pretty sure he was growing some years ago.


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#3 Skywatcher

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 08:46 AM

I presently have several varieties of wormwood growing. The Artemisia Absinthium is the one most well known for Absinthe, but all of them have medicinal properties.

Most are extremely hardy and drought tolerant. You would want to make sure it gets regular watering (not soggy) the first summer, but after they get established only occasional watering is necessary. Artemisia is also a good insect repellent, and not bothered by pests.

The wormwoods like full sun, or if you are in a desert climate, some mid-day partial shade is appreciated. I am in So. Cal so I have few nights at or below freezing in the winter, but I would guess these plants are hardy down to zone 4.

 

The medicinal properties increase in the plants with age. I would not consider harvesting any until the plant is at least two years old. Depending on what you had in mind, the article below might be useful to you.

 

https://www.healthyh...mwood-benefits/


Edited by Skywatcher, 09 August 2020 - 08:50 AM.

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#4 mushit

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 12:01 PM

I have some artemisia absinthium growing as well.  Very easy to care for.

 

A bit of trivia here:

- it was once used as a bittering for beer before hops were used, as it is a wicked bitter plant.

- The name wormwood comes from the plant being used as a very good way to rid oneself of worms in the gut.

- It is also great for a sore throat and cough caused by a cold or allergies.   Make a tea and sip away at it during the day.

- of course it is the main ingredient in Absinthe.



#5 UnHeisenbug

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 12:26 PM

The wormwoods like full sun, or if you are in a desert climate, some mid-day partial shade is appreciated. I am in So. Cal so I have few nights at or below freezing in the winter, but I would guess these plants are hardy down to zone 4.
 

I am in USDA zone 6, very mild autumns and winters. However, they are very wet and dark. I want to put it in the ground here shortly and I was not sure how tolerant it would be of the dampness ( lot's of parasitic fungi/molds to attack plants. )

 

 


The medicinal properties increase in the plants with age. I would not consider harvesting any until the plant is at least two years old.

 

I am not sure I'll be at my current residence in two years. Have you had any experience growing wormwood in a pot? I read somewhere it should be planted in the ground, but I'm not necessarily convinced . . .

 

I have not thought about it uses. I thought about using it as a dream potentiator

 

 

 

I have some artemisia absinthium growing as well.  Very easy to care for.

 

A bit of trivia here:

- it was once used as a bittering for beer before hops were used, as it is a wicked bitter plant.

- The name wormwood comes from the plant being used as a very good way to rid oneself of worms in the gut.

- It is also great for a sore throat and cough caused by a cold or allergies.   Make a tea and sip away at it during the day.

- of course it is the main ingredient in Absinthe.

Cool, I'm glad to see some love for such an interesting plant! For whatever reason, the variety I have has cola flavor. When I first find this thing I was like WTF is this plant! :tinfoil:

 

Thanks for the everyone!


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#6 Skywatcher

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 02:24 PM

I am in USDA zone 6, very mild autumns and winters. However, they are very wet and dark. I want to put it in the ground here shortly and I was not sure how tolerant it would be of the dampness ( lot's of parasitic fungi/molds to attack plants. )

 

I am not sure I'll be at my current residence in two years. Have you had any experience growing wormwood in a pot? I read somewhere it should be planted in the ground, but I'm not necessarily convinced . . .


 

I have grown some varieties like "Dusty Miller" in pots with other plants, and it was no problem. Because of your soggy winters, and the question of how long you might remain where you are, I think potted would offer a solution to both.

 

I would use a well draining potting mix that is not to rich, and a pretty good size pot that you would consider still movable. That way you can relocate the pot during wet season to a sheltered overhang where it won't stay wet. It also allows you to relocate without having to try to uproot an established plant and deal with the shock to the plant by doing so.
 


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#7 Norman

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 02:31 PM

Not all artemisias are wormwoods, it sounds like you have a variant if white sage that somehow has a cool cola flavor. More closely related to desert sage, artemisia tridentata, than wormwood. If it’s not bitter as hell its not wormwood. Still a useful medicine plant though. If I had some and were still distilling I’d try it in a batch of absinthe and see if the cola flavor came through.
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#8 UnHeisenbug

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 04:01 PM

 

I am in USDA zone 6, very mild autumns and winters. However, they are very wet and dark. I want to put it in the ground here shortly and I was not sure how tolerant it would be of the dampness ( lot's of parasitic fungi/molds to attack plants. )

 

I am not sure I'll be at my current residence in two years. Have you had any experience growing wormwood in a pot? I read somewhere it should be planted in the ground, but I'm not necessarily convinced . . .


 

I have grown some varieties like "Dusty Miller" in pots with other plants, and it was no problem. Because of your soggy winters, and the question of how long you might remain where you are, I think potted would offer a solution to both.

 

I would use a well draining potting mix that is not to rich, and a pretty good size pot that you would consider still movable. That way you can relocate the pot during wet season to a sheltered overhang where it won't stay wet. It also allows you to relocate without having to try to uproot an established plant and deal with the shock to the plant by doing so.
 

 

Thank you for your wisdom @skywatcher

 

 

Not all artemisias are wormwoods, it sounds like you have a variant if white sage that somehow has a cool cola flavor. More closely related to desert sage, artemisia tridentata, than wormwood. If it’s not bitter as hell its not wormwood. Still a useful medicine plant though. If I had some and were still distilling I’d try it in a batch of absinthe and see if the cola flavor came through.

Hey Norman, I attached pictures of what the label on my wormwood reads. The taxa is Artemisia alba Cola which seems to be a white wormwood. Atleast I found this  wiki articlle on Artemisia herbal-alba https://en.wikipedia...isia_herba-albaI had assumed they were the same. I have not given the plant a taste, but I will an report back.   

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#9 Norman

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 04:49 PM

You’re right, my mistake. The white sage I had in mind was salvia alba - a relative of culinary sage.
Yes what you have does look like a wormwood - a kind I hadn’t heard of. I’d only known of grand, petite, and pontica.
It should grow great in a pot or anywhere you put it really. I live in the Pacific Northwest with long dark rainy winters and it - artemisia absinthum - came back for me every year and self sowed to the point of being invasive.
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#10 mushit

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Posted 10 August 2020 - 01:08 PM

Yes it can become very invasive.

I just mow the excess down with the lawn mower. :thumbs_up2:


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#11 Severian

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Posted 23 August 2020 - 09:17 AM

ANTI PARASITES

 

Kill those motherfuckers

 

I make tea out of it, along with black walnut and some other things.


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