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Pressure cookers and Grain question


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#1 armorking1

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Posted 16 August 2020 - 12:40 PM

Just want to make my own rye grain jar. Does the pressure cookers at Walmart work... recommend or no?

Also I got this rye grain from a brewing company. I’m assuming I just needed it straight out the bag not some kind of process done to them!?

If you can drop me some good rye grain jar techs and jar port techs would help

Thanks.... I know I know it’s probably addressed elsewhere

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Edited by armorking1, 16 August 2020 - 12:41 PM.


#2 FunnyFarmer

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Posted 16 August 2020 - 01:01 PM

A pressure cooker is a pressure cooker. They have to be built to withstand the pressures involved. It all comes down to size for your needs. I was looking into them but I can't remember what size to look for, 18, 24qt??? The standard stove top unit is too small for anything except for very small batches. Quality comes into play over time too so figure that into your needs.



#3 Juthro

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Posted 16 August 2020 - 01:34 PM

All pressure cookers are not created equal.  The unit you show a picture of doesn't reach 15psi, nor do almost all of the electric 'insta pot' style cookers.  Your going to want to be able to reach 15psi if your going to work with grain.

 

I advise you get a pressure CANNER, as opposed to a cooker, they are larger and made specifically for canning jars, where pressure cookers are made to cook bulk food.  The larger stove top cookers can work, but they are small for myco work.

 

The Presto 22 quart canner has always been a good economical choice, but since the pandemic they have been harder to find.  I think that is likely true of most brands of canners. 


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#4 Arathu

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Posted 16 August 2020 - 01:57 PM

^^^^^^^^^^YEP^^^^^^^^^^

 

What Juthro said....but it's well worth the search....do your homework so you know what you're looking at/for and then....

 

Hit up the flea markets and yard sales, Goodwill and secondhand stores, especially out in the country........

 

It's a quest!

 

A


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#5 FunG

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Posted 16 August 2020 - 05:06 PM

Walmart also stocks AA's but they're special order and abit pricey if you check their website.

Mirro makes good PC's that reach 15psi, I've got one and it works great for grain spawn.
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#6 roscoe

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Posted 16 August 2020 - 08:47 PM

Walmart also stocks AA's but they're special order and abit pricey if you check their website.

Mirro makes good PC's that reach 15psi, I've got one and it works great for grain spawn.

I have never heard a myco bandit utter the words. . ."Boy I wish I never bought that AA cooker!"

 

Though I have heard a few say. . . "Why didn't I drop the cash on one of these sooner?!"


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#7 Juthro

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Posted 16 August 2020 - 09:19 PM

I love my AA 921  :wub:   It's the cadillac of home canners, and it does much more than myco work.

 

As a matter of fact, mine has 27 min left on a cycle right now.  I got 12 half pints of smoked pink salmon getting sealed up for winter time treats.  I love the fact that it makes things long term pantry stable without need of a freezer.

 


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#8 Juthro

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Posted 16 August 2020 - 09:31 PM

Walmart also stocks AA's but they're special order and abit pricey if you check their website.

Mirro makes good PC's that reach 15psi, I've got one and it works great for grain spawn.

I was going to give you a like, but I'm out for the day.

 

I agree about the Mirro canner, I got my brother a 22qt model for a gift a couple of years ago.  It holds exactly the same number of jars that my AA921 holds, but was one fifth the cost. 

 

I wish I had got myself one at the same time for a back up, as they were damn cheap at the time.  I got my bro's for like $53, they want over $100 for the same canner now, and that's if you can find one.  Pickings are slim right ATM.


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#9 Arathu

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Posted 21 August 2020 - 04:43 PM

I'm putting my AA 930 in the will.....extorting favors as a result while still alive...... :biggrin:

 

Ole age and treachery will .......... hahahaha 

 

If I fire up all four I can do like 32 quarts at a time.....but it makes the house REALLY hot...

 

Doctor called and said the arthritis is worse.....shit I coulda told him that.....wait I DID tell him that.....

 

Can I bill him?

 

A


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#10 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 23 August 2020 - 09:46 AM

Also only Merica has true 15 psi pressure cookers for sale. Most of us metric countries fall in around the 13-14 range even though they are advertised as 15.

 

I wouldn't fuss about it to much though, according to some graphs I found it equates to only one or two degree's temperature difference at full pressure.

 

Those multi pot one's have some low pressure rating's though. More around the 8-10 psi range, not what you want


Edited by flashingrooster, 23 August 2020 - 09:47 AM.


#11 Juthro

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Posted 23 August 2020 - 03:09 PM

Here is an article about the canning supply shortages, from the Washington Post 

https://www.washingt...other-supplies/

 

 

 

 

Haley Lancaster, a high school teacher in Vincennes, Ind., had always been intimidated by the idea of canning. She remembered her grandmother’s shelves lined with gleaming rows of giant jars full of beans and other vegetables, and the pressure cooker she used to fill them.

But with more time at home after the coronavirus shut down her school and all the other activities that kept her busy, Lancaster thought it suddenly seemed doable, maybe, in the way that we’re all trying things we never did before. Home schooling, DIY haircuts, TikTok dance challenges? Sure, we’re game.

[This reliable jam recipe will let you savor the best berries and stone fruit year-round]

She had already tried making sourdough bread, another home-cooking trend that flourished in the early days of the pandemic. And so she went online and learned, grabbed a few recipes — for water-bath canning, which doesn’t require a pressure canner like her grandmom used — and supplies at a local store. She made peach salsa that was a hit with friends and family.


“I felt like such an adult,” she says.

That led to a peach barbecue sauce (which was just okay, she admits), then pickled asparagus, dill cucumbers, and a batch of blackberry-sage jam, which earned a thumbs up from even her 5-year-old son, who likes it in his peanut butter sandwiches.

“It sounds so cliche, but the pandemic forced me to slow down my life,” she says. “I was always go-go-go with meetings and practices, and suddenly I had nowhere to go.”

Lancaster is just one of legions of canners these days stoking a new boom in the old-timey pursuit. Some are novices. Others are veterans, perhaps with a bit more time or produce on their hands these days. Canning websites and Facebook pages are hopping, and retailers around the country are reporting massive surges in sales of supplies.

[Here’s quarantine cooking advice from the original experts on thrifty meals: Home ec teachers]

And now, as late-summer harvests abound, the pandemic-fueled pastime is making it harder for people to find cans and lids, and there are reports of bare shelves on hardware and retail stores.


Glenda Ervin is the vice president of marketing for Lehman’s, the hardware company her father started in 1955 to supply the Amish community in Kidron, Ohio. Now there’s a new market for the kind of products it sells — such as gardening equipment, cast-iron pans, jigsaw puzzles and Mason jars — as people spending more time at home embrace lo-fi activities.

She says sales in the company’s canning category are up 600 percent over last year. Plenty of products, including those made by Ball, the country’s largest consumer manufacturer of canning jars and lids, are on back-order. In some cases, she says, they have what would ordinarily be a 10-year supply on order.

“Demand is through the roof,” Ervin says. She has seen spikes caused by traumatic national events before, like in the lead-up to Y2K, when people feared power-grid shutdowns and major disruptions, or after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. “But I’ve never seen something this large and this long,” she says.

Canning suppliers and retailers began predicting a surge when they saw the shortages that seed companies were experiencing early in the pandemic. The crops sown in the spring by newly isolated gardeners are now quite literally bearing fruit.

Still, the volume has taken some by surprise. When orders started flying in in April, Lisa Reinhart, an employee of the Fillmore Container Company in Lancaster, Pa., which sells bulk jars and accessories for canning and candle-making, wondered if it was a fluke.

“At the beginning, we wondered if it was something having to do with a Google algorithm,” she says. After weeks of sustained sales, it became clear that it wasn’t.

Reinhart says the first products to sell out were canning “flats,” the disc-shaped part of the two-part lid used by most canners. For water-bath canning, filled jars are sealed with the two-part lid and submerged in hot water. While jars and the ring part of the lid can be reused, the flat has to be new each time.

[Canning basics: What you need to get started]

Fillmore sells sleeves of them, but she is sold out of the standard size and has only some in the wide-mouth style available. All the Ball flats are back-ordered. “Our purchaser is trying to find some pockets from other manufacturers,” she says. “Unless we can find more, it won’t be until late fall that will be able to replace them.”

Newell Brands, which makes Ball and Kerr jars and lids, did not respond to our emails.

Reinhart notes that the run on Mason jars, which her company sources not just from Ball but also from other makers of generic jars, is being fueled not just by canners looking to line their pantries with pickles, but by plenty of other pandemic crafters. “There are all these crafty ways of using Mason jars in the pandemic,” she says. “People fill them with candles, and lots of restaurants are doing cocktails to go in jars, and there are the DIY [disinfecting] wipes.”

There’s evidence that canning in the pandemic is more than just a hobby for some. Sales of the all-American Pressure Cooker, the sturdy stove-top gadget used by many more serious canners to preserve meats and poultry as well as low-acid vegetables that aren’t suitable for the hot-bath method, are off the charts. The Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry, where the cooker has been in production since the 1930s, sold 14,000 units last year. They’ve already doubled that figure this year and have 23,000 more on order, the company reports.


Joel Andrew, the company’s president of consumer products, says he doesn’t see interest waning. “It’s been very interesting to see how many people are getting into prepping and homesteading — there are a lot of TV shows and homestead blogs,” he says. “That’s translating to our sales.”

A spike in pressure-cooker canning seems significant, says Marisa McClellan, the author who runs the Food in Jars blog. “That tells me that people are feeling insecure,” she says. “They’re not just looking to make fun jams and pickles, they’re thinking ‘the apocalypse is nigh, so I need to put up poultry.’”

McClellan says interest in her blog and Facebook page, where canners of all experience levels trade tips and photos, is up. And she estimates she gets almost two dozen messages a day from panicky canners looking for a supplier when they find their local store shelves bare.

She sees a range of reasons behind canning’s status as the newest pandemic craze: unexpected bumper crops from home gardens, maybe, or people with a bounty of fruits and veggies after visiting pick-your-own farms or farm markets. But she says there’s more than pure practicality at work.

Even if you’re not producing quantities that a farmer (or an End of Days-fearing prepper) would approve, canning at least offers people a small sense of security and being in control of their food-supply chain. “Even if it’s a dash of jam in your cabinet, it gives you a bit of that pioneer spirit — like, ‘okay, I’m set for the winter.’”

That’s just the kind of psychological boost that Lancaster, the home canner in Indiana, is getting from surveying her modest stash of jars. She said there have been shortages of various foods in her local grocery stores, particularly early on in the pandemic.


“I’m not going to solve that, but if I can do one little thing, it feels good,” she says.

She plans on keeping up her newfound hobby even once things get back to normal (and she has enough lids on hand to do it). She’s gotten hooked, it seems, on canning’s reward-to-time investment ratio.

“I did the jam and pickles on the same night in the time that I would have sat and watched Netflix,” she says. “And what did I get? Three pints of blackberry jam and four pints of pickles — not bad for an evening’s work.”

More from Voraciously:
The Goya boycott could impact the brand, experts say — just not the way you think
Everything is cake, except fondant hate, which is very real
Black chefs have overcome countless obstacles. This might be the hardest yet.

 



#12 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 09:14 AM

Reminds me of when you couldn't find yeast anywhere for a few months at the start of covid. Everyone was at home in the kitchen, exploring new things. I finally found some and had to order by phone and pickup outside the building. After paying and picking up the large bag I had a oh fuck moment. So when you said they come in 250 gram bags I was picturing 250 milligram bags. So I ordered four "packages"

 

I think I have enough yeast to last through the apocalypse now


Edited by flashingrooster, 24 August 2020 - 09:17 AM.

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#13 Moonless

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Posted 24 August 2020 - 11:01 AM

Yall might be surprised what an electric PC or instapot can do. I had a large electric PC that sucessfully cooked quart jars of popcorn, half pints of bird seed as well as pints, half pints and bags of brown rice. The device you have can definitely handle brown rice in all sizes of container but you will need to experiment if it can handle other whole grains.


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#14 Julianie

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Posted 26 August 2020 - 07:51 PM

Despite comments above my Instant Pot Ultra works just fine- never had a grain jar contaminate.

I can fit 4 pint jars or 2 pint and 2 quart with some careful arranging (the quart jars do rub on the bottom of lid).

For small minimono or dubtub its perfect. 

 

2 hours on high pressure, natural release overnight. 


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#15 PJammer24

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Posted 27 August 2020 - 02:39 PM

Your PC has to get up to 15psi as mentioned previously... You can get the largest Presto Canner, which can sterilize 10 jars at a time if you put three on their side on top of the bottom seven, and will run you around $80... $80 is pretty affordable when you consider the cost of All American units... If cost is no issue, AA units are the way to go... The largest AA units can accommodate around 21 jars if I am not mistaken... I have been running the presto units as of late but will have a large custom unit in the near future that can accommodate more and will have a timer and temp controller that will allow me to do other things and spend less time monitoring a canner on the stove...



#16 rockyfungus

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Posted 27 August 2020 - 02:49 PM

I started with an instant pot, and moved onto a PC because it couldn't handle any load.

That being say your PC probably reaches around 12psi. I always just added an extra 30-45 mins on the recommended times for sterilization at 15psi and never ran into any issues.

I still use my insta pot for slants/agar, grain can be done in baby jars or a few small jars.



#17 rockyfungus

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Posted 27 August 2020 - 02:50 PM

Reminds me of when you couldn't find yeast anywhere for a few months at the start of covid. Everyone was at home in the kitchen, exploring new things. I finally found some and had to order by phone and pickup outside the building. After paying and picking up the large bag I had a oh fuck moment. So when you said they come in 250 gram bags I was picturing 250 milligram bags. So I ordered four "packages"

 

I think I have enough yeast to last through the apocalypse now

Yeast is for non-bakers. I laughed at the yeast shortage and kept using my 10year old starter.



#18 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 04:58 PM

Brew me up some clean tasting cider with that starter dough and I would be impressed


Edited by flashingrooster, 28 August 2020 - 04:58 PM.


#19 rockyfungus

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 07:02 PM

Good call! Be a bit chunky, I can make a hooch.



#20 Juthro

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Posted 28 August 2020 - 08:05 PM

LOL, I'm familiar with sourdough starter hooch, and it does not count as a clean tasting drink....  :sleep:  :bat:

 

I like sourdough as much as the next guy, but commercial yeast has its place, IMO anyway.


Edited by Juthro, 28 August 2020 - 10:53 PM.

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