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#1 Mycol

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 03:32 PM

Fellow myconauts I have a few questions and I am sure we will find more as we go down this path . I am moving my research to a new location with an unfinished basement that I will be taking over .

I have never had a basement before, let alone used a basement to grow anything in . It is unfinished and in need of some cleaning . It has a concrete floor and a the ceiling is just the floorboards from the first floor. Lots of cobwebs and dust down there . A couple sump pumps. Furnace and water heater are down there so that could cause some heat issues . It’s got a door that I need to seal in so that I can minimize flying insects in there . It’s got a few windows too . I have a dehumidifier and will probably be upgrading that too .

Does anyone here use A basement similar to this or have experience they could share with me about problems that I might encounter and how to manage them ?

I’m going to get a UV lint that has a sticky trap on the back behind the bulb to trap bugs . I’ve got a portable ac unit that I can use down there too to keep it cool .

Thanks in advance Mycotopia

Edited by Mycol, 08 September 2020 - 03:38 PM.


#2 onediadem

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 07:24 PM

UV lights are not something I would recommend running for periods of time. Be very careful with them and do some research. Your best bet in a basement would be to build a structure that you can fully encapsulate in plastic sheeting. You can make some pretty awesome ones with 1x2's or 1x4's then cover in decent visqueen, or buy grow tents. And use a pond fogger for humidity. That keeps your grow and your basement safe from moisture damage.

 

Like this..

 

https://www.amazon.c...2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

 

or if you have the money..

https://www.amazon.c...aps,227&sr=8-53

 

And the plastic..

https://www.amazon.c...tag=googhydr-20


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#3 Mycol

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Posted 08 September 2020 - 09:13 PM

I’ll have to get a hygrometer to measure my humidity .

I guess I should’ve clarified what I intend to grow and how .

I’ve been doing monotubs with good success . So my humidity levels should be ok in the tub . I was more worried the humidity levels outside of the tub being gnome low enough to draw humidity out of the tub to stimulate pinning .

#4 TVCasualty

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Posted 09 September 2020 - 11:23 AM

I'm guessing the "UV" light is just a "blacklight" type to attract bugs and is not a germicidal light, but it's important to know for sure so you don't give yourself cataracts or skin cancer.

 

One thing that will give you a huge advantage in a basement is if you can figure out how to rig a HEPA filter to draw air in from outside the space (the room upstairs would work), HEPA filter it, then blow it into the basement room to create a positive-pressure lab space that will keep the airborne contaminants out (of which basements have a lot, being the lowest space in the house). Don't forget to leave a space near the floor with a very fine mesh screen over it for the air to escape (be sure the exit duct or hole is small enough to ensure the room is pressurized, which just means more air is pumped into it than can escape at the same rate).

 

I set up a system like that and it worked amazingly well (lower contam rates than a regular upstairs bedroom without positive pressure). I'd also painted the masonry walls with a fresh coat of white masonry paint, sealed the floor with gray epoxy paint, and covered all the wood with plastic panels. Don't insulate the spaces between the joists if you enclose them in plastic panels or sheeting (it causes problems later). You can also clean all the exposed wood, seal up all the gaps with caulk or expanding foam, and paint them with a few coats of white paint instead of adding paneling. In my case I covered the ceiling with FRP, which worked but was a nightmare to install and one of the more expensive (but permanent) options. It looks like shit since it's like tacking a very heavy wet noodle to the ceiling, but it's a basement grow space no one else is supposed to see.

 

To save yourself the trouble of a basement renovation (which you probably wouldn't want to do in a rental property; you didn't specify if it's owned or rented which makes a difference in how to approach it) you can build a room within the space with PVC pipe and fittings and enclosed in plastic sheeting. If you have the space you might consider making two PVC rooms, one for the lab and one for fruiting (both with positive pressure air filtration).

 

I guess all this is to say that what to do will be determined by whether it's owned or rented, your goals in terms of output, and your budget.


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#5 Mycol

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 09:26 AM

I’ll own this one so I can make it look like a diy versus a pro remodel . I’d kind of thought about framing with some pvc and getting the poly sheeting to cover it didn’t think about using a hepa filter to make the frame a positive pressure box but that’s a good idea .

How big of a hepa filter would you need to make your whole basement a positive pressured space ? Mine is pretty big at least 800 square feet . Thanks TVCasualty

#6 TVCasualty

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 10:28 AM

In my case I just added a duct to my first flow hood (the smallest one Stamets sells) and used that to pressurize the room:

 

post-102948-0-20297500-1561304422.jpg

 

The air is being drawn into the flow hood from the occupied space of the house upstairs. I had to get creative in making an intake that was stealthy while also being large enough to prevent the air from making too much noise as it was being sucked into the duct. There would sometimes be people in the house who could not know about what was up in the basement.

 

That was overkill for the space (~300 sq. ft.), and a much smaller fan/filter setup would work since all you need to do is ensure air flows from inside the room out (it doesn't need to be high pressure, just positive). I'm mostly winging it with this stuff, so I'm not really sure how much volume and pressure is enough; if there's a slight breeze flowing out under the door of the lab it'll keep out airborne contaminants but if it's more like a strong wind then it might keep out gnats and flies as well.

 

A few more details about the setup pictured above: https://mycotopia.ne...-2#entry1409835


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#7 Mycol

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Posted 13 September 2020 - 08:31 PM

Just got back from dropping off a load of stuff to the new spot. One room in the basement looks kind of finished . The ceiling is done and the walls have masonry paint on them . I will probably do the floors with that gray epoxy paint .

It should work out well if used an upstairs room to inoculate my sub And incubate, Case then they’d be colonized and have the lids on them when I brought them Down to that room to fruit . It works in my head at least ?

#8 TVCasualty

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 09:14 AM

That's a good plan assuming the room upstairs is clean.

 

Ideally we'd have the lab space and the growing/fruiting space in separate buildings, or separate rooms if that's not possible. But the vast majority of us have to do both in the same room, which makes having good technique essential. I'd guess that we learn faster when forced to do everything in one room since mistakes become apparent real fast.

 

If you can install a positive-pressure HEPA air filtering system for your lab space in the basement then that would be superior to an upstairs room that doesn't have one (IMO). This doesn't require a laminar flow hood, just HEPA-level filtration so it can be built for less than a hood. I just used my old one (which was overkill) since all I had to do was mount it on the wall, add a duct, and plug it in. If making one from scratch I'd use a much smaller filter element and blower since all it needs to do is maintain a slight flow of air out of the room (it's only "pressurized" in a technical sense).


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#9 Mycol

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 01:52 PM

Thanks for the input TV, really appreciated .

I’m going back In a few days and I’m getting a clearer visions each time , I’m pretty sure I could rig one of my store bought hepa units to draw air from upstairs and exhaust it into the room with some rigging . It’ll be a couple months before in can start that project but it’s good to flesh these ideas out ahead of time .
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