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Outdoor Cubes after 2 days of snow


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#1 rockyfungus

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 12:51 PM

Really really confused and didn't expect this.

We've had 90 degree weather most of the summer with minimal rain. I've been seldomly able to get my outdoor patch to fruit with tons of water and humidity domes.

Decided to call it a season because the snow started, checked my patch this morning and saw fresh cubes a day to two from being mature, and the last flush was blue/black from the cold.

Anyone expecting these to mature and fruit? It was for the past 3 days, high 20's, mid 30's, and now the 40's. Should be approaching 70's tomorrow.

Maybe I stumbled upon a cold-hearty cube?

Anyways if anyone is curious I'll keep this updated.

outdoorcub2.png

patch fruited a week ago and lack of humidity got to it (few nice fruits cloned/printed)

 

outdcub1.png

snow-cubes, can see the outer 2 most of got too cold.


Edited by rockyfungus, 10 September 2020 - 12:58 PM.

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#2 TVCasualty

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 04:48 PM

That's pretty cool!

 

No pun intended.

 

I guess the ground temperature is still warm enough to keep them going even if the air gets cold temporarily. A few years ago it snowed where I lived in late-Spring and the next day warmed up so fast that I saw a butterfly flying around and a spider on the 2 inches of snow that was still on the ground. I'd never seen insects walking over snow before (and haven't since), which I guess was the opposite of what happened with your mushrooms.



#3 rockyfungus

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Posted 10 September 2020 - 05:10 PM

Haha, speaking about insects. I did catch a daddy long legs in some of my cacti that I moved back indoors.

Maybe the humidity dome was able to keep the temperatures warm enough. Either way didn't really expect cubes the day after snow melted in 40s!

I wonder if this stress makes them more potent like some plants.



#4 PJammer24

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 10:28 AM

Temperature changes can aid in the fruiting process... Whether it be a survival mechanism that when the temps drop they fruit to ensure spore production for the next generation or if it has something to do with weather changes and temperature drops during a storm followed by warmer, evaporation inducing temps, cold shocks are believed to induce fruiting...

 

The fact that it snowed makes this a bit more of a cold shock than what one would induce artificially or would be induced by your typical weather patterns but super cool none the less... I think the ground temperature, as mentioned, has helped to maintain viability.



#5 rockyfungus

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 01:05 PM

No noticeable growth today, and the temperatures are 50's approaching 70 by afternoon. I'll maybe post an update pic when I get home from work.

Very cool info PJ


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#6 Jrotten

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 01:36 PM

Realistically from the photo it looks like the actual myc bed is an inch or so down.  It probably didn't feel the cold until it actually got above the ground and the snow would likely be a slow melt.  I happen to live in a place where we get a lot of freezing rain, but it's almost always a quick temperature change like that so only things like overpasses or trees ever really freeze.  The ground temperature takes a little while to drop.



#7 rockyfungus

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Posted 11 September 2020 - 02:00 PM

Yeah my greenhouse with a temperature/humidity gauge showed it never technically dipped below 45ish. I live at elevation so you can snow with an air temperature in the 50's. Though it was a , miserable 30's for a few days.

 

Cool! Wish I could of gotten a picture with snow and them poking out.

I live in an arid alpine desert, so these things are a bitch inside and outside, never figured out a way not to have to spray multiple times a day. (time for a martha)



#8 rockyfungus

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Posted 12 September 2020 - 12:22 PM

So everything aborted and one lone cube fruited. It instantly opened up too and was super tiny. I threw it on some rich compost to see if it will drop spores and colonize.


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#9 TVCasualty

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 11:30 AM

cold shocks are believed to induce fruiting...

 

That is only applicable to non-tropical species. Cubensis does not benefit from cold shocking. All it does is slow things down a bit.

 

Some temperate species are pretty hardy...

 

ice_mushroom.jpg


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#10 TVCasualty

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 11:39 AM

I live in an arid alpine desert, so these things are a bitch inside and outside, never figured out a way not to have to spray multiple times a day. (time for a martha)

 

The good news about living there is that it's a much more forgiving climate to grow in in terms of contamination risks vs. a climate that's usually or always humid.



#11 rockyfungus

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Posted 15 September 2020 - 03:04 PM

Yeah noticed I can get away with bad habits without contaminants. Humid climates most have so much more spores and things sticking along to the water in the air.

Hardly clean my SAB, definitely had agar plates accidentally open to air without contaminating.






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