Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Random Crazy Outer Space Stuff


  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#1 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 25 September 2020 - 02:29 PM

Real or highly probable, that is. Which is why this is not in the Twilight Zone.
 
I thought it might be interesting to have a thread for posting random fascinating/mind-blowing/disturbing/intense/bizarre stuff we either know is real because we've observed it or else is very likely real even if it hasn't been directly observed yet. Space is a real trip.

To kick this off, and what inspired me to post this in the first place, was this article claiming (with evidence!) that parts of outer space can get you drunk.

 

Literally, because they contain massive clouds of alcohols, right here in our own galaxy! While "58 quadrillion miles" seems far away, that's only 10,000 light years so in a cosmic sense it's like a having a bar downstairs from our apartment. And "massive" is an understatement, though if you try to make a cocktail you need to make sure you draw from the ethanol cloud and not the methanol-and-other-stuff cloud...
 
 

 
There are Giant Clouds of Alcohol Floating in Space

 

Discovered in 1995 near the constellation Aquila, the cloud is 1000 times larger than the diameter of our solar system. It contains enough ethyl alcohol to fill 400 trillion trillion pints of beer. To down that much alcohol, every person on earth would have to drink 300,000 pints each day—for one billion years.

 

Sadly, for those of you planning an interstellar pub crawl, the cloud is 58 quadrillion miles away. It’s also a cocktail of 32 compounds, some of them as nasty as carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, and ammonia.

 

The galaxy has a second intergalactic liquor cabinet in the Sagittarius B2 Cloud (the bright, orange-red spot in the image above), which holds 10 billion billion billion liters of cosmic hooch. Most of it’s undrinkable, though. The cloud holds mostly methanol, the same alcohol in antifreeze and windshield washer fluid. Similarly, near the center of the Milky Way, a cloudy bridge of methanol surrounds a stellar nursery. The bridge of booze is 288 billion miles wide.

 

It wasn’t spilled after some Martian keg party.  As new stars heat up—formed as clouds of gas and dust collapse—ethyl alcohol can attach to specks of floating dust. As the dust moves toward the budding star, the alcohol heats, separates, and turns to gas. For astronomers, these alcohol clouds can be a telling clue into how our biggest stars form.

 

 

But wait, it gets weirder. But in a good way for a change, if somewhat surreal:

 

Before reading this article, if anyone asked me what the center of our galaxy smelled or tasted like I would not have suggested "raspberry-flavored rum." I'm not sure what I would have guessed, but a tasty cocktail would not have been it.

 

 

Now, if you’re wondering what these space spirits may taste or smell like, Sagittarius B2 has an answer. The cloud contains ethyl formate, an ester that helps give raspberries their taste—and reportedly smells like rum. It seems, then, that the center of our galaxy may taste and smell like raspberry-flavored rum.

 

 

 

 


  • Sidestreet, Arathu, Skywatcher and 3 others like this

#2 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 25 September 2020 - 02:29 PM

Another entry also suitable for the WTF? thread is this photo of what happens when a half-ounce (14 grams) piece of plastic is shot into a block of solid aluminum at 15,000 mph (or 24,000 kmh, which is just under Mach 20):

 

8NwAhgK.jpg

 

For scale the block of aluminum measures 12” x 12” x 4” thick (~30cm x 30cm x 10cm). The ISS is currently orbiting at ~17,500 mph/28,000 kph.

If a picture is worth a thousand words then that one says a lot about the threat posed by really small objects when encountered at really high velocities, which is a growing concern as we put more stuff (and people!) in orbit and develop weapons designed to destroy satellites (generally scattering a lot of high-velocity debris).

 

It doesn’t take much to ruin your day in space if the closing speed is sufficiently high. This could present a problem for aspiring Mars explorers and colonists as well as the ISS and our critical satellites.

Incidentally, the ISS has been struck multiple times by really tiny pieces of debris, resulting in damage. So were some of the Space Shuttles:

 

sts-118_debris_entry.jpg?quality=75&stri

Endeavour had a major impact on its radiator during STS-118. The entry hole is about 1⁄4 inch, and the exit hole is twice as large.

 

 

impact_chip.jpg?quality=75&strip=all&w=9

ESA astronaut Tim Peake took this photo from inside the International Space Station cupola last month, showing a 7 mm-diameter circular chip gouged out by the impact from a tiny piece of space debris, possibly a paint flake or small metal fragment no bigger than a few thousandths of a millimeter across. The background just shows the inky blackness of space.

 

 

 

space_debris_impact_on_space_shuttle_win

Beyond manmade threats from debris, there also risks from meteorites coming from space. For example, a micrometeoroid left this crater on the surface of Space Shuttle Challenger’s front window on STS-7.

 

 

Photos are from: https://qz.com/77351...-speeds-can-do/

 

Seeing a crack in your windshield IN SPACE would be really disconcerting. I wonder if their insurance will repair or replace it for free?


 


Edited by TVCasualty, 25 September 2020 - 02:35 PM.

  • Sidestreet, PJammer24, Skywatcher and 4 others like this

#3 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 25 September 2020 - 02:37 PM

Then there’s the very well-done videos on this channel that are good for testing the limits of your imagination.

 

For example:

[Direct Link]

 

[Direct Link]

 

This one is a ready-made apocalyptic science fiction story:

[Direct Link]

 

 

 


  • Skywatcher, ElPirana, makinbones69 and 2 others like this

#4 makinbones69

makinbones69

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,054 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 25 September 2020 - 08:13 PM

I cant stop wondering what they used to accelerate that ball of plastic. I've been thinking about it since I got off work so gd I'm asking.
  • coorsmikey likes this

#5 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 26 September 2020 - 07:51 AM

I cant stop wondering what they used to accelerate that ball of plastic. I've been thinking about it since I got off work so gd I'm asking.

 

A  Light-gas gun fired in a vacuum: https://en.wikipedia...i/Light-gas_gun

 

 

I want one for concealed carry!


  • Skywatcher, makinbones69 and FLASHINGROOSTER like this

#6 Skywatcher

Skywatcher

    Walk's between...

  • Moderator
  • 7,722 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 26 September 2020 - 08:49 AM

I want one for concealed carry!

Your going to need a magic wormhole purse  to get that thing in your pocket TV..........................

 

post-126525-0-85320300-1601128167.jpg

 

light gas gun.jpg
 


Edited by Skywatcher, 26 September 2020 - 08:50 AM.

  • TVCasualty, Arathu, ElPirana and 1 other like this

#7 makinbones69

makinbones69

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,054 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 26 September 2020 - 11:28 AM

Nice ty TV. I had something similar in my mind but wanted the details. Very cool. I thought it would have been bigger... haha
  • TVCasualty and Skywatcher like this

#8 JustinLokey

JustinLokey

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 70 posts

Posted 26 September 2020 - 02:25 PM

I am downloading all 9 seasons of  the X-Files so I should be able to speak coherently in about 9 months if I watch every one of them.

Also I know for a fact that  you should NEVER  use a proton drill on an alien artifact.  "just take my word for it"



#9 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 26 September 2020 - 05:38 PM


I want one for concealed carry!


Your going to need a magic wormhole purse  to get that thing in your pocket TV..........................
 

post-126525-0-85320300-1601128167.jpg




I use a sawed-off light-gas gun for that reason. It only gets up to 8000 mph, but that's usually enough.
  • Skywatcher likes this

#10 FLASHINGROOSTER

FLASHINGROOSTER

    Semi-Pro Taco Robot

  • Black VIP
  • 2,353 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 29 September 2020 - 07:35 PM

oldie but goodie

 

[Direct Link]



#11 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 20 December 2020 - 11:35 AM

The New History of the Milky Way
Over the past two years, astronomers have rewritten the story of our galaxy

 

https://www.quantama...y-way-20201215/
 
 This isn't really "crazy" outer space stuff but it's kind of amazing that we can track and determine the parallax of billions of stars (the data released on Dec. 3rd brings the total to just under 2 billion stars mapped).
 
 
The article even had a bit of comic relief:
 

The group named the incoming galaxy Gaia-Enceladus, after the Greek goddess Gaia — one of the primordial deities — and her Titan son Enceladus. Another team at the University of Cambridge independently discovered the galaxy around the same time, dubbing it the Sausage for its appearance in certain orbital charts.

 
I guess there will have to be a vote on whether the official name will end up being Gaia-Enceladus or The Sausage.

 

 

That's all well and good and people into collecting data are probably enjoying this a lot but in my opinion THIS is where it starts to get mind-blowing (it's one of the best animations of this kind of stuff I've seen):

 

[Direct Link]

 

Since the data is now so precise, that is an accurate representation of our solar system's local neighborhood. It is where we live relative to the rest of the galaxy. In light of that video, it looks to me like a significant barrier to interstellar travel will be navigation since the North Star is in space but there's no North Star in space. 

 

I don't think the animation was made with an intention of conveying a more intuitive understanding of the staggering enormity of astronomical distances but it happens to work really well for that, too. It's kind of wild to consider that the closest star to our Sun is ~4.2 light years away when looking at that blizzard of stars around us.


  • Baphom3t, Skywatcher, ElPirana and 1 other like this

#12 makinbones69

makinbones69

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,054 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 20 December 2020 - 01:15 PM

It may interest you that quantum entanglement was proven this year. Pretty gnarly its the o ly way I could see any of this working anyway. Check it out if u haven't though. Pretty wild. What u posted and the seeming impossibility of space made me want to share this with you. MICRO/MACRO verse is too much man.

https://www.extremet...um-entanglement

The ancient light off those stars is what allowed them to conduct the photon experiment. Its interesting man.

Edited by makinbones69, 20 December 2020 - 01:18 PM.

  • TVCasualty likes this

#13 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 20 December 2020 - 01:41 PM

That does appear to be a pretty big deal.

 

For Quantum entanglement to remain after four phase transitions means the entangled particles did not experience decoherence during the experiment, which (if I'm understanding all this correctly) has major implications for the development of quantum computers.

 

AFAIK, the vast majority of quantum phenomena experience decoherence as soon as anything macro-scale gets involved (such as a tool for measuring something about the system, i.e. an observer), and that would by definition preclude quantum processing because "decoherence" is the process by which a system shifts from being quantifiable via Quantum Mechanics to one that follows Classical laws of physics (shielding a Quantum processor from decoherence is one of the biggest engineering problems to overcome in the design of quantum computers).


  • makinbones69 likes this

#14 makinbones69

makinbones69

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,054 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 20 December 2020 - 02:14 PM

It does have much potential for the development of quantum computers absolutely. Its just real freaky because it means that the "butterfly effect" is a very real thing. Which makes quantum computer development scary for me to consider for too long of a stretch of time lol.
Imagine a particle malfunction in a processor taking out a chunk of the universe light years away. Thats a scary thought.

Sent from my SM-A515U1 using Tapatalk

Edited by makinbones69, 20 December 2020 - 02:14 PM.


#15 makinbones69

makinbones69

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,054 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 20 December 2020 - 02:17 PM

It also lends more weight to reality being in an unformed state until it is observed. Its a damn rabbit hole for sure.

Sent from my SM-A515U1 using Tapatalk

#16 makinbones69

makinbones69

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,054 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 26 December 2020 - 09:24 PM

https://youtu.be/Dq2_VfALKac
For u tv.
Juthro turned me onto the guy tho so. Funny tho lol

Edited by makinbones69, 26 December 2020 - 09:25 PM.

  • TVCasualty likes this

#17 makinbones69

makinbones69

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,054 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 26 December 2020 - 09:28 PM

Had a somewhat decent cell phone pic of them eclipsed planets last week. I posted in photography but as terrible as the pic is thought u may enjoy it. Looked much better in person. Was amazing to see man. Crazy space shit for sure.ffb5f43232692ef82c7a0795c91c3a72.jpg
  • Sidestreet and TVCasualty like this

#18 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 27 December 2020 - 02:34 PM

[Direct Link]


For u tv.
Juthro turned me onto the guy tho so. Funny tho lol

 

lol, reminds me of the style of They Might Be Giants.



#19 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,167 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 27 December 2020 - 03:17 PM

More interesting stuff:
 

The Weird Stuff That Lies Outside Our Solar System

That article contains a description of relative sizes of familiar objects as a way to compare to galaxy-scale distances:

 

But [the] exact nature [of the interstellar medium] just outside our solar system has been largely a mystery, principally because the Sun, all eight planets and a distant disc of debris known as the Kuiper Belt, are all contained within a giant protective bubble formed by the solar wind, known as the heliosphere. As the Sun and its surrounding planets hurtle through the galaxy, this bubble buffets against the interstellar medium like an invisible shield, keeping out the majority of harmful cosmic rays and other material.
 

 But its life-saving properties also make it more difficult to study what lies beyond the bubble. Even determining its size and shape is difficult from within.
 

“It's like you're inside your home and you want to know what it looks like. You have to go outside and take a look to really tell,” says Elena Provornikova, a postdoctoral researcher at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. “The only way to get an idea is to travel far away from the Sun, look back, and take an image from outside the heliosphere.”
 
This is no simple task. Compared to the whole of the Milky Way, our Solar System looks smaller than a grain of rice floating in the middle of the Pacific. And yet, the outer edge of the heliosphere is still so distant that it took more than 40 years for the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft to reach it as they flew from Earth.

 
 
That is a tiny fraction of the distances involved in the space between galaxies.
 
This is what fits inside our local grain of rice (I don't like that it's a logarithmic scale as that makes things look much closer to each other than they are):
 
post-102948-0-01317800-1609098902.jpeg
 
If Earth is 1" from the Sun in the image above then Saturn should be at or close to the edge of your monitor (if it's a big desktop type), the Oort Cloud would be 83 feet away (out in the yard, or maybe the neighbor's house or the apartment 4 doors down), and the outer edge of the Oort cloud would be ~1.6 miles away. And that's all inside a grain of rice floating in the Pacific Ocean. FWIW, α-Centauri is ~266,000 AU which would be ~4.2 miles from where Earth appears on your monitor (it's only about .1 ly further than Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our Sun). So our immediate next-door stellar neighbor is already further away than is intuitively conceivable.

 

The only science fiction movie I've ever seen that comes close to conveying the reality of space travel (or space travel mishaps, rather) without invoking magical technology to circumvent reality is Aniara (one of the more disturbing and unsettling cinematic visions I've ever seen. I can't say I liked it but I didn't get the impression that entertainment was the intent behind making it). And the ship in the movie was only trying to get to Mars! Cosmically-speaking that's like walking out to the mailbox!
 
 
When you think about that sort of relative scale (a grain of rice in the Pacific Ocean) in light of the video of the position of the closest 300,000+ stars (or grains of rice in the ocean) I posted above the idea of interstellar travel becomes laughable and Aniara is understood to be the psychological horror story that it ultimately is.

 

But as big as it all is, it all still fits inside our head!

 

  :meditate:

Attached Thumbnails

  • image2.jpeg

Edited by TVCasualty, 27 December 2020 - 03:18 PM.

  • Sidestreet and makinbones69 like this

#20 darci

darci

    snarky butt monkey

  • OG VIP
  • 1,317 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 27 December 2020 - 11:12 PM

My dad got me interested in science and astronomy when I was little. Loved it ever since.

The kinetic energy of a moving projectile is equal to 1/2 of its mass x velocity squared. It's the "squared" part that gets ya.

A car moving at 100 mph has 4x the energy it had at 50 mph. By the time you get moving thousands of miles an hour, impacts aren't collisions, they're explosions.

Which is why I become irked every time I see a sci-fi movie showing impacts in space (I'm thinking of you, "Gravity") or comets/meteors falling to the ground (Insert list of movies 100 miles long).

If a real object larger than 100 meters in diameter enters the atmosphere and reaches the ground, it doesn't move like a lump of smoky, burning coal across the sky, it will flash as blue and bright as a welding arc, turning a night sky into day as it streaks to the ground in a matter of a few seconds.

They say that the one that killed the dinosaurs was already 10,000 times as bright as the sun while it was still 15km high in the atmosphere. You would get a sunburn in about 1/40,000th of a second from the ultraviolet radiation before it hit, and anything beneath its approach would be vaporized from the LIGHT it emitted as if a nuclear explosion had gone off right over their heads. When it landed, you could see a flash of light at Earth's location with the naked eye from the distance of Jupiter's orbit.

In physical terms, it was a blast of about 100 million megatons. It would take over 6 billion of the nukes dropped on Hiroshima to come close.

To summarize, movies are fake.

=P

P.S. "Greenland" isn't a bad flick. Fake, but good. Saw it yesterday =)

Edited by darci, 27 December 2020 - 11:29 PM.

  • TVCasualty, coorsmikey, makinbones69 and 1 other like this




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!