Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Can anyone lend me your eyes and thoughts on a few different specimens?


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 10:57 AM

Hey everybody, I found this just outside my house by my shed the day before yesterday. It was lifting up a piece of firewood with it's cap. Is this a yellow amanita muscaria? IMG_20200926_163000309.jpg IMG_20200926_163005278.jpg
  • Arathu and ElPirana like this

#2 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:06 AM

Now yesterday, me and the family went into the surrounding woods to look for family friendly wild mush, I found these and my lady thought they were honeys but they are giant. Big as my face. Any idea's? I would love to eat them while there still fresh lol thanksIMG_20200927_165140354.jpg IMG_20200927_165118684.jpg
  • ElPirana likes this

#3 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,378 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:15 AM

Those are not armillaria (honey mushrooms).. I would not eat them...

 

The first photos look to be amanita of some type but it is hard to say which at this stage.


  • Arathu likes this

#4 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:18 AM

1601309478954470024239243429912.jpg 16013096929156531873644013000202.jpg here is a shot of the today, they have lightly browned a bit,since they've been picked.

#5 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 13,560 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:23 AM

Caps that are open all the way up are usually no longer good/palatable to eat. And it's generally advised to not consume fresh mushrooms in general, particularly from the wild (cook 'em in something).

 

Make sure that any wild fungi that you do eat has been identified to species with 100% certainty, and even then always leave a sample uncooked just in case (helps the doctors diagnose a potential poisoning if that becomes an issue).

 

And FWIW, those are definitely not Armillaria sp.


  • Arathu likes this

#6 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:26 AM

Here's some shots of my suspected amanitatop two were next to each other, middle group was under a tall row of pine up my driveway. Open one was in my back yard under some pine

#7 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:32 AM

We never eat any raw, always sauted or such. My ladies father is a big mushroom hunter, (well he very much enjoys the hobby) and we always verify with him our findings. But he was unsure. We did find quite a few clusters of verified honeys, nowhere near these large guys. but I forgot to snap a shot of them. They were cooked yesterday. We also got quite a few red bolete's.
  • TVCasualty likes this

#8 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:34 AM

16013108089046068589843673340948.jpg here's the missing pic from above

#9 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,378 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:35 AM

the honey's I find are long stemmed with small caps... these are not them.. There are multiple varieties in the Armillaria family that are edible and are called "honey" mushrooms by some but the ones in the photos do not resemble any of the ones I frequently forage.

 

The Amanitas are a different story. There are some edible amanitas and there are some deadly amanitas.... They are characterized, partially, by the universal veil or vulva from which they fruit, the remnants of which give the mushroom its "warts" or splotches on the cap... I am not well versed in the edible amanita varieties.



#10 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,378 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:37 AM

the bicolor boletes? There are edible boletes that are read, however, many of the ones that appear to be red are unpalatable...



#11 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:43 AM

The bolete's were quite good. Red with pores on the underside. Turn blue almost instantaneous when cut or broke. Peeled and cleaned we sauted them with some butter. Oh I forgot to mention my general area. Western nc, I can quite literally throw a rock and land on the Cherokee indian reservation.

#12 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,378 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 September 2020 - 11:59 AM

those are bi-color boletes unless I am mistaken... All boletes have pores on the undersides.. The bi-color are best eaten when they are a deep, brick red... If eaten when brighter red, there are often larva ingested..

 

 

There is a segment of the population who do not tolerate eating them very well... food for thought...



#13 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 12:05 PM

Well thank you everyone for your insight. I'm fairly new to hunting and welcome all comments. I would never ingest a wild without 100%verify. There are only a few I've selectively hunted, and I very much need to broaden my knowledge, with the great many types around these woods. My favorite by far are morels...

#14 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 12:09 PM

They were indeed brick red, and very meaty. Cut like a portabella. My lady commented that most she finds are mushy or soft. And was quite surprised to find they were quite firm and nice. Thanks for the info

#15 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,378 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 September 2020 - 12:17 PM

I prefer chanterelles and aborted entoloma to the morels in many cases, but that is just me.. A good oyster mushroom is right up my alley also...



#16 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 12:20 PM

Jammer, that's pretty much how I always find honeys to. When my lady said these big ones looked like them, I told her I've never heard of any looking like these. I'll just have to prepare myself with more info before my next hike. Thank you again for your insight.

#17 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 28 September 2020 - 12:22 PM

Oysters are also in my top list, lol a little butter garlic and some onion sauteed... I'm getting hungry

#18 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 13,560 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 September 2020 - 01:40 PM

The bolete's were quite good. Red with pores on the underside. Turn blue almost instantaneous when cut or broke. Peeled and cleaned we sauted them with some butter. Oh I forgot to mention my general area. Western nc, I can quite literally throw a rock and land on the Cherokee indian reservation.

 

When I lived on the border of TN and NC (~15 miles north of Georgia) I found a huge flush of Sparassis crispa that was the tastiest mushroom I've ever had (wild or cultivated). Sauteed in butter it had the taste and texture of lobster. Highly recommended.  :thumbs_up:



#19 Arathu

Arathu

    Dirtmaker

  • OG VIP
  • 6,353 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 28 September 2020 - 06:50 PM

Amanita muscaria var. guessowii

 

post-113856-0-95729500-1601336667.jpg

 

Very interesting mushroom but requires serious research and understanding.......

 

Seeing the pulling of all your pins out kinda makes my heart ache a little but as can be seen I have them popping here right now too......

 

Certainly NOT to be mistaken as residing in the same family and function as the psilocybin......beautiful to photograph as they grow and develop...

 

A

Attached Thumbnails

  • small_GEDC8300.jpg

  • PJammer24 and Boebs like this

#20 Nikecat85

Nikecat85

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 16 posts

Posted 29 September 2020 - 01:48 PM

I pulled those amanitas but there are a whole bunch more piping all over my yard. It seems they like to pop up under all the pines up my drive and along a fence that runs in my back yard. I'll wait til they open up before messing with them.
  • Arathu and Boebs like this




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!