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Honey-generated Liquid Culture Question


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#1 DarkPassenger

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 07:18 AM

Hello my myco-family!

I have inoculated two honey-based liquid cultures by first pressure cooking the honey and distilled water on high for 15 minutes. The mixture has a yellow tint and after inoculation, the LC continues to maintain a yellow tint but has the addition of very fine white particulate.

Should I be concerned that the honey carmalized, as I am not observing the typically illustrated large swaths of mycelium?

This morning I initiated another LC but pressure cooked the honey-water mixture on low pressure for 25 minutes. I am obviously doing this to determine if the results will be more typical to reported desirable mycelial growth.

Will my other 2 LCs successfully innoculate various mediums?

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

DP

#2 pastyoureyes

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 12:39 PM

You need to allow the mycelium some time to grow in there. Starts out as small spots. Do you have a marble or something in there to stir the LC.

I have never used honey so I cant answer honey specific questions.
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#3 FunG

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 05:47 PM

Natural honey is said to also contain natural occurring anti fungicides so it's not recommended for use according to some info I retained from another site.

But if it's that Billy bee honey or otherwise then it should work. I dont know what the difference between natural honey and that synthetic store bought stuff other then the obvious.

Maybe someone else can care to explain to us what the exact difference is in the composition that separates the natural honey from the cheap Billy bee stuff.

Powdered dextrose is the winning ingredient for liquid cultures fyi although the corn syrup works just as well, with the powdered you wont get crystalization of the sugars like you do with the syrup based dextrose.
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#4 DarkPassenger

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 09:40 PM

Pastyoureyes,

Appreciate your continued mentorship.

I have a magnetic stir bar inside. I am seeing plenty of white particles that I believe to be spore growth. It has been two weeks since innoculation though and I was expecting better results (more by now. Although I have been told I lack patience. :)

So at this junction I have 2 honey-based liquid cultures, created by the same organic honey. One that was pressure cooked on high and one that was pressure cooked on low for a longer period of time.

Finally, since I am overly methodical (and risky) by nature, I have just completed a 3rd LC using a combination of honey and corn dextrose sugar.

I had already pressure cooked a jar with honey and distilled water and instead of tossing it, I pulled it from the pressure cooker, unsealed it and added dextrose sugar. I then placed this concotion back in the pressure cooker, and cooked on low for 25 minutes.

Late tomorrow, I plan on innoculating this experimetal 3rd jar and I will be interested to see what happens.

My last experiment will be a LC with dextrose only. Aka the rubber match. A baseline if you will.

Look forward to your comments.

DP

#5 DarkPassenger

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 09:44 PM

FunG,

Great information. I will research the data on organic honey. It surprised me at first blush but it does sound logical... The anti-fungicidal properties that is.

I have only been on my "journey" for a short time but I am learning at an exponential rate.

Look forward to additional discussions.

Best,

DP

#6 Jrotten

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Posted 02 October 2020 - 12:32 PM

Honey in it’s natural form is a preservative that prevents bacterial and fungal growth. The addition of water changes that completely. This is why you don’t give raw honey to infants and to be safe any honey at all. It often contains botulism spores that can’t germinate on in the natural conditions, but in an infant’s slow gut process they can easily germinate and cause sickness. Once you dilute honey down to 4% or less of solution there is no real preservative function left.

Many complex compounds like malt extract for instance will seem to show more sediment in the LC after cooking if you don’t filter them first.
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#7 pastyoureyes

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Posted 02 October 2020 - 04:57 PM

We won't have any idea what if anything is growing in there until you innoculate cakes or whatever. If you have spots of growth that wasn't there after sterilization that's a good start. Starts out just a couple spots and especially with a magnetic stirrer it will start to look more like a snow globe. If you have lots of floaters already you can let it sit without stirring for a while and it will become more like a cotton ball sitting in the bottom of the container. I use a 3% solution of karo water PCd for 30 min if you want to try that out.
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#8 Dabluebonic

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Posted 04 October 2020 - 06:27 PM

Sorry to hijack this thread, but i use organic honey for my lc. My question is, Ive once read that adding a little agar to the solution would help the myc colonize more of the liquid. Is this true? I cannot find this information anywhere else on the web.

#9 DarkPassenger

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Posted 04 October 2020 - 07:19 PM

DBB,

No worries and interesting question. I unfortunately have no data on adding agar to LC. Perhaps one of the veterans on here can shed some light.




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