Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Dough as substrate


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 ShankMan

ShankMan

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 11 posts

Posted 24 December 2020 - 04:48 PM

Just a thought. Most bread dough is kept in a humid environment, about 80%, which is also ideal for mycelium.

 

Would it work to innoculate a ball or bowl of dough? Or would the dough just rot due to contams?



#2 Moonless

Moonless

    Mycotopiate

  • Black VIP
  • 919 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 24 December 2020 - 06:48 PM

What species are you going to try? I definitely think dough as a substrate would work but would take a long time to colonize because it is dense. I'm pretty sure, that if you cut the egg and oil from the dough, you could have great colonization using brown rice flour dough and vermiculite at a 1:2 ratio.


  • Myc likes this

#3 rockyfungus

rockyfungus

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 1,871 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 24 December 2020 - 10:42 PM

I wanted to try and use my sour dough culture. I go through a lot of it and it's just flour and water.

Nervous about natural yeast for one, and the consistency is very sticky (cut it with verm?)


Edited by rockyfungus, 24 December 2020 - 10:42 PM.


#4 Myc

Myc

    El Jardinero

  • App Administrator
  • 7,815 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 24 December 2020 - 10:51 PM

You'll need to kill-off the yeast through pasteurization and then loosen-up the dough mix with vermiculite or perlite for aeration.

Easier to build a brown rice flour cake with vermiculite. Fewer steps and no yeast to eliminate from the substrate.

 

Look into projects using Brewer's Spent Grains (BSG).



#5 TVCasualty

TVCasualty

    Embrace Your Damage

  • Moderator
  • 14,786 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 25 December 2020 - 12:17 PM

Just a thought. Most bread dough is kept in a humid environment, about 80%, which is also ideal for mycelium.

 

 

 

 

I disagree about 80% rH being ideal for mycelium.

 

Mycelium that's still colonizing a substrate needs to either be growing in/through the substrate (so rH is not a factor at that stage so long as the sub is properly hydrated) or if it's directly exposed to air needs to be kept at 95-100% rH as is the standard recommendation for fruiting cakes.

 

 

If you don't sterilize the dough it will contaminate spectacularly. But if you do then it will be "bread" (technically-speaking, sort of) since it will have been cooked, but it will still not work to produce mushrooms for reasons that become obvious with more growing experience. Until you have that experience, stick with established TEKs and follow them to the letter (so don't mess with any improvising or extrapolation or combining of methods).

 

That is the fastest way to being able to reliably craft experiments that are likely to succeed since they'll be based on tangible (hand's-on) knowledge and experience with how mycelium grows and fruits (and what makes cultures thrive).

 

A saying comes to mind: "In theory there's no difference between theory and practice. But in practice there's a difference."

 

I learned this the hard way, too. Most of us do, lol.


Edited by TVCasualty, 25 December 2020 - 12:19 PM.

  • Myc and rockyfungus like this

#6 rockyfungus

rockyfungus

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 1,871 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 26 December 2020 - 11:43 PM

You'll need to kill-off the yeast through pasteurization and then loosen-up the dough mix with vermiculite or perlite for aeration.

Easier to build a brown rice flour cake with vermiculite. Fewer steps and no yeast to eliminate from the substrate.

 

Look into projects using Brewer's Spent Grains (BSG).

Finally figured out how to use some weird malted grain, mixed with vermiculite. I'll be playing with different textures to see what's best.



#7 Myc

Myc

    El Jardinero

  • App Administrator
  • 7,815 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 27 December 2020 - 12:26 AM

I found that a 60/40%  - vermiculite to Spent Mash - was the best ratio.

Your results may vary but it's a starting point. I did manage to get at least three flushes with only dunking between flushes.

Dough would not be a viable substrate. Some reading of Stamets' work would be of great benefit to those who seek to deviate from the proven procedures.

There is a lot of room for experimentation but the ultimate goal of all of the best "teks" is to allow the home cultivator to obtain the most optimal results as cheaply as possible using only readily accessible materials which can be sourced locally. (Was that the run-on sentence of the ages or what? Somebody call Guiness.)


  • rockyfungus likes this




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!