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Best Article on Big-Picture Climate Change Yet Written


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#21 rockyfungus

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Posted 13 February 2021 - 05:44 PM

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#22 microscopeman

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Posted 15 April 2021 - 08:47 PM

And FWIW, we (meaning our species) do kind of suck pretty hard as a group.

I think you must have had something happen to you that made you feel that you need to be part of something greater and it gives you some type of power to attach to the manipulative brain worm being the real cause of what is wrong in the world. This is the mentality needed in order to latch on to such ideas.  I think you need a nice long spiritual myco session to rethink why you are here, why everyone is here, and heal your own inner spirit.  Free humanity is an amazing and caring future curator of the universe, just like our creator. We are very special, and the forces that seek to control and manipulate the curators, are doing nothing but damaging and destroying.

Since the beginning of humanity, people have been touting end of the world scenarios as a form of manipulation to control humanity.

The fact is, smart people over-analyzing various scenarios are being taken advantage of emotionally and spiritually to spread false cures, and false solutions.  If people actually believed this crap, they wouldn't be waiting for authority to tell them how to fix it.  The complete lack of praxiological understanding of the social order is what leads to these brain worms fixating on various control mechanisms, which, if they work, why aren't their advocates doing it now? Studies show, the most fanatical people latching on to this carbon fetish are those that pollute the worst. Meanwhile, private industry and their voluntary supporters are the only thing that could, or would be in the best position to fix any of these problems.  We need to get out of cronyism, not promote more of it, to fix the problems it already caused...

Government and authority do NOTHING to promote well-being.  Their only power is to create booms and busts, while destroying wealth.  If you understand what wealth actually is, then you would know that "saving the world from carbon" is a luxury that can only be properly curtailed through freedom, and wealth generation.  If you give that job to the government, the same forces that would be doing it to satisfy their customers, no longer need to satisfy anything but a government contract.  Promotion of any form of cronyism, is promotion to the destruction of humanity.

These are very niche areas of understanding, and this is why the majority of people watch their CNN and believe every little establishment article they see.

Lets just put it in prospective.  You want the people kill and jail others for growing a mushroom, to force the people to save the world through the destruction of wealth?  I'd suggest studying praxiology before listening to the false profits. Tune in and drop out man.  Don't be a shill. Own yourself!!! Make your own thoughts!

The only way to get out of mind control is to remove the inputs, and use your own inputs.

I love you anyway~~  :meditate:


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#23 jrh

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Posted 16 April 2021 - 10:06 AM

You should read a bunch of TVCasualty's posts to learn how to craft a well-informed, well-thought-out response that doesn't read like word vomit.



#24 TVCasualty

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Posted 16 April 2021 - 10:46 AM


I think you must have had something happen to you that made you feel that you need to be part of something greater and it gives you some type of power to attach to the manipulative brain worm being the real cause of what is wrong in the world. This is the mentality needed in order to latch on to such ideas. I think you need a nice long spiritual myco session to rethink why you are here, why everyone is here, and heal your own inner spirit. Free humanity is an amazing and caring future curator of the universe, just like our creator. We are very special, and the forces that seek to control and manipulate the curators, are doing nothing but damaging and destroying.

Since the beginning of humanity, people have been touting end of the world scenarios as a form of manipulation to control humanity.




Huh?

That’s a peculiar psychoanalysis of my comment. I don’t even know where to start with unpacking a “manipulative brain worm.” I might begin with who is doing the manipulating and why it seems to work so well on us …as a group!

And I did specify “as a group.” Individually, some of us are surprisingly tolerable.

As a group we are causing a mass extinction of other species on par with an asteroid impact through “development,” resource extraction, and habitat destruction (among other things). This may ultimately include us, too.

As a group we sure seem to love war and all that comes with it. But not dealing with humanitarian crises beyond doing the bare minimum or dismantling authoritarianism to help prevent them in the first place. As a group we tend to ignore those kind of problems unless they bother us personally.

As a group we are making plastic (micro and macro) ubiquitous in the environment (and in our and other animals’ bodies) which definitely isn’t great, and may ultimately prove to be really really bad (all indications suggest so).

As a group we have several opposing abstract political fictions squared-off and ready to nuke the fuck out of everything with very tangible weapons of mass destruction because as a species we’re so together and enlightened ’n’ stuff.

As a group we don’t ever seem to learn from our collective fuckups to slow the hell down so that our mistakes aren’t so big and costly.

Enlightenment and expanded consciousness don’t scale, apparently.

Heck, I’d settle for an incremental increase in sustainability and agreeableness at this point since we seem to be doubling-down on gearing up for WWIII and our ongoing war on the biosphere we can’t live without shows no sign of slowing down, and even seems to be accelerating.

Oh, and then there’s the carbon/climate change stuff and the resulting climate destabilization and rising sea level that we’re doing nothing substantive about. That might be a problem, too.


 

Free humanity is an amazing and caring future curator of the universe,

 
 
If that's the case then God help this Universe. Maybe God already has by making it real big? She'd be smart like that, I reckon.
 
So it could be that space is so big in order to act as a buffer and help contain messy test-species like humans so that we don't mess too much of the Universe up if our design proves flawed and we turn out to not be so special after all.

 
 
Has anyone asked the cetaceans what they think about all this stuff?
 
They seem smart enough to be able to answer our questions if we can ever evolve enough to figure out how to ask them. I bet they think they're just as special as we think we are. But they don't even have opposable thumbs, and never invented rope! They just swim around in a world more than twice as large as ours (Earth is 71% ocean) and check stuff out and have lots of guilt-free sex and basically enjoy themselves when not encountering humans. Who the fuck do they think they are?!?
 
This is their world, too (among millions of other species) but you wouldn't know it based on how we roll.
 
Maybe it's thinking we're so goddamned special that's ultimately the problem?
 
Why do we think that? Because we can? Any other reason? It seems to me that the belief that we are "special" is a persistent delusion that blinds us to the fact that we aren't, at least in the sense that we're not somehow separate from the ecosystem we came from.
 
To be "special" in this context is to be separate from the natural world. This perspective seems to encourage the delusion that we're somehow not subject to the consequences of the actions we take within this unimaginably complex closed system (i.e., the natural world) whose boundary conditions and feedback mechanisms and long-term cycles we have only just barely begun to understand.

 

I don't see how we can be "special" and so staggeringly ignorant simultaneously. An extraterrestrial might point out that the rest of the galaxy finds it hilarious that there's a planet overrun by semi-domesticated apes who are declaring their inherent specialness while literally and figuratively shitting in their own beds. Their take on Earth basically translates to "Bless their hearts..."
 
Maybe thinking that we're the opposite of special is how we're going to save ourselves (and the other species that are left) from ourselves?
 
I could make a good argument that phytoplankton is much more important than people as far as life on Earth is concerned. We are and will always be a mere subset of life since we're sitting on top of a huge stack of fundamental processes that are beyond our control and that we screw with at our existential peril.
 
It seems to me that humility would motivate proactive ecological sustainability much more so than delusions of cosmic relevance, if not grandeur.
 
Our species has just been really, really lucky.
 
Not special.
 
That's the main point of posting the article I used to start this thread.
 
We best start acting like it before the planet itself reminds us just how not-special we are since nature doesn't use diplomacy or rhetoric to get its points across. But nature does provide warnings if we're willing to look and listen. That's the other point of posting it. I hope we're not too special to listen. Time is not our friend in that regard.
 
 
 
 
 


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#25 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 16 April 2021 - 10:46 PM

 

Maybe it's thinking we're so goddamned special that's ultimately the problem?

 

I often think this, surely mans hubris has been one of our greatest detriments throughout history. Or was it the insane biological trick that ultimately lead to us being the dominant species on the planet. By killing and screwing our way into the future



#26 shiftingshadows

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 01:59 PM

...
We best start acting like it before the planet itself reminds us just how not-special we are since nature doesn't use diplomacy or rhetoric to get its points across. But nature does provide warnings if we're willing to look and listen. That's the other point of posting it. I hope we're not too special to listen. Time is not our friend in that regard.






Indeed it's not just climate change.There are good arguments that the tipping point was past awhile back. We are all numbed out to the constant threat of nuclear war, or we wouldn't function well. As has been said: "for those who feel life is a tragedy, but for those who think a comedy" - so one's appetite for all the grisly details may vary, if one has the appetite, this site maybe good for an overview: http://www.paulchefurka.ca/

Edited by shiftingshadows, 04 May 2021 - 02:00 PM.


#27 TVCasualty

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Posted 02 June 2021 - 09:29 AM

The great tragedy of the commons in beginning to unfold in earnest in the U.S.: https://www.nytimes....ught-bundy.html

 

Years of fucking up the West by mismanaging it under what I can only describe as a Redneckocracy has led to precisely what anyone with half a brain has been warning was coming for decades.

 

There will be a tiny bit of consolation in watching the cosplaying rancher welfare queens like the Bundy assholes get what they deserve as they slowly realize that they can't hold clouds at gunpoint and force them to rain.

 

At some point the Feds are probably going to push back against calls for violent take-overs and destruction of Federal lands and infrastructure that are being made (which are credible threats since it's happened before). The irony there being that Federal incompetence in the form of the BLM's approach to land "management" is what largely created the whole mess in the first place. So fuck the Bundys and fuck the BLM.

 

It will be interesting to see what happens after the gov't has to shoot a bunch of them, which seems inevitable at some point since none of these growing conflicts are solvable and all indications suggest they're only going to get worse. I don't imagine that parasites like the Bundy clan will accept equitable water rationing without a literal fight. And the local tribes are getting ready for one, too.

 

I suspect that we're in for another really interesting Summer.

 

 

 

 



#28 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 02 June 2021 - 05:58 PM

I remember watching a show where they were talking about water management in parts of California, in short it is along the lines of water issues in Vegas. There was none there to begin with. So over the decades man has started to change the landscape and shift water around to allow for development.  One particular part where they showed that one lake that had been drained due to over use. This caused massive dust storms to from off of the dry lake bed so in response they placed a ton of sprinklers and are now watering the dry lake bed to stop the dust......

 

As well there was some discussion about I think Ohio or Idaho wanting to tap into a major river that feeds other major cities downstream. They want to develop and have taken the stance that why should they suffer from underdevelopment simply because others beat them to the punch. We have golf courses to water too

 

Ah yeah we should be able to squeeze another six billions in before the population self corrects, well that's what the experts are saying anyway



#29 TVCasualty

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Posted 04 June 2021 - 10:15 AM

I have a suspicion that a lot of people are going to get a very rude awakening to the realities of global warming about 24 hours before they become part of what I imagine will eventually grow into large waves of American refugees migrating from areas where drought crosses a tipping point to wherever there is adequate fresh water.

 

They will not see it coming in time to do more than flee with whatever they can carry because most people don't appreciate how much the water sources they depend on depend on the stability of climate patterns that are rapidly destabilizing. We don't really have a way to distribute potable water to everyone in a major urban area if the conventional water system fails (which relies on having enough water available to allow the system to be pressurized). If the system pressure fails then whatever does make it through would need to be boiled to make it safe to drink. And forget about flushing toilets, so the human waste problem would become monumental real fast in any city that runs dry.

 

When it comes to the looming effects of global warming most people seem to be focused on things like melting ice sheets and sea-level rise and the resulting loss of coastal land (and expensive real estate!) but that's a slow-motion disaster that takes decades to unfold. A major water crisis only requires a season or two of precisely the kinds of exceptional droughts we're seeing happen in more places more often, and then all it takes is one precipitating event (so to speak) to start the dominoes tumbling and render a major city uninhabitable.

 

It can happen here, and it probably will sooner rather than later.



#30 ElPirana

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Posted 04 June 2021 - 02:54 PM

Humans are pretty good at destroying nature. But once we see that we’re making a mess of things, we (humans) seem to think we need to control things to fix nature. But we often mess that up too.

I posted this a while back in Rooster’s thread: https://mycotopia.ne...-9#entry1482714

It’s a video of how nature is reclaiming the Chernobyl area. And it’s a success story (as much as can be possible) simply done by leaving it alone! Makes me think that most of earth can probably regain its health if we humans could just let it be. I don’t mean creating national parks, etc, but to COMPLETELY let it be. Too bad people just can’t help themselves.

Tao Te Ching

39
In harmony with the Tao,
the sky is clear and spacious,
the earth is solid and full,
all creatures flourish together,
content with the way they are,
endlessly repeating themselves,
endlessly renewed.

When man interferes with the Tao,
the sky becomes filthy,
the earth becomes depleted,
the equilibrium crumbles,
creatures become extinct.

The Master views the parts with compassion,
because he understands the whole.
His constant practice is humility.
He doesn’t glitter like a jewel
but lets himself be shaped by the Tao,
as rugged and common as stone.


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#31 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 04 June 2021 - 03:18 PM

Canada just completed its border wall. Gotta keep that fresh water where it belongs, and those pesky illegal immigrant, cheeto dust eating Merican's out.

 

Rooster for premier 2056. :cool:

 

I mean where they heck am I going to get my almonds if California dries up. Time for change

 

But seriously yeah, this shit is not good. Crops don't grow so well without water. One of the more compelling arguments made for the  extinction of the Mayan civilization can be attributed to drought. Jungle cities with too many people to support, a few years of bad drought led the people to starvation and massive migration. They essentially melted into the surrounding civilizations in search of a better life. Forced to leave their no longer sustainable homeland.



#32 TVCasualty

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 09:06 AM

Nature's Warning Signal

Complex systems like ecological food webs, the brain, and the climate all give off a characteristic signal when disaster is around the corner.

...
The Peter Lake experiment demonstrated a well-known problem with complex systems: They are sensitive beasts. Just as when the Earth periodically plunges into an ice age, or when grasslands turn to desert, fisheries suddenly collapse, or a person slumps into a deep depression, systems can drift toward an invisible edge, where only a small change is needed to touch off a dramatic and often disastrous transformation. But systems that exhibit such “critical transitions” tend to be so complicated and riddled with feedback loops that experts cannot hope to calculate in advance where their tipping points lie—or how much additional tampering they can withstand before snapping irrevocably into a new state.

At Peter Lake, though, Carpenter and his team saw the critical transition coming. Rowing from trap to trap counting wriggling minnows and harvesting other data every day for three summers, the researchers captured the first field evidence of an early-warning signal that is theorized to arise in many complex systems as they drift toward their unknown points of no return.

The signal, a phenomenon called “critical slowing down,” is a lengthening of the time that a system takes to recover from small disturbances, such as a disease that reduces the minnow population, in the vicinity of a critical transition. It occurs because a system’s internal stabilizing forces—whatever they might be—become weaker near the point at which they suddenly propel the system toward a different state.

From: https://www.theatlan...-nature/421836/

 

 

 

 

At some point, knowing when a natural system is about to reach or has reached its existential Tripping Point might be a literal matter of life and death. And at the very least a better understanding of the dynamics of "critical slowing down" could help us determine where to most effectively allot our time, energy, and resources in the context of sustainability and environmental conservation.

 

So Chaos is fun (surf's up!) and interesting, and may even save our individual or collective ass some day, so long as we're paying close enough attention.

 

 

Oh well. It can only save us if we actually listen to those warnings. We don't seem to be doing that.

 

This is what "critical slowing down" looks like in the context of drought and recharging the aquifers we depend on for agriculture: https://www.theatlan...drought/619753/

 

I'd end up quoting the whole thing so I'm just posting the link to the article.

 

The tipping point for water in the region is imminent (within a few years, barring a major and vanishingly improbable miracle).  And that will lead to a tipping point for U.S. agriculture, which could very well begin an irreversible Domino Effect that ends our little game a decade sooner than I expected.

 

 

 

 


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#33 rockyfungus

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 10:19 AM

I'll give the article a deeper read later. We need to stop focusing on such a narrow scope of agriculture. Time to invest in better practices and less profit-driven motives. 

We pass these damn laws and the problems are reaching critical mass will have hit critical mass by the time the law goes into effect. It's getting grim and I'm almost trying to live a life of ignorance as it's too much burden for those that are listening. 

Water wars, sand wars, collapse of vital plankton from the fuel industry/government pushing plastic, guess I need to learn to eat more and enjoy reality tv.

 

https://oceanservice...ean-oxygen.html

https://www.bloomber...semiconductors/


Edited by rockyfungus, 18 August 2021 - 10:22 AM.

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#34 TVCasualty

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 07:08 PM

Another book worth a look if you want to understand the water situation in the southwest, esp. as far as Southern California and L.A. in particular are concerned then check out Cadillac Desert .

 

The blurb makes it sound like something hideously boring to read but it's actually not dry and tedious or whatever at all,and for me was a jaw-dropper on several levels. You should definitely check it out if you have any history in LA or the southwest in general. It's what first clued me in to what was coming, and what we're seeing is it. It came out in 1986. So it's not like we weren't warned.



#35 Tenderfoot

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 08:37 PM

Climate change or population change??  The population that the Hoover Dam/Lake Mead serves has quadrupled since 1930, thanks to the gubbamint that encouraged people to move to the Sun Belt (desert). 

 

Next!



#36 ElPirana

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 10:01 PM

Climate change or population change??  The population that the Hoover Dam/Lake Mead serves has quadrupled since 1930, thanks to the gubbamint that encouraged people to move to the Sun Belt (desert). 
 
Next!

I didn’t realize that climate change and population change were mutually exclusive.
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#37 Tenderfoot

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Posted 18 August 2021 - 10:37 PM

You learn something new every day!



#38 TVCasualty

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Posted 19 August 2021 - 08:19 AM

Climate change or population change??  The population that the Hoover Dam/Lake Mead serves has quadrupled since 1930, thanks to the gubbamint that encouraged people to move to the Sun Belt (desert). 

 

Next!

 

 

That's an easy one.

 

Climate change.

 

Specifically global warming caused by people. At this point denying a significant human causal element in our ongoing global warming is the science equivalent of arguing that the Earth is flat.

 

Once the population of Southern California grew past a mere 2 million it had already exceeded the region's natural carrying capacity for humans as far as fresh water was concerned.

 

The book I recommended pointed out how the Colorado River was divided up between CA and AZ in the most fucked up way possible (by absolute volume, based on a single measurement taken during a flood year, and totally ignoring Mexico). So the water policy for the Colorado was based on an assumption of it's annual flow that was ~120% larger than the average.

 

It looks like the water troubles in the Southwest have been a people problem the whole time (mostly manifesting through greed and incompetence), but like most stuff it's a lot more complicated than just more people living there. For one thing, the residential fresh water consumption in California and the desert Southwest is only a small fraction of the total water consumption. The vast majority goes to questionable agricultural practices, like planting almonds in such an arid region, or cotton for that matter (cotton is extremely water-intensive and the only reason they grow it in the desert is the lack of boll weevils).

 

All a booming population and better technology did was accelerate the inevitable, but it did not cause it unless you want to tie human population to global warming in general. In that case it's a function of too many people trying to enjoy an egregiously unsustainable lifestyle and so is arguably caused not so much by overpopulation per se as by too large a percentage of that population wanting to live a certain energy and resource-intensive lifestyle that this planet can only sustain at exponentially lower levels. It's not a matter of "more people=less water" even though I wish it was that simple since it would mean it'd be something we'd have a realistic chance of fixing.

 

And even if it really was just a matter too many people living there, then what? Make them move? Put in a new pipeline from the Mississippi River? Regardless of the cause it's still a problem that actually needs fixing real soon since prolonged water shortages will lead to food shortages.


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#39 shiftingshadows

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Posted 19 August 2021 - 06:08 PM

If one wants more data on the big picture, this website offers lots of data:

 

start of front page:    "For the last half dozen years this web site has served as my "explorer's notebook".  It documents, in a very personal voice, my journey of discovery through the worlds of energy, ecology, economics and human culture.  It describes my point of view on the largely unrecognized, widely misunderstood and potentially tragic predicament facing humanity as a result of our refusal to accept limits on our activities or aspirations.

I no longer see any point in singling out individual aspects of the human experience for special attention or criticism. Population growth, climate change, global corporatism, chemical pollution, resource depletion, species extinctions, ocean overfishing and acidification, global financial instability, mounting social disparities and injustices are all merely symptoms of a system that has been out of control for centuries (despite our earnest attempts to convince ourselves otherwise.) We have no choice left - or perhaps we never really had any other choice - but to ride the dragon until the human overshoot corrects itself, as overshoots always do."... etc. ...

 

which leads to a table of contents with dozens of articles - going back to 2007

 

http://www.paulchefurka.ca/

 

https://duckduckgo.c...rka&t=hk&ia=web

 

interview etc, with Paul C. may also be found on Youtube

 

as to who Paul is, that may be found here:

 

http://globalsensema...le/PaulChefurka


Edited by shiftingshadows, 19 August 2021 - 06:16 PM.


#40 newmoon

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Posted 20 August 2021 - 09:45 AM

We do still have a choice that will at least soften the impact of what we're heading towards: economic degrowth and refocusing our society's efforts towards maintaining a decent global standard of living at the lowest GDP possible (this will of course require major shifts in agriculture, transit, and so on). GDP and economic productivity, not population in itself, are generally considered the primary drivers of greenhouse gas emissions.

 

It's unlikely that we as a society are going to make the necessary decisions to get out of this intact, but it's defeatist and, honestly, monstrous not to try - the consequences of not doing so are dire, particularly for the "global south" and the less affluent parts of the world, and will likely be far worse than any previous crisis in human history...






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