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#21 TVCasualty

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 08:49 PM

Yikes. I turned down several opportunities to work at Lockheed Martin because I didn't want to have anything to do with bombs.

 

I quickly didn't, either. I was just a fan of the vigorous exothermic reactions, not fashioning them into actual destructive devices. I'm still a fan of those on special occasions. All the physics, none of the violence!

 

 

I'm a good example of why we need legal mushrooms ASAP. All it took was that one 7 gram bag (my first) to cure me of any and all militaristic/destructive aspirations (and suicidal ideation) when I was 17, and I was a stubborn bastard. Still am. But I was no match for 7 grams all by myself in the dark.

 

 


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#22 Microbe

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 09:06 PM

Speaking of clowns @Juthro

https://duckduckgo.c...h?v=SKXhuBe0oow

This is probably a @TVCasualty modified door....i hope they don't try to kick it

Edited by Microbe, 19 February 2021 - 09:09 PM.


#23 August West

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Posted 19 February 2021 - 09:40 PM

I also agree, no knock warrants are no bueno, nothing funny about them at all.   Though I do think Microbe was referring to the way the news, and LEO were portraying the story.


Yea, I knew what he meant about people getting busted. I stand by my point. There is nothing funny about the war on people who use drugs. It's perhaps the largest waste of human and material resources in the history of mankind outside the two "World Wars". It's obviously just me but I don't see the humor.
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#24 vork21

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 08:12 AM

"Against the assault of laughter, nothing can stand" - Mark Twain

 

Folks pointing out exactly what is funny about the war on drugs' failures and absurdities has provided the most powerful and influential social commentary against it, IMHO. 

I agree that there probably aren't many slapstick no-knock raids that fall in the 'humor as social commentary' category.  But in policy and construct of the war on drugs, I can't not see humor.

just my2cents


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#25 TVCasualty

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 09:30 AM

 

I also agree, no knock warrants are no bueno, nothing funny about them at all.   Though I do think Microbe was referring to the way the news, and LEO were portraying the story.


Yea, I knew what he meant about people getting busted. I stand by my point. There is nothing funny about the war on people who use drugs. It's perhaps the largest waste of human and material resources in the history of mankind outside the two "World Wars". It's obviously just me but I don't see the humor.

 

 

I agree with that point, to a point. Sometimes the only thing that's funny is the fact that nothing is funny anymore. Or maybe that's just something we tell ourselves so we can better tolerate existence. Hell if I know; much of my laughter these days is of the I'm-probably-losing-my-fucking-mind-here type.

 

Since we all know what the War on (people with) Drugs is really about I strongly suspect that if drugs weren't the vehicle for accomplishing what the war on the people with them does then it would be something else and just as many doors would still be getting kicked in to maintain the socioeconomic hegemony of the reptiles from Planet X who this way of doing things benefits. It would just be under some other bullshit pretext. Or maybe none at all, and without drugs things would have gone full-Orwell instead of only half (so far).

 

If it was just about drugs then there wouldn't currently be an unconscionable and entirely preventable humanitarian disaster going on in fucking Texas just because it got a little chillier than usual, which is to say almost as cold as some places get every year. And that was after being warned for 10+ years that it was coming, but they still weren't ready because they never intended to be. That level of callous disregard for human life is no different than kicking in the door to someone's home and murdering them because a piece of paper says they probably have drugs.

 

Any clownin' at all that we can get at the expense of the brainwashed tools who earn table scraps from the powerful by keeping the powerless powerless counts, like a shrinking violet blooming out of a crack in the pavement of a vast dumpscape. But at the same time I can understand not finding some kinds of "funny cop videos" funny at all since portraying them as affable buffoons only works while overlooking the fact of what they're actually engaged in at the time.

 

Portraying them as bumbling meatheaded fuckwits is also frustrating because it reminds some of us that we're subject to the "authority" of bumbling meatheaded fuckwits. That said, there might be genuine monsters in a house that the cops fuck up a raid on, and the world would be better served by its occupants no longer roaming around freely in it. That's what police are ostensibly for as far as the general public is mistakenly concerned (i.e., arresting dangerous and violent people, not raiding homes for victimless crimes). But they also ultimately do what they're told, so as law enforcement officers it's not on them what to enforce but as human beings whatever they actually choose to do (including joining the force) is entirely on them regardless of any orders or "policies" (particularly the unwritten ones).

 

Maybe a bit (or a lot) of mockery convinces some to clean up their act, reform their Department (lol), or just quit the force altogether? And maybe relentless mockery and satire convinces others to not join up in the first place?

 

I guess it all only works the way it is until our civilization either implodes or can figure out how to sustain itself upon a foundation that is not ultimately composed of slavery and rapacious exploitation. Laughter in such a context is not tacit approval, it's more like blowing a cognitive fuse so as to maintain sanity and self-control in the face of... well, you know.

 

 

This is even more applicable when you're ridiculously outgunned:

 

zlaughter

 

 

IMO this classic video is an example of being just another maddening chronicle of our collective insanity while simultaneously being pretty fucking hilarious:

 

[Direct Link]

 

 

How's that for a smooth segue back to the topic?  :cool:


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#26 Microbe

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 11:44 AM

http://drugs.globalincidentmap.com/

#27 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 02:56 PM

 

 

 

Watching those idiots pose in front of their precious drug bust's are something else.

 

You should see the look on their faces when members of several LE agencies (local police, CHP, and Border Patrol since this was in SoCal) bring a bunch of those photos to show off at a High School "Career Day" only to discover that SWIM and a FOAF had stolen them all. And a couple of hubcaps off their marked vehicles for good measure. This was back before digital photography so it wasn't so easy to replace the photos, kind of like the plants and stacks of drugs they depicted.

 

 

 

I designed a pretty cool no-knock/kick-in-proof door consisting of regular looking interior and exterior finishes but is tightly filled with very thin, loose vertical strips of bamboo that fill the core without any glue or fasteners. It's designed to be relatively easy to kick through, but only gives way by letting a foot or battering ram punch all the way through it (making a hole the size of their foot or battering ram).

 

Getting that foot back out without severe injury would require tools and great care as all the broken strips of bamboo create splinters that act as a one-way passage that would tear up someone's lower leg and foot if they tried to pull it out. And if it was a ram then it would just poke a hole but the door would remain otherwise intact (it might even fly out of their hands from the lack of anticipated resistance and end up in your living room; hey, free battering ram!!).

 

Granted, all a door made out of punji sticks does is delay the inevitable (unless it was a home invasion robbery), but that can sometimes be enough to deal with/flush what they might be looking for, or to flee through your escape tunnel. Y'all have escape tunnels, right? Just don't mention that the bamboo problem was by design; how the hell were you supposed to know what would happen if your door was kicked in?

 

 

 

The only concern I would have with such a device is if it was ever actually used and the cops noticed something fishy they could potentially charge a guy for setting booby traps. Not to sound like a Debbie downer but they have those rules in for fairly logical reasons. Like if an innocent first responder was trying to break into a house to respond to a medical emergency or fire and fell prey to someone's trap. I just watched that transpire about a month and a half ago at 2 am on my street. It was a false fire alarm but the person in the house was sound asleep, not sure exactly how they got in but eventually I could see them walking around in the dark on the inside with their flashlights lighting the place up. Of course I was flying on mushrooms at the time and the flashing lights and sirens outside my window did give me a bid of a scare. Poking one eye through the blinds wondering WTF at first. The jig is UP! They got me!

 

A trap is “absolutely incapable of exercising discretion or reason. Rather, it sentences its victim to death or great bodily injury in a split second explosion of deadly force.”  Because of that possibility, police, prosecutors and the courts are absolutely willing to press charges against people who booby-trap their property.

 

While I don't find the war on drugs funny, I would agree with the sentiment that comedy really is our most powerful form of social commentary. It was one of the last bastions of free speech where you could get away with challenging aggressive cultural norms and succeed in pointing out the absurdity in a humorous way. These days though that conduit has been under intense assault from the politically correct millennials that think a new wave of puritanism is going to be the cure


Edited by FLASHINGROOSTER, 20 February 2021 - 03:05 PM.

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#28 TVCasualty

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 03:11 PM

I got the idea when I was tossing some stuff up on to my porch while unloading a car from a camping trip. A folding chair hit a cooler and flipped over and the foot hit my door and put a hole in it that was really hard to get the damn chair leg out of because of the splintered front panel. This was also when I discovered that my front door was hollow core (WTF??). So a hollow core door works almost the same way and isn't a booby trap.

 

Just don't yell "Gotcha!" when you see a jackboot protruding through your door and it'll be hard to pin on you as intentional. They almost always use battering rams anyway, so it's going to work more in practice as a "be like water" sort of passive/yielding defense against rigid, brute force. So you're much more likely to get a free battering ram dropped into your foyer than a foot stuck in your door.

 

And it's not lethal unless you try to yank your leg out and sever an artery, and there will be a very strong incentive not to do that.


Edited by TVCasualty, 20 February 2021 - 03:11 PM.

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#29 FLASHINGROOSTER

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 03:16 PM

I thought about editing the lethal part out as I know that was certainly not your intent,  it was part of that quote and I left it in by pure lazyness


Edited by FLASHINGROOSTER, 20 February 2021 - 04:45 PM.


#30 August West

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Posted 20 February 2021 - 04:41 PM

"Against the assault of laughter, nothing can stand" - Mark Twain

 

Folks pointing out exactly what is funny about the war on drugs' failures and absurdities has provided the most powerful and influential social commentary against it, IMHO. 

I agree that there probably aren't many slapstick no-knock raids that fall in the 'humor as social commentary' category.  But in policy and construct of the war on drugs, I can't not see humor.

just my2cents

 

Completely agree. And humor that lasts, is typically the darkest. The failures and absurdities surrounding "The War On Drugs" should be pointed out whenever someone bends an ear to listen. So sure, I'll amend my statement to be less dogmatic. As you alluded, the drug war is humorous the same way the story of Sisyphus is. I just don't find low-IQ news readers (as the initial video is what generated the comment) regurgitating a corporate sponsored, uncritical sound bite about a raid to be a powerful social commentary on the failures and absurdities of anything. It simply is an absurd failure.

 

Carry on.


Edited by August West, 20 February 2021 - 04:43 PM.

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#31 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 07:45 AM

Civilization would have collapsed a lot sooner than it's likely to now if I'd not discovered psychedelics and ended up being a weapons designer at a defense company instead. I almost applied to a military Academy for a while during my depressed pyromaniac phase in High School, but then... mushrooms happened to me instead. So (magic) mushrooms not only CAN save the world, they arguably already have!

 

TV, are you saying that you personally would have "DESTROYED THE WORLD!!!!!" if you had not found the magick?  :biggrin:  Love it!


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#32 TVCasualty

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 09:03 AM

 

Civilization would have collapsed a lot sooner than it's likely to now if I'd not discovered psychedelics and ended up being a weapons designer at a defense company instead. I almost applied to a military Academy for a while during my depressed pyromaniac phase in High School, but then... mushrooms happened to me instead. So (magic) mushrooms not only CAN save the world, they arguably already have!

 

TV, are you saying that you personally would have "DESTROYED THE WORLD!!!!!" if you had not found the magick?  :biggrin:  Love it!

 

 

Just the human one, not the real one.

 

I still might.


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#33 Microbe

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 12:04 PM

This is an old photo, but this is proof, LEO and Government agencies are misinformed on mushrooms. They are handling a miricale drug as if it were Anthrax.

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#34 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 23 February 2021 - 02:20 PM

OMG what a bunch of idiots.  You would think they would at least "try" to know something about what the hell they are "busting people" for.


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#35 Microbe

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 01:24 PM



https://www.dailymai...ern-Sydney.html
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#36 TVCasualty

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 01:41 PM

OMG what a bunch of idiots.  You would think they would at least "try" to know something about what the hell they are "busting people" for.

 

I bet they do, mostly.
 
One of the weirdest things about government budgets are provisions where a department or program has to spend what it's allotted or it won't get as much next year (which is a rather perverse incentive to waste money). So use that PPG if you got it!
 
And it also acts as a prejudicial theatrical production when the "evidence" is presented to a jury who also sees it being carried out of a residence in a suburban neighborhood by people wearing hazmat suits. This spectacle plays into the jury's ignorance and reactionary fear since the people who end up serving on a jury probably live in similar neighborhoods and photos like that scare the hell out of them, and of course "WHAT ABOUT THE CHILDREN?!?"
 
On the other hand, they really don't know if a grower is competent, so they could conceivably raid the house of a rookie grower who only ended up creating a toxic mold factory in which case those suits would be a very good idea. This is not to say that raiding homes for growing fungi is in any way justified on moral or ethical grounds.
 


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#37 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 02:44 PM

Yep, good point about the budgeting.  I worked as a civilian electrical engineer for Griffiss AFB before it got turned into a state park way back in the day (80's) and yes, you must find ways to use up all the budget if you wanted a bigger budget (or even equal) the next year.  Insanity.


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#38 Microbe

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Posted 03 March 2021 - 07:10 AM

https://www.clevelan...iple-guns-raid/

#39 TVCasualty

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Posted 03 March 2021 - 10:26 AM

Well this was timely:

 

[Direct Link]

 

He wrung about as much humor as anyone could from the subject, but much of that was thanks to the surreal existence of Cop Rock (spoiler alert: the cops don't really rock at all, it's more like child trafficking meets 'easy listening,' which makes no sense until you watch the clip).

 

 

 

So what happens if/when a critical mass of the population wakes up to the fact that they're all de facto serfs indentured to dark Lords while trapped in the Lite Ages as the climate destabilizes? Do they, or rather we (since anyone reading this is a serf, including any LEOs), just shrug and get back to work to keep our little go-nowhere hamster wheels spinning and hope our doors don't get no-knocked in? Yeah, probably. If it were otherwise then we wouldn't have let the insanity get to this point in the first place. And at this point there's so much momentum behind how insane things are that we probably have no choice but to ride this whole unsustainable mess right into the ground; united at last!


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#40 Microbe

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 08:42 AM

Link here: https://www.rutherfo...o_your_property



Americans are not safe in their homes.

Not anymore, at least.

This present menace comes from the government and its army of bureaucratized, corporatized, militarized mercenaries who are waging war on the last stronghold left to us as a free people: the sanctity of our homes.

The weapons of this particular war on our personal security and our freedoms include an abundance of laws that criminalize almost everything we do, a government that views our private property as its own, militarized police who have been brainwashed into believing that they operate above the law, courts that insulate police from charges of wrongdoing, legislatures that legitimize the government’s usurpations of our rights, and a populace that is so ignorant of their rights and distracted by partisan politics as to be utterly incapable of standing up to the government’s overreaches, incursions and power grabs.

This is how far the mighty have fallen.

Government agents—with or without a warrant, with or without probable cause that criminal activity is afoot, and with or without the consent of the homeowner—are now justified in mounting home invasions in order to pursue traffic violators, seize lawfully-owned weapons, carry out knock-and-talk “chats” with homeowners in the dead of night, “prevent” individuals from harming themselves, provide emergency aid, intervene in the face of imminent danger, serve as community caretakers, chase down individuals suspected of committing misdemeanor crimes, and anything else they can get away with.

This doesn’t even begin to touch on the many ways the government and its corporate partners-in-crime may be using surveillance technology—with or without the blessing of the courts—to invade one’s home: with wiretaps, thermal imaging, surveillance cameras, and other monitoring devices.

However, while the courts and legislatures have yet to fully address the implications of such virtual intrusions on our Fourth Amendment, there is no mistaking the physical intrusions by police into the privacy of one’s home: the toehold entry, the battering ram, the SWAT raid, the knock-and-talk conversation, etc.

Whether such intrusions, warranted or otherwise, are unconstitutional continues to be litigated, legislated and debated.

The spirit of the Constitution, drafted by men who chafed against the heavy-handed tyranny of an imperial ruler, would suggest that one’s home is a fortress, safe from almost every kind of intrusion. Unfortunately, a collective assault by the government’s cabal of legislators, litigators, judges and militarized police has all but succeeded in reducing that fortress—and the Fourth Amendment alongside it—to a crumbling pile of rubble.

Two cases before the U.S. Supreme Court this term, Caniglia v. Strom and Lange v. California, are particularly noteworthy.

In Caniglia v. Strom, police want to be able to carry out warrantless home invasions in order to seize lawfully-owned guns under the pretext of their so-called “community caretaking” duties. Under the “community caretaking” exception to the Fourth Amendment, police can conduct warrantless searches of vehicles relating to accident investigations and provide aid to “citizens who are ill or in distress.”

At a time when red flag gun laws are gaining traction as a legislative means by which to allow police to remove guns from people suspected of being threats, it wouldn’t take much to expand the Fourth Amendment’s “community caretaking” exception to allow police to enter a home without a warrant and seize lawfully-possessed firearms based on concerns that the guns might pose a danger.

What we do not need is yet another pretext by which government officials can violate the Fourth Amendment at will under the pretext of public health and safety.

In Lange v. California, police want to be able to enter homes without warrants as long as they can claim to be in pursuit of someone they suspect may have committed a crime. Yet as Justice Neil Gorsuch points out, in an age in which everything has been criminalized, that leaves the door wide open for police to enter one’s home in pursuit of any and all misdemeanor crimes.

At issue in Lange is whether police can justify entering homes without a warrant under the “hot pursuit” exception to the Fourth Amendment.

The case arose after a California cop followed a driver, Arthur Lange, who was honking his horn while listening to music. The officer followed Lange, supposedly to cite him for violating a local noise ordinance, but didn’t actually activate the police cruiser’s emergency lights until Lange had already arrived home and entered his garage. Sticking his foot under the garage door just as it was about to close, the cop confronted Lange, smelled alcohol on his breath, ordered him to take a sobriety test, and then charged him with a DUI and a noise infraction.

Lange is just chock full of troubling indicators of a greater tyranny at work.

Overcriminalization: That you can now get pulled over and cited for honking your horn while driving and listening to music illustrates just how uptight and over-regulated life in the American police state has become.

Make-work policing: At a time when crime remains at an all-time low, it’s telling that a police officer has nothing better to do than follow a driver seemingly guilty of nothing more than enjoying loud music.

Warrantless entry: That foot in the door is a tactic that, while technically illegal, is used frequently by police attempting to finagle their way into a home and sidestep the Fourth Amendment’s warrant requirement.

The definition of reasonable: Although the Fourth Amendment prohibits warrantless and unreasonable searches and seizures of “persons, houses, papers, and effects,” where we run into real trouble is when the government starts dancing around what constitutes a “reasonable” search. Of course, that all depends on who gets to decide what is reasonable. There’s even a balancing test that weighs the intrusion on a person’s right to privacy against the government’s interests, which include public safety.

Too often, the scales weigh in the government’s favor.

End runs around the law: The courts, seemingly more concerned with marching in lockstep with the police state than upholding the rights of the people, have provided police with a long list of exceptions that have gutted the Fourth Amendment’s once-robust privacy protections.

Exceptions to the Fourth Amendment’s warrant requirement allow the police to carry out warrantless searches: if someone agrees to the search; in order to ferret out weapons or evidence during the course of an arrest; if police think someone is acting suspiciously and may be armed; during a brief investigatory stop; if a cop sees something connected to a crime in plain view; if police are in hot pursuit of a suspect who flees into a building; if they believe a vehicle has contraband; in an emergency where there may not be time to procure a warrant; and at national borders and in airports.

In other words, almost anything goes when it comes to all the ways in which the government can now invade your home and lay siege to your property.

Thus we tumble down that slippery slope which might have started out with a genuine concern for public safety and the well-being of the citizenry only to end up as a self-serving expansion of the government’s powers that makes a mockery of the Fourth Amendment while utterly disregarding the rights of “we the people.”

Frankly, it’s a wonder we have any property interests, let alone property rights, left to protect.

Think about it.

That house you live in, the car you drive, the small (or not so small) acreage of land that has been passed down through your family or that you scrimped and saved to acquire, whatever money you manage to keep in your bank account after the government and its cronies have taken their first and second and third cut…none of it is safe from the government’s greedy grasp.

At no point do you ever have any real ownership in anything other than the clothes on your back.

Everything else can be seized by the government under one pretext or another (civil asset forfeiture, unpaid taxes, eminent domain, public interest, etc.).

The American Dream has been reduced to a lease arrangement in which we are granted the privilege of endlessly paying out the nose for assets that are only ours so long as it suits the government’s purposes.

And when it doesn’t suit the government’s purposes? Watch out.

This is not a government that respects the rights of its citizenry or the law. Rather, this is a government that sells its citizens to the highest bidder and speaks to them in a language of force.

Under such a fascist regime, the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which declares that no person shall “be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation,” has become yet another broken shield, incapable of rendering any protection against corporate greed while allowing the government to justify all manner of “takings” in the name of the public good.

What we are grappling with is a government that has forfeited its purpose for existing.

Philosophers dating back to John Locke have long asserted that the true purpose of government is to protect our rights, not just our collective rights as a people, but our individual rights, specifically our rights to life, liberty and property. As James Madison concluded in the Federalist Papers, “Government is instituted no less for the protection of the property than of the persons of individuals.”

What we have been saddled with is a government that has not only lost sight of its primary reason for being—to protect the people’s rights—but has also re-written the script and cast itself as an imperial overlord with all of the neo-feudal authority such a position entails.

Let me put it another way.

If the government can tell you what you can and cannot do within the privacy of your home, whether it relates to what you eat, what you smoke or whom you love, you no longer have any rights whatsoever within your home.

If government officials can fine and arrest you for growing vegetables in your front yard, gathering with friends to worship in your living room, installing solar panels on your roof, and raising chickens in your backyard, you’re no longer the owner of your property.

If school officials can punish your children for what they do or say while at home or in your care, your children are not your own—they are the property of the state.

If government agents can invade your home, break down your doors, kill your dog, damage your furnishings and terrorize your family, your property is no longer private and secure—it belongs to the government.

If police can forcefully draw your blood, strip search you, probe you intimately, or force you to submit to vaccinations or lose your so-called “privileges” to move about and interact freely with your fellow citizens, your body is no longer your own—it is the government’s to do with as it deems best.

Likewise, if the government can lockdown whole communities and by extension the nation, quarantine whole segments of the population, outlaw religious gatherings and assemblies of more than a few people, shut down entire industries and manipulate the economy, muzzle dissidents, and “stop and seize any plane, train or automobile to stymie the spread of contagious disease,” then you no longer have a property interest as master of your own life, either.

This is what a world without the Fourth Amendment looks like, where the lines between private and public property have been so blurred that private property is reduced to little more than something the government can use to control, manipulate and harass you to suit its own purposes, and you the homeowner and citizen have been reduced to little more than a tenant or serf in bondage to an inflexible landlord.

If we continue down this road, the analogy shifts from property owners to prisoners in a government-run prison with local and federal police acting as prison guards. In such an environment, you have no rights.

So what can we do, short of scrapping this whole experiment in self-government and starting over?

At a minimum, we need to rebuild the foundations of our freedoms.

What this will mean is adopting an apolitical, nonpartisan, zero tolerance attitude towards the government when it oversteps its bounds and infringes on our rights.

We need courts that prioritize the rights of the citizenry over the government’s insatiable hunger for power at all costs.

We need people in the government—representatives, bureaucrats, etc.—who honor the public service oath to uphold and defend the Constitution.

Most of all, we need to reclaim control over our runaway government and restore our freedoms.

After all, we are the government. As I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, “we the people” are supposed to be the ones calling the shots. As John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the United States, rightly observed: “No power on earth has a right to take our property from us without our consent.”




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