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Best suited woodlovers for outdoor beds in Durham NC


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#1 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 04:13 PM

Hey all. Just moved back down south. I know that caerulescens and caerulipes are native to the area but I was wondering if we non native woodloving species might do well outdoors in a bed. Like ovoids, azures, or cyans? Anyone have experience with those species in this hardiness zone 7B

#2 Arathu

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 08:01 PM

You might be blazing trails ovoid.....

 

https://mycotopia.ne...row-log/page-13

 

Last post of the page.........

 

A



#3 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 09:45 PM

You might be blazing trails ovoid.....
 
https://mycotopia.ne...row-log/page-13
 
Last post of the page.........
 
A


Thanks Arathu. I'll have to give that a read soon. I think ovoids would do well here. They are abundant in VA which is not far. I'm also wondering how subaeruginosa would do since the forests here are so heavily dominated by pines.
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#4 hyphaenation

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Posted 22 February 2021 - 11:05 PM

I "wood" try the multi-species approach to hedge bets... at the slow rate woodlovers go ...if you try one per season you could be at it some time... which aint so bad in itself. They all have the same germinating/starting parameters so why not do a test-plot for as many as possible,

 

Good luck.


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#5 Arathu

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Posted 24 February 2021 - 08:49 PM

I definitely agree with testing multiple species....hell after this winter many might think they were in their home territory.....

 

I think the subs are good one to try for certain.....especially with the pines......

 

But a bed of wood chips under the pines works well too....test a few for sure...

 

A


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#6 ChocolateStarfish

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 07:46 AM

Im growing azurescens in texas, im sure you can grow them there



#7 ChocolateStarfish

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 07:47 AM

you may just have to water it frequently like i do, cuz the cold seasons arent that wet out here sadly:/ though i am sure that there are times when they could occur out here naturally if spores were present, which they are now(;



#8 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 08:32 PM

you may just have to water it frequently like i do, cuz the cold seasons arent that wet out here sadly:/ though i am sure that there are times when they could occur out here naturally if spores were prese usent, which they are now(;


The winters here in Durham are very wet. No shortage of rain here during the cold months
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#9 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 25 February 2021 - 08:34 PM

I definitely agree with testing multiple species....hell after this winter many might think they were in their home territory.....
 
I think the subs are good one to try for certain.....especially with the pines......
 
But a bed of wood chips under the pines works well too....test a few for sure...
 
A


I am very interested in introducing subs here. There are tons of pines and from what I've read they can grow on pine needles alone. I'm not sure of the risk of introducing a non native fungal species here, but I'd like to try and see what happens.
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#10 ChocolateStarfish

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Posted 26 February 2021 - 07:34 PM

I definitely agree with testing multiple species....hell after this winter many might think they were in their home territory.....

I think the subs are good one to try for certain.....especially with the pines......

But a bed of wood chips under the pines works well too....test a few for sure...

A

I am very interested in introducing subs here. There are tons of pines and from what I've read they can grow on pine needles alone. I'm not sure of the risk of introducing a non native fungal species here, but I'd like to try and see what happens.
Theres no risk of it being invasive or anything sense it wont disturb the ecosystem you put it in because it isnt parasitic and wont cause any native life to go extinct due to the introduced species stealing a limited resource... As wood (a wood-lovers food of choice) isnt usually in short supply in most ecosystems.
I dont believe there are any psilocybe mushrooms that could damage an environment it started thriving in, but was not originally native to


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Edited by ChocolateStarfish, 26 February 2021 - 07:36 PM.


#11 Arathu

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 08:49 AM

 

 

I definitely agree with testing multiple species....hell after this winter many might think they were in their home territory.....

I think the subs are good one to try for certain.....especially with the pines......

But a bed of wood chips under the pines works well too....test a few for sure...

A

I am very interested in introducing subs here. There are tons of pines and from what I've read they can grow on pine needles alone. I'm not sure of the risk of introducing a non native fungal species here, but I'd like to try and see what happens.
Theres no risk of it being invasive or anything sense it wont disturb the ecosystem you put it in because it isnt parasitic and wont cause any native life to go extinct due to the introduced species stealing a limited resource... As wood (a wood-lovers food of choice) isnt usually in short supply in most ecosystems.
I dont believe there are any psilocybe mushrooms that could damage an environment it started thriving in, but was not originally native to


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It's certainly something to consider. Just like the Japanese knotweed deal for example, some folks detest it's aggressive and invasive nature (it's a serious issue in the UK from what I've read but we all know how accurate "reporting" is) and some folks like it. Ovoids DEFINITELY like it.....our world is constantly changing. What we call "stable", at least in my own views, actually just has a long time-base that appears to be stable but everything is changing and evolving.

 

I do know this, just TRY and stop the spread of spores, bacteria, and viruses........give that a shot......I'm betting all three ride the winds, the jet streams, and very likely extra-terrestrial ejecta, comet masses, and planetary debris..... 70 to 100 "years" is just not enough time to grasp the MUCH LARGER pictures involved.....

 

My personal opinion is that we should concentrate on managing our plastics and other wastes, replant our forests on a global scale, move under ground and do our "dirty work" right where Mom does hers and let the surface return to the PARADISE that it is...

 

Good thinking though.....

 


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#12 rockyfungus

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 09:07 AM


I do know this, just TRY and stop the spread of spores, bacteria, and viruses........give that a shot......I'm betting all three ride the winds, the jet streams, and very likely extra-terrestrial ejecta, comet masses, and planetary debris..... 70 to 100 "years" is just not enough time to grasp the MUCH LARGER pictures involved.....

 

My personal opinion is that we should concentrate on managing our plastics and other wastes, replant our forests on a global scale, move under ground and do our "dirty work" right where Mom does hers and let the surface return to the PARADISE that it is...

 

Good thinking though.....

 

 

Seen 12 Monkeys?


Edited by rockyfungus, 27 February 2021 - 09:19 AM.

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#13 ovoideocystidiata247

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 07:32 PM

I definitely agree with testing multiple species....hell after this winter many might think they were in their home territory.....
I think the subs are good one to try for certain.....especially with the pines......
But a bed of wood chips under the pines works well too....test a few for sure...
A

I am very interested in introducing subs here. There are tons of pines and from what I've read they can grow on pine needles alone. I'm not sure of the risk of introducing a non native fungal species here, but I'd like to try and see what happens.
Theres no risk of it being invasive or anything sense it wont disturb the ecosystem you put it in because it isnt parasitic and wont cause any native life to go extinct due to the introduced species stealing a limited resource... As wood (a wood-lovers food of choice) isnt usually in short supply in most ecosystems.
I dont believe there are any psilocybe mushrooms that could damage an environment it started thriving in, but was not originally native to
Sent from my LM-Q710(FGN) using Tapatalk

I was worried about it possibly displacing a native decomposer.
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#14 ChocolateStarfish

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Posted 27 February 2021 - 10:15 PM

I definitely agree with testing multiple species....hell after this winter many might think they were in their home territory.....
I think the subs are good one to try for certain.....especially with the pines......
But a bed of wood chips under the pines works well too....test a few for sure...
A

I am very interested in introducing subs here. There are tons of pines and from what I've read they can grow on pine needles alone. I'm not sure of the risk of introducing a non native fungal species here, but I'd like to try and see what happens.
Theres no risk of it being invasive or anything sense it wont disturb the ecosystem you put it in because it isnt parasitic and wont cause any native life to go extinct due to the introduced species stealing a limited resource... As wood (a wood-lovers food of choice) isnt usually in short supply in most ecosystems.
I dont believe there are any psilocybe mushrooms that could damage an environment it started thriving in, but was not originally native to
Sent from my LM-Q710(FGN) using Tapatalk
I was worried about it possibly displacing a native decomposer.
No i get you, it would just be another decomposer amongst the many others if it did manage to integrate itself into your local environment, though that would be pretty incredible if you managed that, it is pretty unlikely to begin with, so you'll be good.

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