Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Maple Syrup Season Has Officially Come to an END...


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,599 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 06 April 2021 - 01:31 PM

This is our stock pile when we still had 2-3 weeks left in the season... There is no more recent photo but obviously there is now more, probably 35% more give or take...

 

IMG_3845.JPG

 

 


  • Skywatcher, Juthro, Mushinist and 3 others like this

#2 Mushinist

Mushinist

    Mycotopiate

  • Black VIP
  • 252 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 06 April 2021 - 01:39 PM

Man I love maple syrup, friend sends me a dark and robust maple syrup from NY, it's so good I can just drink it!

Nice stockpile!
  • Juthro likes this

#3 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,599 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 06 April 2021 - 01:53 PM

Man I love maple syrup, friend sends me a dark and robust maple syrup from NY, it's so good I can just drink it!

Nice stockpile!

 

This was our first season making it. We tapped 40 trees and our yield was less than expected which I think can be explained by the type of maple trees we have. Sugar Maples yield more finished product per gallon of sap due to the higher sugar content. 

 

We had some darker stuff, some stuff that was really clear, and the balance that had a foggy appearance but was lighter in color. I am not 100% sure what caused the difference in appearance. My Dad thinks it has something to do with the temperature at which he is cooking it. I think it may have something to do with the state of the tree when the sap was harvested. The clearest finished product had more of a maple flavor rather than predominately tasting the sugar and it was produced from the second round of sap we harvested. It seemed to get foggier through the middle and darker at the end... We are still figuring out what causes the differences and as dad said...  Right now we are producing syrup at $50-60 a pint... We have to keep producing in subsequent seasons to get that number down even though we have no intention to sell it currently. So over the period where we get that price down and make good on our equipment investment, i am sure we will gain a greater understanding as to what causes the differences in the syrup's appearance. The reasons could range from temperature and state of the tree as it wakes up in the spring after being dormant to something like the amount of water in the ground that can be accessed by the roots... The clearest batch was produced after our last major snow melt. It is anecdotal and my parents tell me I am nuts but I suspect that the abundance of water available to the roots could be a factor.


  • Mushinist and Auhron like this

#4 Juthro

Juthro

    dope smoking hillbilly

  • OG VIP
  • 9,713 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 06 April 2021 - 01:53 PM

I do like me some maple syrup :)  Maple trees aren't native this far north, so around here they push birch syrup, cuz that's the kind of trees we have.   Don't let my native friends hear me say this, but I much prefer maple over birch.   

 

That collection of bottles = a lot of time, and work, I'm impressed.   So are you moving into the syrup business PJ, or are you on a new fangled flapjack diet?


  • PJammer24 likes this

#5 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,599 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 06 April 2021 - 02:02 PM

I do like me some maple syrup :)  Maple trees aren't native this far north, so around here they push birch syrup, cuz that's the kind of trees we have.   Don't let my native friends hear me say this, but I much prefer maple over birch.   

 

That collection of bottles = a lot of time, and work, I'm impressed.   So are you moving into the syrup business PJ, or are you on a new fangled flapjack diet?

 

 

We talked about selling it, I could produce 2-3 times as much next season based on the trees I have available. My mom is the one who did the research and she says that we would have to be properly licensed to sell the syrup but that can be done easily enough, I think it is $35. My parents farm was previously operated as a tree farm/nursery and now that I am living at home I would like to take full advantage of the resources there. The sap was collected from trees on the farm and the evaporator was fired using gas from the farm's gas well...

 

My next project is an attempt to get truffles growing in the oak sections of the farm but I am not even sure it will be possible to inoculate the existing trees... As I mentioned in a separate thread, our oaks are pin oaks rather than the European varieties which are more typically used. I can find no information on whether pin oaks and truffle mycelium can form a relationship.

 

My place down the street is garden and berries at the time being and I am looking forward to planting my orchard. Dad's horse farm has become the syrup farm and will hopefully be truffles also... Dad says the syrup was his idea and I am going to let him have it but in reality, he told me we didn't have enough maple's last summer when i started talking about it... It's dad's syrup... If he wants it he can have it for the time being!


  • Juthro and makinbones69 like this

#6 makinbones69

makinbones69

    Mycotopiate

  • VIP
  • 1,143 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 06 April 2021 - 06:19 PM

I want to follow this but the season is over rover boo. Very cool jammer. I wish we had winters lending to such activities. Sadly I do not.
  • PJammer24 likes this

#7 pharmer

pharmer

    Mycotopiate

  • OG VIP
  • 4,432 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 07 April 2021 - 10:47 AM

Agreed on different species making different flavors and intensities. I'm happy with the taste of my syrup this year but it's not very intense. Even boiled to 220F and left to evaporate a little more it's still nowhere as good as stuff I find at farm stands. I'm tapping only one tree so it's probably time to experiment on some others.

 

Youtubers say you can tap maples, birch, walnut, and box elder which, strangely, is a first cousin of maple. Apparently maple is the choice because it's normally at the 40 to 1 ratio where the others are up to 80 to 1.

 

Also, I'm convinced that  later in the sap collecting season, like just before the leaves start popping, the chemical makeup of the sap changes. I get more milky coagulants in the sap itself than in February which is basically clear. I'm guessing it's the stuff that causes nitre.

 

Also, I don't have an endless supply of firewood or a proper evaporator setup so I use the freeze method. Maybe that does something to the intensity of the flavor as well. Who knows???



#8 PJammer24

PJammer24

    Archetype Novice

  • OG VIP
  • 2,599 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 07 April 2021 - 11:35 AM

Agreed on different species making different flavors and intensities. I'm happy with the taste of my syrup this year but it's not very intense. Even boiled to 220F and left to evaporate a little more it's still nowhere as good as stuff I find at farm stands. I'm tapping only one tree so it's probably time to experiment on some others.

 

Youtubers say you can tap maples, birch, walnut, and box elder which, strangely, is a first cousin of maple. Apparently maple is the choice because it's normally at the 40 to 1 ratio where the others are up to 80 to 1.

 

Also, I'm convinced that  later in the sap collecting season, like just before the leaves start popping, the chemical makeup of the sap changes. I get more milky coagulants in the sap itself than in February which is basically clear. I'm guessing it's the stuff that causes nitre.

 

Also, I don't have an endless supply of firewood or a proper evaporator setup so I use the freeze method. Maybe that does something to the intensity of the flavor as well. Who knows???

 

 

We also saw a change in the syrup later in the season. It seemed to get darker rather than milky. One of our first batches, as I mention above, was super clear. All of the later batches were foggy or milky as you put it... It seemed like the last batches we did got darker in color.

 

I believe the 40:1 ratio is when using sugar maples. I don't think any of our are sugar maples and we have been getting a yield almost half that. Dad has been doing all of the evaporating and I have had little input, I am the sap collection guy!!






Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!