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"Quick composter"


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#1 SelfTransformingMachineElf

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Posted 26 April 2021 - 07:51 PM

Has anyone ever tried out one of the little turning composters for quickly creating a small amount of compost for use in cultivation?  I'm interested in trying one.  I'm thinking about adding some clean straw and cow manure and doing a light compost for actives.  Worth a try, or bad idea?


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#2 drmcnasty

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Posted 26 April 2021 - 09:31 PM

I'm not cheap but I have a hard time justifying spending $129+ for a can to rot my rottables in. With minimal effort and a few dollars you could have a sweet setup. Shit rots on the ground. Just keep it moist and keep turning it. Then you can build whatever structure around it to make life easy. You could also just use a bin or trashcan. Another thought would be vermicomposting which you could get started for under $50.

Keep it simple
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#3 Skywatcher

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 08:57 AM

I was gifted one of those turning composter's quite a few years ago. I love it. I have had a load going most of the year, every year since. As long as the mix is at least 30% dry brown with the rest green, it cooks pretty fast.

I had a supply for horse manure when I first started which made some of the best compost, but I have pretty good results with the addition of some "Hot" material like a handful of blood meal when the contents are not very diverse.


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#4 SelfTransformingMachineElf

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 04:12 PM

@drmcnasty - believe it or not, if a turning composter can save me a dozen minutes a few times a week, it's well worth a hundred bucks to me.  I'm going to fiddle with traditional composting too, when that elusive thing called "time" shows up again at my doorstep.

 

@Skywalker - I'm thinking about using it to get straw/cow manure ready for cultivation - both of actives and inactives.  Have you fiddled with adding straw?


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#5 Skywatcher

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 09:03 PM

@Skywalker - I'm thinking about using it to get straw/cow manure ready for cultivation - both of actives and inactives.  Have you fiddled with adding straw?

I have not used straw, but I have used hay. My reason was a lack of dry brown leaves etc. on a few occasions. I had to run the mower over it first,to get it to smaller piece's. I see no reason straw would be any different....

 

You should have the process down pretty well as far as maintaining the correct moisture content.....

By the way, my name here is Skywatcher, by my friends just call me Skye and you are welcome to do so if you like.

 


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#6 Myc

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 10:24 PM

Reading along here.

The only difference between straw and hay is that hay retains its seed head (the whole plant), whereas straw is just the plant stalk.


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#7 SelfTransformingMachineElf

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 07:32 AM

My apologies, Skye.   :blush:


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#8 Skywatcher

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 05:03 PM

No need for apologies, we all "speed read" at times. You glance at something written and your brain will immediately recognize the word as something in common memory.

 

If you go forward with the turning composter, keep an eye on the moisture. Green waste breaks down and adds quite a bit, so I usually kick off a new batch without adding additional water. I spin mine everyday for the first week. I also do not always have a good full load at first, but I have found if I just keep adding as I have more leaves, lawn mower clippings, and kitchen vegetable waste, it will just keep going as long as it doesn't dry out.

 

I also have a thermometer with a long sensor post that I find quite useful to determine if it is still "cooking".


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#9 drmcnasty

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 07:19 AM

I feel like I need to apologize too. I didn't mean to sound like an asshole. My point was that it's a lot easier than it seems and it's a cycle that happens on its own. A little effort will speed up the process. I completely understand the lack of time and need for simplicity.
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#10 SelfTransformingMachineElf

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 07:46 AM

No need to apologize!  Your advice is well-received.  I've tried big compost before and the fact of the matter is I just don't turn it.  One day maybe!



#11 rockyfungus

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 11:26 AM

I've been using an old trash can with a ton of holes drilled in it. When I remember I shake it or use a shovel/pitchfork to turn it. Little bit of manure, straw, spent compost, some bloodmeal and it's pretty hands off to me. I just add any fallen twigs leaves and like every third time I mow the yard I'll give it the clippings. 

 

I don't really pay attention to temperature or wetness. Just remember to add more browns then greens and should be fine. I avoid all food scraps except for coffee and occasionally veggies. Suppose to stay away from rose plants and a few other varieties I can't recall.

 


Edited by rockyfungus, 29 April 2021 - 04:11 PM.

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#12 kcmoxtractor

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Posted 30 April 2021 - 01:47 PM

If you want to make good compost for mushrooms, you need a bigger pile. It needs to hit thermophilic temperatures to build an immune system and convert the ammonia to nitrates without offgassing. You can yield 2-3x as much by making a proper hot compost than with a half measure. Good hot compost is practically contamination proof.

https://pubmed.ncbi....h.gov/29362825/

https://www.research...orus_Lange_Sing

Edited by kcmoxtractor, 30 April 2021 - 01:47 PM.

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