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#1 Cosmicwave

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 02:53 PM

hello everyone, all in peace? I made my first harvest today, and I would like someone to help me, or guide me so that I know where I should work, for better development ... to make the monotub, I used a 10 liter gallon of water, very used here in Brazil , and lined at the bottom with a black, unused, obvious LOL trash bag. I had difficulty fixing it on the bottom, so I didn't do hahahaha ... I covered the wrapper (only vermiculite), during the incubation, with aluminum foil, and left it in a very dark place. When the development of the mycelium in the enclosure was over, I removed the aluminum and started to ventilate 40 seconds, and spray water on all sides of the monotube, without directly reaching the mycelium ... after the pins appeared, I kept the same exchange system. gas and moisture. Now, the question is, when it's time for the next Flushes, I think about saturating the monotub with the same sprinkler, with good water, and then finding a way to remove all the excess to avoid contamination ... Any advice? In addition, I want to express my immense gratitude for this place and all the organizers and members, you have changed my personal life, it's no joke ...

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#2 TVCasualty

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 04:12 PM

After picking off the mushrooms dunk it over night (let it soak in enough clean water to make it start to float). Then put it back into the tub and keep doing what you did for the first flush since it worked (congratulations!).

 

You might want to give them more fresh air, so fan them more than you did for the first flush. The humidity looks a little too high. Trays do great at 85% rH. Only cakes need it maxed-out (95%+).

 

After dunking and putting them back, don't mess with them except for fanning (and some misting when needed). They prefer to be left alone at this stage.

 

 

 

And welcome to Mycotopia! Looks like you're doing great so far...


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#3 Cosmicwave

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 07:18 PM

Wow, brother, how happy I am with the way you guys on the forum received me and still receive me. This is the best place in the world ... thank you very much for that. Regarding Dunk, how can I remove excess moisture? after having submerged overnigh
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#4 Sidestreet

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 04:05 AM

With cakes I wouldn't do anything special to remove excess moisture, but if you think it needs it you can put it on something clean to drip dry for a short while.



#5 Cosmicwave

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 02:41 PM

So, brother, this is what I don't understand about Casing ... do I become Casing and let it flow? thinking about the field's capacity, how am I going to leave it at the exact humidity point that I reached before, without fermenting ... you know?
the term dunk does not apply in this case(casing), right? maybe that was why the misunderstanding

#6 Cosmicwave

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 02:44 PM

wow, I got confused all over now Kkkkkkkkk, isn't the term "cake" just for PF TEK?

#7 TVCasualty

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 03:13 PM

Yes, cakes generally refer to flour-based substrates incubated in jars so they have the shape of the jar when they fruit. But you can dunk any substrate. When I dunk my trays I just pour water in until the sub floats. Then I drain the water by using a clean wire cooling rack (like for baking) to hold it in place while I dump the water.

 

Don't worry about casing. For cubensis it's not needed but a non-nutritious top layer (which can be just vermiculite) helps retain moisture which can result in bigger mushrooms. But in any case (so to speak) once a substrate has started fruiting then adding one would be counter-productive (just slow things down).

 

Most of the water the mushrooms need to get large comes from the substrate, not the misting. So just dunk overnight (~12 hours is fine, don't go much longer), drain the standing water, and put everything back they way it was before you dunked and continue fanning (a little more than you did for the first flush) and misting (less than you did for the first flush). Don't think about it any more than that. Fungi have been doing this since our ancestors were little rat-like furry things hiding from dinosaurs. They got this. Let them do their thing.

 

Your job is not to grow mushrooms. That's ridiculously easy. Your job is to kill everything else, and prevent it from returning for as long as possible. That's the tricky part. You're past that part once your sub reaches full colonization. It's kind of funny that we call ourselves "cultivators" when our role in the process consists almost entirely of killing every single other species of life that might be present, except one.


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#8 Cosmicwave

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 04:56 PM

Yes, cakes generally refer to flour-based substrates incubated in jars so they have the shape of the jar when they fruit. But you can dunk any substrate. When I dunk my trays I just pour water in until the sub floats. Then I drain the water by using a clean wire cooling rack (like for baking) to hold it in place while I dump the water.
 
Don't worry about casing. For cubensis it's not needed but a non-nutritious top layer (which can be just vermiculite) helps retain moisture which can result in bigger mushrooms. But in any case (so to speak) once a substrate has started fruiting then adding one would be counter-productive (just slow things down).
 
Most of the water the mushrooms need to get large comes from the substrate, not the misting. So just dunk overnight (~12 hours is fine, don't go much longer), drain the standing water, and put everything back they way it was before you dunked and continue fanning (a little more than you did for the first flush) and misting (less than you did for the first flush). Don't think about it any more than that. Fungi have been doing this since our ancestors were little rat-like furry things hiding from dinosaurs. They got this. Let them do their thing.
 
Your job is not to grow mushrooms. That's ridiculously easy. Your job is to kill everything else, and prevent it from returning for as long as possible. That's the tricky part. You're past that part once your sub reaches full colonization. It's kind of funny that we call ourselves "cultivators" when our role in the process consists almost entirely of killing every single other species of life that might be present, except one.

hahahahahahaha, this is really interesting ... we are something like "micro-killers" ... suddenly I found myself with huge alcohol rifles and chlorine-based solutions, going to war ... kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk (really I don't know how you guys laugh in the united states, but this is how we laugh in brazil)
thanks for the teachings, brothers, you are awesome!




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