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Hydrating hpoo with Rye water... endospores?


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#1 VibrationalAlchemy

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Posted 09 June 2021 - 11:57 AM

If this is in a thread somewhere, I can't find it.  So please advise if you know of such things.

 

I am preparing to do a bulk cubensis grow.  I want to hydrate my manure using rye soak (and/or simmer) water.  My questions is this….

 

Can endospores be present in the soak/simmer water?

...or are they contained within the grains?  

 

My understanding is that the endospores are germinated by soaking, which makes them easier to kill in the PC.  But not sure if they might leach into the water.  Just want to make sure I’m not introducing endospores to my hpoo and subsequently to the whole grow.  I have read many cases where people use the rye water for hydrating hpoo, but I just want to make sure Im not missing a step.

 



#2 TVCasualty

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Posted 09 June 2021 - 12:29 PM

I would advise against it.

 

You would be introducing a nutrient source that is non-selective (unlike manure). Pasteurizing manure hydrated with water from soaked grains would be sufficient to kill off whatever came along in the water but the problem is that the nutrients present in the water (the reason you want to do this, I'm guessing) would strongly encourage contaminant spores to sprout and grow as soon as it cooled off. And I mean spores endemic in the air. There's no way to avoid them.

 

The reason why we spawn with whole grain and get away with it is that the grain is fully colonized first, which affords it a strong degree of protection from contamination (the mycelium protects itself fairly well once it fully colonizes a food source).

 

If you try it, try it with a small test batch before doing a whole run that way (use a small amount, like enough for two trays at the most).


Edited by TVCasualty, 09 June 2021 - 12:30 PM.


#3 VibrationalAlchemy

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Posted 09 June 2021 - 01:07 PM

I would advise against it.

 

You would be introducing a nutrient source that is non-selective (unlike manure). Pasteurizing manure hydrated with water from soaked grains would be sufficient to kill off whatever came along in the water but the problem is that the nutrients present in the water (the reason you want to do this, I'm guessing) would strongly encourage contaminant spores to sprout and grow as soon as it cooled off. And I mean spores endemic in the air. There's no way to avoid them.

 

The reason why we spawn with whole grain and get away with it is that the grain is fully colonized first, which affords it a strong degree of protection from contamination (the mycelium protects itself fairly well once it fully colonizes a food source).

 

If you try it, try it with a small test batch before doing a whole run that way (use a small amount, like enough for two trays at the most).

 

 

Yeah, I see what you're sayin... Noted.

 

It seems like it would be good to have the uppermost layer (when spawning to bulk) be pasteurized manure that does not have the rye water added.  Then it would act as a sort of barrier to what is below.  Then anything that settles it would not immediately come into contact with the non-selective nutrients.  I realize it could very well still gather things from the air in the mere process of spawning, but while the sub is just sitting there colonizing it could be potentially helpful.  Anyway, I will probably pass on this round, but I do want to play with it in the future.

 

Thanks for the informative reply.


Edited by VibrationalAlchemy, 09 June 2021 - 01:13 PM.

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