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#1 SquareGrowing

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Posted 14 December 2021 - 03:48 PM

I'm still pretty new to mycology and to this site.  I got to thinking about how to track and learn from my grows.  

 

What I'm confused about is how to keep up with genetics.  For example, I clone a fruit to agar and isolate.  Then I spawn with isolated genetics and that is the second generation, I think.  When those genetics are fruited and cloned, that becomes third generation...maybe?  

 

Starting to log my grows, I thought the following would be most important:

- Strain/Species

- Spawn Method (i.e. media)

- Spawn to Bulk Method & Conditions

- Fruiting Conditions

- Dates for everything

- Photos & Notes 

- Maybe Humidity and Temp in the future

 

Any suggestions or previous discussions that I missed?

How do you log your grows or do you even bother?

Any "best practices" or "standard naming conventions" that would apply?

 

"Hello, friends.  I'm Square and I'm a nerd."   :meditate:

 

Thanks for all the advice and information that you guys share.  I'm glad I found this community!



#2 Baphom3t

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Posted 14 December 2021 - 05:32 PM

Have you ever grown before?
If your new to growing and the site and start with cloning as your first grow, you got bigger balls than most people I know here when they started.

Maybe you're a savant, who knows, but if it's your first ever grow I suggest slowing down and starting with PF / BRF TEK and get the hang of what cultivation entails.
There is a great guide for beginners and whoever over here ---> https://mycotopia.ne...for-the-masses/
You have to do some research on your own. Everything you need to know to get started is there in the PDF of the link. 
Photos and notes are up to you to write. Dates are written on the day you do what you need to do.
One more thing.... Don't over think the process.

 


Edited by Baphom3t, 14 December 2021 - 05:34 PM.

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#3 coorsmikey

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Posted 14 December 2021 - 06:57 PM


What I'm confused about is how to keep up with genetics. For example, I clone a fruit to agar and isolate. Then I spawn with isolated genetics and that is the second generation, I think. When those genetics are fruited and cloned, that becomes third generation...maybe?
 

Spore to fruit/spores is a generation. So basically speaking when two spores germinate and then exchange genetic information, that is going to be a generation until a new one is started again by the offspring spore resulting from that generation. You could clone a generation 1 over and over and its still just a clone in which to make things more simpler to grasp, we just call it a Transfer from here. When you transfer mycelium from you isolate you are take the same genetic and generation and expanding it to another substrate. Still the same genes and generation even if you are transferring from a fruitbody. It's when you take spores from resulting from Gen1 to start a successive colony is when you would now be working with a second generation.

A good example I have is a strain that is albino and doesn't produce viable spore very often. I really like this strain and want to keep it around but I can't get a spore print and don't have a ton of time to swab every fruit to see if I can get some viable spores. So I do transfers and always keep the same generation going (sometimes for years). My transfer from my first Petri dish to another was label T1. The next transfer to more dishes was label T2. Now T2 was split up on to grain and more dishes labeled T3. Well you could see how that could go on forever and to make things simpler in my mind, if I was clone from a fruit I would just start back over at T1 again. So for how ever long I am am working with this strain, its still the same generation until I get two viable spores to mate and give me a second generation.


Edited by coorsmikey, 14 December 2021 - 07:05 PM.

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#4 Arathu

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Posted 14 December 2021 - 09:14 PM

Welcome to Mycotopia....I'm glad that you like our community here....... We are also quite fond of the place....

 

I really like to call it the New Library at Alexandria........so for a deep dive go to the vaults and read until you cannot consume any more..........

 

There are also many active threads in several different area's....find your niche and scratch your itch...

 

But you'll just be scratching the surface of the conversations and threads captured here......

 

From one nerd to another.....take the PF TEK advice and start right there, so while you satisfy the intellectual needs and studies.......

 

You get your first fruits and build a little stash.....as you expand and grow.....from generation to generation.... :meditate:

 

A



#5 SquareGrowing

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Posted 16 December 2021 - 09:53 AM

 

What I'm confused about is how to keep up with genetics. For example, I clone a fruit to agar and isolate. Then I spawn with isolated genetics and that is the second generation, I think. When those genetics are fruited and cloned, that becomes third generation...maybe?
 

Spore to fruit/spores is a generation. So basically speaking when two spores germinate and then exchange genetic information, that is going to be a generation until a new one is started again by the offspring spore resulting from that generation. You could clone a generation 1 over and over and its still just a clone in which to make things more simpler to grasp, we just call it a Transfer from here. When you transfer mycelium from you isolate you are take the same genetic and generation and expanding it to another substrate. Still the same genes and generation even if you are transferring from a fruitbody. It's when you take spores from resulting from Gen1 to start a successive colony is when you would now be working with a second generation.

A good example I have is a strain that is albino and doesn't produce viable spore very often. I really like this strain and want to keep it around but I can't get a spore print and don't have a ton of time to swab every fruit to see if I can get some viable spores. So I do transfers and always keep the same generation going (sometimes for years). My transfer from my first Petri dish to another was label T1. The next transfer to more dishes was label T2. Now T2 was split up on to grain and more dishes labeled T3. Well you could see how that could go on forever and to make things simpler in my mind, if I was clone from a fruit I would just start back over at T1 again. So for how ever long I am am working with this strain, its still the same generation until I get two viable spores to mate and give me a second generation.

 

 

Thanks for the explanation!  I was missing the transfer vs generation verbiage.  This makes more sense now.

 

I do have a couple of grows worth of experience which only got me more excited.  The hobby is very seductive and there are plenty of areas to explore.  Currently, I feel like I have outgrown Uncle Ben and moving to PF and grain for my next adventure.  I'm getting set up to start exploring genetics and have read a ton on Mycotopia (thanks for the contributions!).  So, I'll report back when I have something to contribute myself.

 

Thanks again for taking the time.






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