Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Fasting, sugar, and hydration


  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#1 FLASHINGROOSTER

FLASHINGROOSTER

    Semi-Pro Taco Robot

  • Black VIP
  • 3,322 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 26 January 2022 - 04:29 PM

So I think sometime around april last year I finally won the mental battle with myself and decided to button down and seriously try to loose some weight. I started doing a ketogenic based diet by cutting out carbs. One could make arguments about what diet type is best for them but for me this one appeared to be a great tool for weight loss and then control.  Learned some educational things like the fact that sugars are under the carb heading on your nutritional information, something I mostly skipped over in the past, perhaps would look at the fat content as they provided you a percentage to think about your daily intake. However there does not appear to be as clear of indication with our relationship to carbs. It is a little more complex. For that reason we can think of fiber as a neutral carb or something that you can sort of subtract from the net carb count and then get better understanding of what you are eating.

 

So say if something has 20 grams of carbs but ten grams of that were fiber and the other ten were sugar, you could consider that as around ten carbs of the recommended daily intake. I noticed that is how they often make low sugar candy, with insoluble sugar alcohols or fiber

 

Anywhoo if your a stubborn fool like me you might have scoffed when "health nut hippies" tried to talk about cutting sugar out and the benefits they would see from it. I mean it was often described as a miracle cure, weight loss, clearer thinking, more energy, more stable mood ect. It is hard to describe but now over a course of the year I would tend to agree with some of those assessments. I would describe the feeling like when I got my sleep apnia machine. It was not as if I noticed some immediate benefit, thought to myself yeah I feel better, I think. It was more noticeable when I stopped doing the good thing. That is when I really started to notice the difference in days where I was not using it. So fast forward the clock into november december and I was basically back to eating everything again, the true keto is not sustainable and that is okay I have come to think of it like a healthy eating guideline that does not need to be followed so diligently. When the scale starts ticking up hard again well that means it is time to get a little harder on cutting again.

 

One of the things I started doing was fasting, combined with keto they work well together as essentially their main incentive is to deprive the body of glucose which I have learned has some interesting outcomes. One being rapid water loss. I used to blame all that water gain after a huge bowl of popcorn on the salt content, however now realize it was more about glucose and that it uses water to store it in your muscles. I can drop ten pounds in a 30 hour period if I skip eating. Eat some sugar and you body sucks all that water right back up again. So if you want to look good in your bathing suit this actually works temporarily as long as you keep your glucose down. As well you often hear people talk about the miracle diet of cabbage soup or whatever odd diet,  "my husband lost ten pounds in a week! wow!" The water loss is basically all they are capitalizing on, temporary water loss due to low glucose levels, not actual fat or muscle tissue. The reality of weight loss or gain on average is closer to one or two pounds a week in most cases. Of course they are exceptions

 

The Christmas candy chased me right into January and I have been eating pretty horrible again. Still fasting but the healthy eating has been replaced by poor eating (chocolate, candy, chips and crackers) with one good meal in the day to trick myself.  The end result I cant help but feel is not good. Not sure how to describe it, like some light mental fog, difficulty in paying attention and feeling stress about doing maintenance's.

 

So last night I decided fuck it time for a 24-30 hour fast. What a great tool for resetting myself.  Around the six or seven mark at night is the fight. There are a couple hours there that are hard to get through, but I know that if I win the battle shortly the hunger will all but subside. I wake up the next day and hunger is not there. I even had trouble sleeping last night because I felt an energy boost and mental clarity. Is this placebo, perhaps, but I have gotten to the point where it feels hard to manage my weight in any other way. Only after one evening and the now the sugar cravings have subsided, it is amazing how quickly that can flip. Last week I was often eating chocolate in my bed in the dark half asleep.For me It feels empowering to be able to control your hunger and not be a slave to food, not something I was ever very successful at doing.

 

The fasting feels like this little challenge thing I can put myself to, and the results seem almost instantaneous. Feeling better today for sure. Time to go cook up some pork chops and potatoes, no candy though, the mind is ready for a break from it

 

If anything I would challenge anyone to try a day of fasting and see how you feel, or even just try fasting until the late afternoon to get started. Although I feel like you really wont notice the stronger positive side effects until you go to bed one day without eating.

 

It's only one day right what could go wrong?


Edited by FLASHINGROOSTER, 26 January 2022 - 04:34 PM.

  • coorsmikey and Juthro like this

#2 Cuboid

Cuboid

    Mycophiliac

  • Black VIP
  • 859 posts

Posted 29 January 2022 - 07:47 AM

I could have written most of the above about myself. I've struggled with my weight for 15yrs or more (mostly since I quit smoking) and in all that time the only thing that has ever worked for me is low carb / almost no sugar diet. I've never been good enough at it to claim a ketogenic diet but that's what I aim towards. Did that for a year or 2 and got my blood sugar down enough to no longer qualify as T2 diabetic, then last year did some fasting. Was getting into 1 day a week I'd fast and that really flipped a switch for weight loss.
Then I got really ill in December (side effect of a medication I've been on for a lot of yrs for something not directly related to weight) and spent a while in hospital not in control of what I could eat, got home just in time for Christmas and all its carb rich treats. The miracle is I didn't put more weight on than I did but its been a big set back. I'm struggling to get back to my previous diet habits and currently a bit scared to do the fasting due to fragile health.
I don't go around telling everyone they should go low carb as I don't believe it's gonna be right for everyone. There's no one size fits all when it comes people's diet and health. But I'm pretty sure low carb would be healthy for a majority of the population esp. T2 diabetics. I've not seen any convincing evidence that there is another really effective way to reverse the insulin resistance.

Best of luck getting back to what you know works for you Rooster.

Regards,
Cuboid.
  • Juthro and FLASHINGROOSTER like this

#3 rockyfungus

rockyfungus

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 2,347 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 29 January 2022 - 12:08 PM

With all the literature pointing towards carbs/sugar being the real killer. It’s the best approach.

I stumbled upon this type of diet just by listening to my body and feelings. I tend to run best on high protein and fat.
  • FLASHINGROOSTER likes this

#4 shiftingshadows

shiftingshadows

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 533 posts

Posted 03 February 2022 - 11:47 PM

I'm putting my bet on this approach, so far it seems to be working, but it is not an instant makeover, and takes planing and commitment, time will tell....

 

[Direct Link]



#5 rockyfungus

rockyfungus

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 2,347 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 05 February 2022 - 06:39 AM

How can you tell someone is vegan?

The vegan diet seems fundamentally flawed to me. We are omnivores, full stop. Vegan diets use a ton of butter and salt to make up for the fact your missing real food.
Let alone all the essential amino acids and compounds only found in plant eaters (AKA MEAT)

The diet is awful for myself. Most vegans I know have a multitude of health issues from improper diets. Need supplements and extra sources of these things that come from meat.
Vegan diets really are a curse and a blessing from a green point of view. Yeah less cows and methane. Bad more almonds and avocados hogging water.

 

Instead of having to sit through a video what is the takeaway?


Edited by rockyfungus, 05 February 2022 - 07:08 AM.

  • Juthro likes this

#6 shiftingshadows

shiftingshadows

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 533 posts

Posted 06 February 2022 - 01:06 AM

rockyfungus, you seem to have already made up your mind.

I am not in the business of proselytizing.

It makes sense to me, and anyone with an interest, would discover there are many variations, within the categories of both raw, vegan, "8-10-10 diet", 'plant based', "SOS diet", etc., and Nutritarian diets.

Many are also frightened of fasting, and worry about protein, but can't define what protein is, and so on, and on.

I am not interested in either arguing or proselytizing, anything.

Some might find the video interesting and some not.

It's all ok with me.

 

Nothing to "sit thru":

 

Frank .png

 

just one click:

 

raw + vegan + bodybuilders - images:

 

https://duckduckgo.c...ages&iax=images

 

I'm not a body builder, but whatever floats your boat


Edited by shiftingshadows, 06 February 2022 - 03:01 AM.


#7 rockyfungus

rockyfungus

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 2,347 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 06 February 2022 - 02:30 PM

Sorry if I come off as condescending.

"Some aspects of the 80/10/10 Diet may help you lose weight and lower your risk of certain diseases. However, many health benefits are exaggerated and lack strong scientific evidence."

I have not made of my mind. I just don't see any science proving that it's better from an ecological standpoint, dietary, or monetary reasons.

 

That bodybuilder won't win any competitions as everyone else is jacked on steroids and meat...

Proteins are made up of amino acids. Amino acids being organic compounds with various sidechains changing their function.

Would you like me to go into the various enzymes involved with the process called translation?

 

Didn't we argue before about essential and non-essential amino acids?

Vegans or people talking about it are fucking annoying, they barge in whenever they can. Hey you know jesus? There's no place in this conversation for it. Unless someone's a big fruit eater.

Also creatine where you getting that without meat?

Fasting is all you fucking need. Tons of studies on the biology of dying (AKA AGING). It's called caloric restriction, full stop.


Edited by rockyfungus, 06 February 2022 - 02:40 PM.

  • coorsmikey likes this

#8 shiftingshadows

shiftingshadows

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 533 posts

Posted 10 February 2022 - 03:25 AM

"Didn't we argue before about essential and non-essential amino acids?"

 

No we didn't. Neither in this thread or anywhere else.

 

The thread was started by FLASHINGROOSTER , as follows:

"So I think sometime around april last year I finally won the mental battle with myself and decided to button down and seriously try to loose some weight. I started doing a ketogenic based diet by cutting out carbs. "...etc

 

So I shared what I am doing, and all I said was:

"I'm putting my bet on this approach, so far it seems to be working, but it is not an instant makeover, and takes planing and commitment, time will tell...."

and included a video of a pretty lady relating how a similar diet, to what I'm experimenting with, helped her.

 

I don't know if I'd call your replies "condescending", but they do seem unnecessarily emotional with an angry tone.

Especial considering nothing was aimed at you, or for that matter anyone else, and no claims were made, or agendas proclaimed, in fact, the phrase I used made that very explicit: "time will tell..."

 

I could theorize about the source of (what seems to me) your anger (but don't wish to be condescending or presumptuous and could be wrong in my assumptions), and in any case, I don't choose to take it personally, or indulge in such feelings, if I can help it, as they seem to me, to be ultimately painful, and lead to more of the same.


Edited by shiftingshadows, 10 February 2022 - 03:38 AM.


#9 ElPirana

ElPirana

    Mycotopiate

  • Gold VIP
  • 1,152 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 10 February 2022 - 08:16 AM

 
Didn't we argue before about essential and non-essential amino acids?

The essential amino acids came up in my other thread a while back: https://mycotopia.ne...-8#entry1490941

Turns out there are a number of plant based foods that have all essential amino acids. So as long as you eat the right types of foods, you can still get complete proteins. I don’t know about anyone else here, but I eat lots of quinoa every day, among other foods.

To tell the truth, I think I was more malnourished back when I was eating the typical American shitty diet that included meats than what I’m eating now.

Also to stay on topic with this thread…sugars are the devil. Sweets are like a wolf in sheep’s clothing. I eat complex carbs everyday though and don’t have any problems with them, including reducing body fat. Just my own anecdotal observations.
  • FLASHINGROOSTER likes this

#10 FLASHINGROOSTER

FLASHINGROOSTER

    Semi-Pro Taco Robot

  • Black VIP
  • 3,322 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 10 February 2022 - 05:04 PM

I would say I realistically only went a month or two on strict keto. Back to eating everything again and the weight has not bounced back too hard yet, maybe two or three pounds. If I eat like a pig on the weekend it usually inspires a fast on monday. I might make it I might not, I don't stress out about it too much. Last one I was having trouble falling asleep, woke up and zombie ate some peanut butter and honey, that seemed to fix me up. Wake up the next day and don't really feel hungry, its a strange sensation

 

All I can share about the Vegan diets is an anecdote. I know a woman that tried it, in fact it was her that told me how much better she felt when she restricted her diet and cut out sugar. In the end though she had difficulty in maintaining her health on strict vegan. I believe after some discussion with her doctor she started eating fish again. That is only one story though right. I think people need to find what works for them, not sure I believe in a one size fits all approach to eating habits. I would like to hear how you make out shadow and I wish you the best of luck in your search

 

 Jordan Peterson and his daughter eat an all meat diet because they found that it dramatically reduced all these serious health issues that they were having, he said he finds it terrible to only eat meat but it has incredible results for the two of them in particular. The daughter specifically ate only lamb as she found it worked best. Not something I would attempt, considering my experiences with lack of fiber in keto was enough to deal with. All meat sounds extreme but hey if it works what can you say.

 

I suppose that being said. I think its pretty safe to say that reducing sugar is a big step towards good eating habits. Nothing new really, the advice we often hear form health experts. Reducing those chips and pops and chocolate bars that do nothing to fill you up, but they do jack your calorie count way up. Failing to plan meals is usually what gets me into junky eating.


Edited by FLASHINGROOSTER, 10 February 2022 - 05:06 PM.


#11 shiftingshadows

shiftingshadows

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 533 posts

Posted 10 February 2022 - 05:36 PM

FLASHINTGROOSTER if you want up to date evidence based data, on Plant Based eating and nutrition. Here is a list of mainly MDs who have researched the subject, published books, and many have both websites and free videos on Youtube:

Dr. Michael Klaper
Neal D. Barnard, M.D.
John A. McDougall, M.D.
Dean Michael Ornish, M.D., cardiologist
Joel Fuhrman, M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D.
Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn
T. Colin Campbell Ph.D. (1961), biochemistry, nutrition, and microbiology, Cornell University
Garth Davis, MD
(who are these Docs?* references below * )

Incidentally one can be 'vegan' or 'raw' etc. and still eat a terrible diet, and many do. New research comes out constantly.
The importance of phytonutrients is a relatively new discovery.
https://duckduckgo.c...nts&t=h_&ia=web

As regards: "I would say I realistically only went a month or two on strict keto. "

you might find something here of interest:

https://nutritionfacts.org/?s=keto

* The Doctors bios & references sort of thing:
Michael A. Klaper (July 19, 1947) is an American physician, vegan health educator and conference and event speaker, and an author of articles and books of vegan medical advice. He advocates rearing children on vegan diets throughhout their entire lifetimes, beginning with the vegan mother's pregnancy.
—— —— —— —— ——
Dr. Michael Klaper currently serves on the staff of the TrueNorth Health Center in Santa Rosa, California, a nutritionally-based medical clinic specializing in therapeutic fasting and health improvement through a whole-foods, plant-based diet. He also contributed to the making of two PBS television programs, Food for Thought and the award-winning Diet for a New America movie based on the book of the same name by author John Robbins. Please visit http://www.plantpurenation.com to learn more about PlantPure and its whole food plant-based (WFPB) meals, as well as its efforts to help grow the plant-based lifestyle movement. #goplantpure
———————————
Neal D. Barnard, M.D., F.A.C.C., is an American author, clinical researcher, and founding president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (P
Biography
Barnard was born in July 1953 and grew up in Fargo, North Dakota, the son and grandson of physicians. He received his medical training at George Washington University School of Medicine in psychiatry, where he began to explore vegan diets.[6]
He founded Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) in 1985 because he "wanted to promote preventative medicine." By 2016, the Washington D.C.-based PCRM had 150,000 members, including 12,000 physicians and reported revenues of more than $20 million. Barnard has written for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and is often cited by the organization.
He appeared in the 2011 documentary feature film Forks Over Knives, a film that traces the careers of T. Colin Campbell and Caldwell Esselstyn.
Barnard serves as an Adjunct Associate Professor of Medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine. He founded the Barnard Medical Center in 2015 as part of PCRM, and it opened in 2016 with him as president; the center provides primary care and emphasizes diet and preventative medicine.
Barnard is a non-practicing psychiatrist, and plays cello, guitar and keyboards and has been in bands Pop Maru, Verdun, and Carbonworks.
——————————————————
John A. McDougall (born May 17, 1947) is an American physician and author who is the co-founder, chairman, and sole board member of San Francisco–based Dr. McDougall's Right Foods Inc. He has written a number of diet books advocating the consumption of low-fat, starchy food. His diet—The McDougall Plan
——————————————————
Dean Michael Ornish (born July 16, 1953) is an American physician and researcher. He is the president and founder of the nonprofit Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California and a Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.
he is a well-known advocate for using diet and lifestyle changes to treat and prevent heart disease.
http://deanornish.com/
The author of :
Dr. Dean Ornish's Program for Reversing Heart Disease New York: Random House, 1990; Ballantine Books, 1992. ISBN 978-0804110389
Eat More, Weigh Less New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1993, ISBN 978-0060170189
Everyday Cooking with Dr. Dean Ornish New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1996, ISBN 978-0060173142
Love & Survival: The Scientific Basis for the Healing Power of Intimacy New York: HarperCollins, 1998.ISBN 978-0060930202
The Spectrum New York: Ballantine Books, 2008. ISBN 978-0345496317
UnDo It! with Anne Ornish. New York: Ballantine Books, 2019. ISBN 9780525479970
————————————————————
Joel Fuhrman, M.D. (born December 2, 1953) is an American celebrity doctor who advocates what he calls a micronutrient-rich diet.
A former competitive figure skater, he suffered a serious injury which removed him from competition. He says an alternative medicine therapy helped speed his recovery and led him to become a physician. His practice is based on his nutrition-based approach to obesity and chronic disease, also referred to as a nutritarian or restrictive diet,as well as promoting his products and books. He has written several books promoting his dietary approaches and sells a related line of nutrition related products. As of April 2013, his book Eat to Live was on the New York Times bestseller paperback Advice & Misc. list for 90 weeks.
————————————————————
Michael Greger M.D.
His first book: “How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease” became an instant New York Times Best Seller.

Born October 25, 1972 (age 46)[1][2]
Education
Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Tufts University School of Medicine
Medical career
Profession General practitioner
Field Clinical nutrition
Website DrGreger.org https://nutritionfacts.org/
A founding member and Fellow of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, Michael Greger, MD, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized speaker on nutrition, food safety, and public health issues. He has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, testified before Congress, and was invited as an expert witness in the defense of Oprah Winfrey in the infamous "meat defamation" trial. In 2017, Dr. Greger was honored with the ACLM Lifestyle Medicine Trailblazer Award. He is a graduate of Cornell University School of Agriculture and Tufts University School of Medicine. His first book How Not to Die became an instant New York Times Best Seller. All proceeds he receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements is all donated to charity.
Michael Herschel Greger M.D. (born October 25, 1972) is an American physician, author, and professional speaker on public health issues, particularly the benefits of a whole-food, plant-based diet and the harms of eating animal products. He is a vegan.
Contents
• 1 Career
• 2 Publications
• 3 References
• 4 External links
Career
Greger went to college at Cornell University School of Agriculture, where as a junior he wrote informally about the dangers of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, commonly known as mad cow disease, on a website he published in 1994.In the same year, he was hired to work on mad cow issues for Farm Sanctuary, near Cornell, and became a vegan after touring a stockyard as part of his work with Farm Sanctuary. In 1998, he appeared as an expert witness testifying about bovine spongiform encephalopathy when cattle producers unsuccessfully sued Oprah Winfrey for libel over statements she had made about the safety of meat in 1996.
He enrolled in Tufts University School of Medicine, originally for its MD/PhD program, but he withdrew from the dual-degree program to pursue only the medical degree. He graduated in 1999 as a general practitioner specializing in clinical nutrition. In 2001, he joined Organic Consumers Association to work on mad cow issues, on which he spoke widely as cases of mad cow appeared in the US and Canada, calling mad cow "The Plague of the 21st Century."
In 2004, he launched a website and published a book critical of the Atkins Diet and other low carb diets.
In 2004, the American College Of Lifestyle Medicine was formed in Loma Linda, and Greger was a founding member as one of the first hundred people to join the organization.
In 2005, he joined the farm animal welfare division of the Humane Society as director of public health and animal agriculture. In 2008, he testified before Congress after the Humane Society released its undercover video of the Westland Meat Packing Company, which showed downer animals entering the meat supply, and which led to the USDA forcing the recall of 143 million pounds of beef, some of which had been routed into the nation's school lunch program.
In 2011, he founded the website NutritionFacts.org with funding from the Jesse & Julie Rasch Foundation.
In his lectures, videos, and writings about nutrition, he tries to persuade people to change their eating habits from a Western pattern diet to a whole-food, plant-based diet, which he says can prevent and reverse many chronic diseases. He is critical of some other doctors for not encouraging their patients to adopt plant-based diets and to avoid animal-based products and criticizes the US government for giving watered-down advice about healthy eating in its guidelines, in order to protect the economic interests of food producers—especially those who make junk food and animal-based food.
Retired physician Harriet A. Hall, who is known as a skeptic in the medical community, has written that, while it is well-accepted that it is more healthy to eat a plant-based diet than a typical Western diet, Greger often overstates the known benefits of such a diet as well as the harm caused by eating animal products (for example, in a talk, he claimed that a single meal rich in animal products can "cripple" one's arteries), and he sometimes does not discuss evidence that contradicts his strong claims.
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Caldwell Blakeman Esselstyn Jr. (born December 12, 1933)[1] is an American physician, author and former Olympic rowing champion.

Esselstyn is the author of the award-winning Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease (2007), in which he argued for a low-fat, whole foods, plant-based diet that avoids all animal products and oils, as well as reducing or avoiding soybeans, nuts and avocados. The diet has been advocated by former U.S. President Bill Clinton.
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
T. Colin Campbell
https://nutritionstudies.org/
Thomas Colin Campbell (born March 14, 1934) is an American biochemist who specializes in the effect of nutrition on long-term health. He is the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor Emeritus of Nutritional Biochemistry at Cornell University.

Campbell has become known for his advocacy of a low-fat, whole foods, plant-based diet. He is the author of over 300 research papers and three books,
The China Study (2005, co-authored with his son, Thomas M. Campbell II, which became one of America's best-selling books about nutrition), Whole (2013) and The Low-Carb Fraud (2014).[1]
Campbell featured in the 2011 American documentary Forks Over Knives.

Campbell was one of the lead scientists of the China–Cornell–Oxford Project on diet and disease, set up in 1983 by Cornell University, the University of Oxford, and the Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine to explore the relationship between nutrition and cancer, heart, and metabolic diseases. The study was described by The New York Times as "the Grand Prix of epidemiology".[2]

Born March 14, 1934 (age 84)
United States
Education B.S. (1956), pre-veterinary medicine, Pennsylvania State University
Veterinary school, one year, University of Georgia
M.S. (1958), nutrition and biochemistry, Cornell University
Ph.D. (1961), biochemistry, nutrition, and microbiology, Cornell University
Occupation Nutritional biochemist
Notable work
The China Study (2005)
Relatives Thomas M. Campbell, Keith E. Campbell, Nelson Campbell (sons)
Website T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Garth Davis, MD, is the medical director of the Davis Clinic at the Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas, and starred on the hit TLC show Big Medicine. He is certified by the American Board of Surgery and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a Fellow of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.
….Dr. Davis als
….the author of Proteinaholic: How Our Obsession With Meat Is Killing Us and What We Can Do About It.

Edited by shiftingshadows, 10 February 2022 - 05:39 PM.


#12 FLASHINGROOSTER

FLASHINGROOSTER

    Semi-Pro Taco Robot

  • Black VIP
  • 3,322 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 10 February 2022 - 06:51 PM

I love fruits and veggies. Roasted vegetables are fantastic

 

As far as all the data, no thanks, I don't have any interest in pursing a vegan diet or lifestyle. I wish you all the best in your lifestyle choice


  • rockyfungus and shiftingshadows like this

#13 FLASHINGROOSTER

FLASHINGROOSTER

    Semi-Pro Taco Robot

  • Black VIP
  • 3,322 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 February 2022 - 10:49 AM

Every once in a while I do like to go for a vegetarian or mostly plant based meal

 

Curious if you guys have a favorite go to recipe that one could share?


Edited by FLASHINGROOSTER, 12 February 2022 - 10:49 AM.


#14 shiftingshadows

shiftingshadows

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 533 posts

Posted 12 February 2022 - 05:18 PM

Decide on a category, and if no one here has ideas, there are thousands on you tube, for every category from no oil salad dressings, to whatever.

I am interested in even more "radical" diet ***, than raw vegan, so I'm not of much help here.

 

*** this sort of thing

https://www.youtube....NRbkcbzC71s8DIw

if I was young, rich, and free I would go here

https://tanglewoodwellnesscenter.com/

But I ain't young, rich, and free...

So it's Trader Joes (Grocery chain in the US), for me & not Costa Rica


Edited by shiftingshadows, 12 February 2022 - 05:19 PM.


#15 FLASHINGROOSTER

FLASHINGROOSTER

    Semi-Pro Taco Robot

  • Black VIP
  • 3,322 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 February 2022 - 06:52 PM

Lets say any one pot meal. Something cooked.



#16 shiftingshadows

shiftingshadows

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 533 posts

Posted 12 February 2022 - 09:56 PM

what's nice about youtube is you get demos, not just recipes , here they are (possibly hundreds, as many videos seem to contain more than one recipe) :

 

https://www.youtube....y=one pot meals


Edited by shiftingshadows, 12 February 2022 - 10:01 PM.


#17 rockyfungus

rockyfungus

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 2,347 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 February 2022 - 10:32 PM

Shifting, Trader Joes is amazing at the price point and the frozen Indian meals can't be beat. If you are vegan check out the Channa.

 

You lazy like me, hate cooking.
Chickpeas lately. Get a curry you like and simmer the peas and rice at the same time. Throw in the curry at the end and anything else.

 

Beans, pork shoulder (butt), mushrooms, veggies. Roasting herbs too. Rice that up, taco it up.

Artichoke is sometimes worth the effort.

I find drinking sparkling water curbs my carbonation/sugar needs. Find a flavor you like stick with it. Magically it's not the works thinking of orange in the water. Need to starve that sugar beast. My lady is on ~5 days. She's notcing more flavor and she can grab a key lime sparkling instead of a nasty Dew.
Now go treat yourself to your favorite sweet. It's too much! It sucks but your stomach adjust


Edited by rockyfungus, 12 February 2022 - 10:36 PM.

  • FLASHINGROOSTER likes this

#18 shiftingshadows

shiftingshadows

    Mycotopiate

  • Free Member
  • 533 posts

Posted 13 February 2022 - 12:39 AM

" Need to starve that sugar beast. "

 

I just did a short fast. And put up with a few headaches as I quit coffee  at the same time - but its a quick way to get the junk out of the system.

However long term results may also depend on psychology, habits, commitment, goals, planing ahead for how to deal with temptation, and environment etc.

 

these videos probably explain the cause, and possibly ways to deal with the sugar beast.

 

https://www.youtube....sugar addiction

https://www.youtube....e trap dr lisle

 

As  regards chickpeas, I sprout them, put spices in tahini & water, to make  dressing, and eat them in salad; i'm too lazy to clean cooking dishes.  :smile:


Edited by shiftingshadows, 13 February 2022 - 12:45 AM.

  • FLASHINGROOSTER and rockyfungus like this

#19 ElPirana

ElPirana

    Mycotopiate

  • Gold VIP
  • 1,152 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 February 2022 - 09:38 AM

Every once in a while I do like to go for a vegetarian or mostly plant based meal

 

Curious if you guys have a favorite go to recipe that one could share?

Here's one I make pretty much every week.  It's my own version of a mung bean curry.  This version is super easy, tastes very good and is very healthy.

 

Add one tbsp cumin seeds to 2-3 tbsp coconut oil in a pot, toast the cumin seeds.

Add four cups water, 2 tbsp coriander, 2 tbsp ginger, 1 tsp turmeric, 1 tsp salt and 1 cup mung beans.  (add other spices you like, sometimes I buy a pre-mixed curry spice that is a nice change.)

Bring up to a boil then reduce to simmer until the beans are soft. 

You have to add a little water at the end to keep it from burning, as the beans near the end they really soak up all the moisture.

Once the beans are cooked, add one can of coconut milk.

Bring back up to just starting to boil and then turn off the heat.  Done!

 

You can eat it with rice or whatever you like.  I make quinoa in place of rice, you get a lot of nutrients from quinoa if you go this route.  I also like to get some flatbread to eat with it too, I found a whole grain flatbread at the store that is good.


  • FLASHINGROOSTER and rockyfungus like this

#20 FLASHINGROOSTER

FLASHINGROOSTER

    Semi-Pro Taco Robot

  • Black VIP
  • 3,322 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 February 2022 - 09:53 AM

Those do sound good, and my bean game is fairly weak so good suggestions thank you. Curry seems like a good choice for those type of dishes to me... another game of mine that is weak.

 

I smoke a ton of weed so sometimes my symptoms can be hard to pinpoint but I swear there is this moment where I feel sick in the mornings sometimes. I used to blame it on too much green tea and weed but now I wonder if that is the moment when your body is low on glucose and has to shift. To give some history I have been doing a very basic form of fasting for longer than I realized. It was out of pure laziness of not wanting to make a lunch, the times I did my stoned ass would always zombie eat it before the morning anyway. Then feeling like I was wasting money going for the store bought lunch. Work started to get slower and it became, well I will be home by right after lunch anyway what's the point. So I started skipping lunch, it was not until I read that not eating might not actually be so bad for you. Considering most diets caution against going below a certain calorie restriction. After I felt comfortable not eating it all sort of clicked. Thinking to myself, nope you already had that cheeseburger three months ago, your body is breaking down the fat cells for that burger right now, your good mate, you have spent years eating everything in sight.

 

Super bowl  is going to be poor eating, I can almost do it guilt free If I think to myself, ahh no big deal you can fast later on in the week to compensate

 

If anyone is saying to themselves, I would like to reduce sugar but its really good well I feel those sentiments. All it takes is a crack in the wall, start with something simple where you feel you can drop it. Like in your morning coffee. Within a month if you stick with it I almost guarantee your first cup with sugar again will taste like a syrup drink. It is a constant battle for me, but there appears to be a bit of a barrier your minds forms, the more sugar you eat usually the more you crave it


Edited by FLASHINGROOSTER, 13 February 2022 - 09:56 AM.

  • ElPirana and rockyfungus like this




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!