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Casing mix ?


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#1 marmy

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Posted 28 March 2022 - 09:25 AM

I ran out of coir a while back and got some sphagnum. . Then i was able to get some more coir, although a different brand.

My current mix is about 35 vermiculite, maybe 40 coir and 15 sphagnum with a cup of calcium carbonate.
So i am trying to figure out some inconsistency in my tubs.

If i were being truly scientific, i am sure i would use one strain and try all sorts of different conditions. So yes, strain is a variable.

For example, i had a tub of classic pe and after nice first flush and dunk, i recased, then nothing. The mycelium seemed to die maybe. Or just lackluster recoloning. The first casing seemed robust. Although I can't remember if i really sprayed off the top layer of mycelium while filing tub.

Is spraying off the top layer a deal breaker? It seems to be. But i don't have enough data to confirm.
I just also don't know if there may be something wrong with my mix? Can coir come sprayed with any any fungals?
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#2 Mycol

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Posted 30 March 2022 - 07:44 AM

Hmmm I don’t use coir in my casing but I do in my sub . My casing is seed starter and coarse verm 2:1 and add a cup of crushed oyster shells and a teaspoon of pickling lime . Bring that up to almost field capacity and PC .

My PE more often than not will colonize that casing too . But would still give me great flushes on my monos.

I wouldn’t typically remist either i would dunk and pour off the excess .

Idk about coir being sprayed with anti fungal

#3 BirdsArentReal

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Posted 30 March 2022 - 01:15 PM

I dont have an answer to your question, rather a question of my own.. Since you mentioned it, why do you use a casing layer? I thought the general consensus for cubes was that a casing layer was unnecessary. Does this not apply to PE? I'll admit, I've almost exclusively grown B+ or very similar strains. 



#4 ElPirana

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Posted 30 March 2022 - 02:15 PM

I dont have an answer to your question, rather a question of my own.. Since you mentioned it, why do you use a casing layer? I thought the general consensus for cubes was that a casing layer was unnecessary. Does this not apply to PE? I'll admit, I've almost exclusively grown B+ or very similar strains.

The general consensus seems to be that cubes don’t need a casing, but that they tend to do better with one. My experience matches that, I’ve grown with and without a casing and have had poor results without. It probably also depends greatly on maintaining ideal fruiting conditions, i.e. whether you’re fruiting in a tub, bag, martha, etc

I’ve never tried growing PE w/out a casing, but have read numerous comments over the years that they will only fruit with a casing.

Edited by ElPirana, 30 March 2022 - 02:18 PM.

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#5 YoshiTrainer

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Posted 30 March 2022 - 06:49 PM

At one time, you had to worry about salts in your blocks of COIR from the pet store. It was advised to soak and squeeze a few times with fresh water before using in plants. I think most COIR now, especially plant grade, you don't have to worry about that.

I tend to case most everything, it seems to help. I also use the opportunity to give my subs and overnight soak when I drench the casing. For the most part, I use 56g COIR and enough water to make breaking up easier (1/2C-ish). After breaking up the COIR, I add 1C vermiculite and 1/4C playground sand. Mix it all together, toss in pan, cover in foil and bake 225F for 60min.
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#6 BirdsArentReal

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Posted 31 March 2022 - 10:17 AM

 

I dont have an answer to your question, rather a question of my own.. Since you mentioned it, why do you use a casing layer? I thought the general consensus for cubes was that a casing layer was unnecessary. Does this not apply to PE? I'll admit, I've almost exclusively grown B+ or very similar strains.

The general consensus seems to be that cubes don’t need a casing, but that they tend to do better with one. My experience matches that, I’ve grown with and without a casing and have had poor results without. It probably also depends greatly on maintaining ideal fruiting conditions, i.e. whether you’re fruiting in a tub, bag, martha, etc

I’ve never tried growing PE w/out a casing, but have read numerous comments over the years that they will only fruit with a casing.

 

Could you speak more on what a casing layer should be of? Someone commented on another post that they use soil as a casing. Another thing I've always assumed was that a casing was just an extra layer of whatever your substrate was on top. Havent thought about it being different materials.



#7 DonShadow

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Posted 31 March 2022 - 06:00 PM

A casing, as as I understand it, is a low-nutrient material, usually peat moss, vermiculite, coir, perlite, sand, or various mixtures of said materials. The materials are usually lightweight and readily hold/wick moisture without shrinking or compressing. The result of using a casing will be very similar to the effect of humus or detritus composed of fallen leaves, twigs etc. on the forest floor where fungi thrives and fruits. The low-nutrient quality acts as a contamination barrier while also holding in moisture, regulating the rate of evaporation and creating micro-climates at the surface of the ground where mushrooms will grow.

If you’ve ever grown mushrooms outdoors or if you observe their natural growth habits, you’ll notice that they often prefer to grow in tufts of grass or under leaves, at the base of rocks, stumps, garden gnomes etc. This is because the humidity and temperature will be slightly higher in said areas where there is a little less airflow and a bit of insulation. The bark of a tree will also serve a similar function—bark is far less nutritious than the core wood of a tree so it shields fungi from competitors, holds in moisture and encourages fruiting.

As far as actual casing recipes go… there are a million of them. A simple 50/50 peat moss/course vermiculite mix with a PH buffer like crushed oyster shells and/or calcium carbonate works great.
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#8 BirdsArentReal

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Posted 01 April 2022 - 08:40 AM

A casing, as as I understand it, is a low-nutrient material, usually peat moss, vermiculite, coir, perlite, sand, or various mixtures of said materials. The materials are usually lightweight and readily hold/wick moisture without shrinking or compressing. The result of using a casing will be very similar to the effect of humus or detritus composed of fallen leaves, twigs etc. on the forest floor where fungi thrives and fruits. The low-nutrient quality acts as a contamination barrier while also holding in moisture, regulating the rate of evaporation and creating micro-climates at the surface of the ground where mushrooms will grow.

If you’ve ever grown mushrooms outdoors or if you observe their natural growth habits, you’ll notice that they often prefer to grow in tufts of grass or under leaves, at the base of rocks, stumps, garden gnomes etc. This is because the humidity and temperature will be slightly higher in said areas where there is a little less airflow and a bit of insulation. The bark of a tree will also serve a similar function—bark is far less nutritious than the core wood of a tree so it shields fungi from competitors, holds in moisture and encourages fruiting.

As far as actual casing recipes go… there are a million of them. A simple 50/50 peat moss/course vermiculite mix with a PH buffer like crushed oyster shells and/or calcium carbonate works great.

ah okay, thanks DonShadow. You were actually the person who referred to it as soil which confused me. When I hear that I think of garden soil LOL I guess it's probably just a generic term though.

 

I guess I basically understand what it is and what its used for. I think I just freaked out for a min because I haven't used or looked into casing layers in years. Then I hear we're using garden soil now these days!?!?! HAHAHAHH I thought I wasnt hip with the latest casing jazz, gotta keep up with the times.


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