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Psilocybe cyanescens in grass


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#1 waylitjim

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 03:01 PM

Psilocybe cyanescens from the Puget Sound region ~ All credit goes to Blek

Found in the heart of Suburbia in a patch I found last year. All of the cyans were found along this edgeline. It has a perfect moist, shady microclimate with moderately long grass for the cyans to grow up through. New suburban housing developments are usually built on a freshly devastated/clearcut area, which is the type of environment where cyans flourish. The grass that composes these suburban lawns comes in on trucks from a nearby turf farm. Something in a fertilizer they use causes the mushrooms to flourish in these lawns. Last year a certain neighborhood was producing pounds of Panaleous Subbalteatus throughout the summer and pounds of Psilocybe Cyanescens in the fall from the same lawn(s)


http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1161633220

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1161633220

http://mycotopia.net...50&d=1161633256

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1161633220

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1161633220

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1161633220

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#2 dial8

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 03:06 PM

Very cool...loving those pics! So what is in the fertilizer? Do you know?

#3 waylitjim

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 03:15 PM

No idea, it's probably like Scotts Turf Builder or something similar.

I've seen pics of cyans in grass before, but the grass was planted on top of woodchips.
It's pretty cool if these are fruiting without wood.

#4 psilocibec

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 03:28 PM

It's pretty cool if these are fruiting without wood.


Why dont you try to isolate it and test it on a substrate without wood in its composition?

It would be nice to find a genetic cousin that can fruit well without the wood.

Very nice pics brow ! :rasta:

#5 yerbaadam

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 03:34 PM

What a finD!!!

Was the soil examined to check out the below ground mycelium?

What a freaking find!

#6 Foster

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 03:53 PM

WoW! beautiful pics! is it that unusual to find these fruiting in such locations naturally? the size of the coverage is awesome. I've never found any fruiting in the wild, but that would be the kind of patch you wanna find for sure! nice work blek and WLJ.

#7 Hippie3

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 04:33 PM

i'd bet there's a bed of wood mulch under there somewhere...
lots of soil mixes these days incorporate "forest byproducts"

pix are
bonito
:bow:

#8 golly

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 04:35 PM

In those Sod farms they usually till in a layer of compost b4 seeding ..
The compost is often made with cheap wood waste products among other things..This could be the food source for psilly Cyans...
I wish i had a lawn like that...Nice...

#9 BuckarooBanzai

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 05:22 PM

Thanks for posting those, dude!

Beautiful pictures. I love the closing line of his post...

#10 shadyfigure

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 05:46 PM

woah, nice pics, nice find! thanks for the info

#11 python

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 05:49 PM

yes, bonito is the word.....thx jim

#12 Guest_cap_*

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 06:13 PM

I love the closing line of his post...

me three
awesome stuph! thanks for showing it to us waylit. his pics made me hungry! :eusa_droo

#13 the jesus

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 06:27 PM

In my area when a large development is being built, the trees that aren't worth anything are chipped and added to the fill to save money. This fill is used in the yards of the houses since it is not suitable for under the roads. Normally there is a good layer of topsoil between the fill and the sod but it is possible that these areas were either raked too thin or less topsoil was used so the chips are closer to the surface. Just a thought.

#14 the_chosen_one

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 06:32 PM

Lol, I was just getting some funny looks today as I was wandering through an industrial area at lunch.

#15 Hippie3

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 06:36 PM

you get funny looks just about everywhere you go don't you ?

#16 the_chosen_one

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 06:49 PM

:D true.

#17 Disruptor

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 07:09 PM

Cyans look amazing!! If there was a mushroom beauty pageant, Psilocybe cyanescens would win hands down.

#18 bluehelix

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 07:58 PM

Huh, I thought these were ugly. Different strokes for different folks I guess. What's with the black rot on them? Is that normal?

#19 waylitjim

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 08:04 PM

I too find woodlovers very beautiful. The black spots are very common on cyanescens as they mature. It's a bacterial infection which often takes place as they ripen. It'll eventually consume the entire cap, they'll rot and return to the earth.

If you eat Ps cyans fresh, it's best to avoid ones which have bacterial blot.

Here's another example.

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1161652026

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#20 llamabox

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 08:05 PM

Stamets gave a lecture in 99 in Amsterdam where he discribes this.

In the PNW because of logging in the past there are massive mount of woodchips under the top foot of topsoil in areas that were forests and are now housing sub-divisions.




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