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JaRs' Pretty Fly Strip clone / agar substitute


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#181 deucedbi9

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 06:18 AM

hmm, this does not seem to panning out as claimed.

but...how many of these attempts to recreate jars findings have used the same brand of fly strip,and conditions ie in a fc(humid) that jar had. may be some trade-secret/family recipe addition to a "bog- standard" fly strip recipe ,that enabled the growth. or the fly itself...
hip "...regurgitate stomach contents as flies do and a few stray bits get left behind to grow out."
...a fly lands on fly strip, get stuck,no? he regurgitates his/your myc all over his "lill feet" lol, and becomes myc food as it grows out.more nutricious than tape i'd say! sweet justice lol.so....
catch one of the lill blighters thats been munching your myc,a small squeezy bottle, perhaps with a tube in the cap,squeeze the bottle to create a little vacuum when released,suck the bleeder up and blow out onto the fly paper.
appropriately bizzare idea came to me as i type.lol
if the above vacuum bottle/fly catcher is filled with sterile air,like you would to make a shakable spore syringe,suck up the pest and blow him out into a peroxidated honey water jar.
i'm talking a, fruit/mushroom- fly/gnat, born and bred in your sterlile-ish fc,not a blue-bottle thats just flown in from the garden after snacking on your dogs dooda.
the peroxide(hopefully)kills any bacteria leaving your myc to digest, a nice, warming honeyed-fly broth. yum. fruit fly lc tek. anyone. lol
invitro:"...packing tape was all but destroyed when trying to get the tape apart." maybe you could just wipe tape with h20 or etc, cut a nice segment showing growth from the tape and place in an lc or prepared grain jar?

#182 TVCasualty

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 09:02 AM

:lol:


I think when we're trying to use flies to replace scalpels and fly strips to replace agar that we've strayed a bit far into la-la land. At some point there's the danger of becoming so fixated on making this hypothesis work that the procedure becomes many times more complicated than the existing methods. This will have to wait, I think, until people have developed genetic modification further (or taught sterile culture to Jeff Goldblum). Then we could GM a fly that always regurgitates mycelium, wherever it lands (Jeff could inoc a lot of substrate)! Or nano-scalpels that use microscopic machines to individually fight off contaminants, one by one (helpful to clean up an isolate)...

On the other hand, it seems plausible that some mycelial colonies might in fact get distributed by flies (hopping from cow chip to cow chip for exammple) in nature. Gnats have been implicated in cross-contaminating petri plates in labs, so there might be a very "tech" tek in there somewhere. This is looking like one of those ideas someone could pursue for years and either end up getting rich and famous or end up broke and single and living in an apartment with aquariums full of flies.

#183 Hippie3

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 09:48 AM

:lol:
werd

#184 Lazlo

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 10:08 AM

agreed
apparently the flies eat mycellia
then land on the strips,
regurgitate their stomach contents as flies do
and a few stray bits get left behind to grow out.


This makes sense, as I haven't gotten squat for germination on my strip.

#185 dial8

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 11:06 AM

Agreed. My left eyebrow began to raise several posts back.

hmm, this does not seem to panning out as claimed.



#186 Hippie3

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Posted 11 December 2006 - 11:21 AM

I think when we're trying to use flies to replace scalpels and fly strips to replace agar that we've strayed a bit far into la-la land. At some point there's the danger of becoming so fixated on making this hypothesis work that the procedure becomes many times more complicated than the existing methods


agreed.
easier, not harder,
is what we seek.

#187 moldylogic

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 09:47 AM

Well, im going to bump this old thread.

I found some info pertaining to it.
Department of Hand Surgery, University Hospital of Umea, Sweden.
The antibacterial effects of rosins and resin acids were studied in vitro using three methods, disc diffusion on agar, agar dilution, and broth dilution. Rosin and some resin acids had antibacterial effects that were restricted to Gram-positive bacteria. The abietic type of acids had a more pronounced antibacterial activity than the pimaric and labdane acids when the disc diffusion method was used but there was no inhibition of growth of Gram-negative bacteria. Among the individual resin acids, dehydroabietic acid was generally the most potent, when disc diffusion on agar was used, and prediffusion increased the inhibitory effect. The composition of the pure resin acids dehydroabietic, neoabietic, and isopimaric acid did not change during the experiment, but abietic and levopimaric acid were converted into dehydroabietic acid by the addition of Muller-Hinton agar. In conclusion the old tradition of treating wounds with pitch, sap, rosin, or rosin containing tapes might therefore have some antibacterial relevance.
PMID: 2281306 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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I did not quite understand all of this but I left it up to be complete.
And this...
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The germicidal activity of rosin soap and fatty acid-rosin soap as indicated by hand-washing experiments

W. D. Pohle1 and L. S. Stuart2, 3
(1) Naval Stores, Research Division, USA
(2) Eastern Regional Research Laboratory, USA
(3) Bureau of Agricultural Chemistry and Engineering, U. S. Department of Agriculture, USA

Summary and Conclusions Price’s procedure as slightly modified (4) was used for studying the germicidal action of cleaning agents on the hands and showed that rosin soap and a commercial soap containing rosin were more active germicidally on the bacteria normally found on human skin than the usual commercial fatty acid soaps free from rosin soap.
The experiments indicate that the lather of a 10-percent coconut oil soap solution and of a 10-percent coconut oil-rosin soap solution are germicidally active against the organisms removed. However, three 2-minute washes with these soap solutions had little effect on the bacteria not removed from the hands. The use of a 10-percent rosin soap solution in the same manner had a marked germicidal effect against both the organisms removed and those remaining.
The lather of a commercial soap containing rosin soap was shown to be germicidally active, but three 2-minute washes had only a slight effect on the resident flora. However, the regular use of this soap daily for one week led to substantial reduction of both the transient and resident flora of the hands.
The evidence of germicidal activity of rosin soaps and soaps containing rosin, both with regard to these hand-washing experiments and the “in vitro” (7) experiments, indicates that wider consideration might well be given this type of soap where germicidal activity is of importance.
L. S. Stuart was employed in the Industrial-Farm Products Research Division when this work was done.

#188 Travesty

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 10:39 PM

I'll try some gaph or gaff tape. (sp?)

sweet info!




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