Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

JaRs' Fly Strip clone / agar substitute


  • Please log in to reply
49 replies to this topic

#1 JaR

JaR

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 96 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 10:14 AM

I first noticed that a flystrip can colonize when i put one in a tub full of contam and flies (I hate flies).
The flies landed on the flystrip and they must of had spores on there lil feet cause It grew myc everywhere the flies landed with no signs of contam.
That gave me the idea to try out some tissue from the inside of a boomer.
It worked!! The myc grew
So i tried some dried tissue from a dry boomer.
It worked!! The myc grew
So the ultimate test was to use some tissue from the inside of a boomer grow it out and make a nice clone water LC.
This pic was posted in order to show a friend it indeed does work.
http://mycotopia.net...71&d=1161089608


So heres how I do it.
Get a flystrip . (I like the "white" kind of flystrip) Im using a brown one for a better photo.
Cut a 2x2 square of flystrip and Toss on whatever you want to clone.
I put the flystrip on a piece of cardboard held down by a tack.
Put flystrip with clone "whatever" in a zip lock or a container with lid. I spray the lid/bag like when taking a print
Put into incubator at 82*
Couple days later you have your clone sample.
The flystrip is very sticky so to get the myc off the strip I use a scapel with some water sprayed on it .
Put clone tissue in lc and there you go.
As far as contams go I havent seen any On the flystrip ever.
Most of the time the myc will grow on the underside of the flystrip.
In the pic above of the fruit i actually tried to get contams by taking tissue out by unwashed hands and in the open. I even dropped it on the floor before putting on the flystrip Nothing but Myc grew.

Attached Thumbnails

  • flystripclonetoshare22222222222.jpg
  • flystripclonetoshare333333333.jpg
  • flystripclonetoshare1111111.jpg


#2 JaR

JaR

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 96 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 10:19 AM

I had some nice pics of the whole process but the ol lady erased them on accident.
Im unsure if this is easier than agar work having never found agar.
This was done on SA strain cubensis

#3 dial8

dial8

    3 Fungi Mod

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 5,740 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 07 November 2006 - 10:27 AM

Wow, that is something else! Pretty neat! No contams at all, huh? Can you post what kind of strip you are using and it's active constituents and even the inactives? I'm curious as to why the myc will grow but other contams will not.

#4 StroFun

StroFun

    Master Baiter

  • Expired Member
  • 501 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 10:28 AM

Pretty sweet thanks for sharing. Have you tried fruiting from a strip?

#5 dial8

dial8

    3 Fungi Mod

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 5,740 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 07 November 2006 - 10:28 AM

This works for you on a regular basis? How many times have you done this?

#6 JaR

JaR

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 96 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 10:33 AM

This works for you on a regular basis? How many times have you done this?


Ive been using this method for around 5 months now with no problems thats not to say it cant contam just ive yet to come across one using this

Active ingredients are
Rosin 62%
tack-paper tape 38%

Ill post a pic of the strips I use in a while when camera comes back.

Pretty sweet thanks for sharing. Have you tried fruiting from a strip?


Nope yet to try I dont think it would fruit tho.

#7 Guest_vinz_*

Guest_vinz_*
  • Guest

Posted 07 November 2006 - 10:33 AM

haha thats really something..
whats the reddish stuff around the myc?

really cool how people come up with new and better stuff to improve the study on shrooms!

how did you even come up with that idea? haha

#8 JaR

JaR

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 96 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 10:38 AM

The brand of the "white flystrips I like are Catchmaster scented bug and fly catcher The "white" strips do a lil better than the brown ones (the myc grows faster) there are no listings of ingredients on the white flystrip packaging

whats the reddish stuff around the myc?


Thats the fly strip sticky shit. LOL

#9 JaR

JaR

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 96 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 11:03 AM

this is the brand The white one is on the left the brown to the right. I prefer the "white" ones

Attached Thumbnails

  • brandoflystripiusetoclone001.jpg


#10 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 11:09 AM

interesting, i've used those for flies and gnats but never thought to grow on one.
:bow:

#11 Guest_vinz_*

Guest_vinz_*
  • Guest

Posted 07 November 2006 - 11:09 AM


Thats the fly strip sticky shit. LOL


LOL they gathered up around the myc? or did the myc push it away from where it originally was?

#12 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 11:11 AM

http://mycotopia.net...39&d=1162912336

pic of the month nominee

#13 JaR

JaR

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 96 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 11:16 AM

pic of the month nominee


That has to be the blurriest Pic of the month nominee ever! LOL
I am HONORED

LOL they gathered up around the myc? or did the myc push it away from where it originally was?


The myc grew into/onto the flystrip the red stuff is actually brown but this camera really sux.
Thank You for the title change

#14 SharkieJones

SharkieJones

    Moderator

  • OG VIP
  • 3,269 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 11:30 AM

This is very interesting. What excatly is Rosin? This would be something I would like to try. Nice work mad scientist.:)

#15 JaR

JaR

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 96 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 11:37 AM

This is very interesting. What excatly is Rosin? This would be something I would like to try. Nice work mad scientist


A look on wikepedia gives this

Rosin, formerly called colophony or Greek pitch (Pix græca), is a solid form of resin obtained from pines and some other plants, mostly conifers, produced by heating fresh liquid resin to vaporise the volatile liquid terpene components. It is semi-transparent and varies in color from yellow to black. At room temperature it is brittle, but it melts at stove-top temperatures. It chiefly consists of different resin acids, especially abietic acid

Uses

Rosin is an ingredient in printing inks, varnishes, adhesives (glues), medicines, chewing gum, soap, paper sizing, and, in past times, sealing wax.
In industry it is the precursor to the flux used in soldering. The tin-lead solder commonly used in electronics has about 1% rosin as a flux core helping the molten metal flow and making a better connection. It's frequently seen as the burnt or clear residue around new soldering.
It is also extensively used for its friction-increasing capacity. Such uses include rosining the bows of stringed instruments such as violins or cellos to produce sound. For this purpose, extra substances such as gold and silver are sometimes added to the rosin for extra friction and/or highly-disputed "tone improvements". Ballet dancers sometimes rub their shoes in powdered rosin to reduce slipping before going on stage. Bull riders rub rosin on their rope and glove for additional grip. Baseball pitchers and ten-pin bowlers may have a small bag of powdererd rosin nearby, to use on their throwing hand, for better control of the ball.
A mixture of pitch and rosin is used to make a surface against which glass is polished when making optical components such as lenses.
In pharmaceuticals, it forms an ingredient in several plasters and ointments.
It is also added in small quantities to traditional linseed oil/sand gap fillers, used in building work

Production
Rosin is also known as colophony or colophonia resina from its origin in Colophon, an ancient Ionic city. It is the resinous constituent of the oleo-resin exuded by various species of pine, known in commerce as crude turpentine. The separation of the oleo-resin into the essential oil-spirit of turpentine and common rosin is effected by distillation in large copper stills. The essential oil is carried off at a temperature of between 100° and 160° C, leaving fluid rosin, which is run off through a tap at the bottom of the still, and purified by passing through straining wadding. Rosin varies in color, according to the age of the tree from whence the turpentine is drawn and the amount of heat applied in distillation, from an opaque almost pitchy black substance through grades of brown and yellow to an almost perfectly transparent colorless glassy mass. The commercial grades are numerous, ranging by letters from A, the darkest, to N, extra pale, superior to which are W, window glass, and WW, water white varieties, the latter having about three times the value of the common qualities.
On a large scale, it is treated by destructive distillation for the production of rosin spirit, pinoline and rosin oil. The last enters into the composition of some of the solid lubricating greases, and is also used as an adulterant of other oils.
Though types of rosin may vary, there is no difference in quality. The types of rosin used in the playing of string instruments depends entirely on the preference of the player. The price varies according to how hard it is to procure the particular type.

Properties

Rosin is a brittle and friable, with a faint piny odor; the melting-point varies with different specimens, some being semi-fluid at the temperature of boiling water, while others melt at 100°C to 120°C. It is very flammable, burning with a smoky flame, so care should be taken when melting it. It is soluble in alcohol, ether, benzene and chloroform. Rosin consists mainly of abietic acid, and combines with caustic alkalis to form salts (rosinates or pinates) that are known as rosin soaps. In addition to its extensive use in soap making, rosin is largely employed in making inferior varnishes, sealing-wax and various adhesives. It is also used for preparing shoemakers' wax, as a flux for soldering metals, for pitching lager beer casks, for rosining the bows of musical instruments and numerous minor purposes.
Prolonged exposure to rosin fumes released during soldering can cause occupational asthma (formerly called colophony disease <SUP class=reference id=_ref-0>[1]</SUP> in this context) in sensitive individuals, although it is not known which component of the fumes causes the problem. <SUP class=reference id=_ref-1>[2]</SUP>

sources

The chief region of rosin production is southern China, such as Guangdong, Guangxi, Fujian, Yunnan and Jiangxi, and Northern part of Vietnam. Chinese rosin is obtained mainly from the turpentine of Masson's Pine Pinus massoniana and Slash Pine P. elliottii.
The South Atlantic and Eastern Gulf states of the United States is also the chief region of production. American rosin is obtained from the turpentine of Longleaf Pine Pinus palustris and Loblolly Pine P. taeda. In Mexico, most of the rosin is derived from live tapping (gum rosin) of several species of pine trees, but mostly P. oocarpa, P. leiophylla, P. michoacana and P. montezumae. Most production is concentrated in the west-central state of Michoacán.
The main source of supply in Europe is the French district of Les Landes in the departments of Gironde and Landes, where the Maritime Pine P. pinaster is extensively cultivated. In the north of Europe rosin is obtained from the Scots Pine P. sylvestris, and throughout European countries local supplies are obtained from other species of pine, with Aleppo Pine P. halepensis being particularly important in the Mediterranean region.

#16 dial8

dial8

    3 Fungi Mod

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 5,740 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 07 November 2006 - 11:54 AM

Archive material > cloning

#17 buzzmurdoc

buzzmurdoc

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 14 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 12:37 PM

have you tried germinating spores on flypaper ?

#18 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 12:41 PM

have you tried germinating spores on flypaper ?



umm, the first two lines of the thread-

I first noticed that a flystrip can colonize when i put one in a tub full of contam and flies (I hate flies).
The flies landed on the flystrip and they must of had spores on there lil feet cause It grew myc everywhere the flies landed with no signs of contam.



#19 SharkieJones

SharkieJones

    Moderator

  • OG VIP
  • 3,269 posts

Posted 07 November 2006 - 07:21 PM

This may be a nice substitute for agar. I'm going to try using this from spores. How are you storing the specimen?

#20 the_chosen_one

the_chosen_one

    electro gypsy

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 8,113 posts

Donator

Posted 07 November 2006 - 07:44 PM

has the myc begun to sector at all?

I noticed that rosin is soluble in alcohol. might be a nice way to fill a petri dish. a cold pour similar to agar then let the alcohol evaporate. :eusa_thin

great discovery!!! :thumbup:




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!