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Wagner Wallpaper Steamer/Cooler Pasteurizer


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#41 PsychoactiveMessiah

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 08:04 AM

Ive seen a few before, like the vicks vaporizer for doing compost..neat stuff..let us know how it goes...

#42 Dank Side Of The Shroom

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 09:14 AM

nice tek man. yeah how much is that. i need to build me one of those.

#43 altered_states

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 03:57 PM

Here's Hippie's link for the Wagner:

http://www.overstock...E&PROD_ID=12439

That's the best price I've seen, $34US factory reconditioned.

I paid $50 for mine at Lowe's and it's the exact same model, the 705 Power Steamer.

The cooler was $35.
I bought it during the summer, and it turned out to be such a great cooler that I kept using it, delaying my project. The Wagner's been NIB since the summer, too, sitting on the bottom of my closet.

The steamer's intended purpose is wallpaper removal. (there are much better ways to remove wallpaper... enymes that eat glue, Etc.)

I already had the hardware cloth and white racks. (and some other miscellaneous stuff) I either forgot or never knew their prices, but...

Total cost is about $100...

About the same cost as a propane burner and a big-ass stockpot or metal drum. The steamer setup is much easier to acquire and to use. It's probably much, much more safe, too, considering that I no don't need to lift a 200 pound barrell off a 90,000BTU rocket motor.

The process I just mentioned can NOT be accompolished in the living room; that requires, first and foremost, that you be OUTDOORS... Not good when you have neighbors or Winter. (LPG is NOT a good thing to to burn in your house for many, many reasons. Take a cue from the stove, only natural gas indoors) Steamer's still orders of magnitude easier.

The steamer setup doesn't require a trip to a brew supply store, or any specialty store for that matter.

Not having to work with 10, 20, or 30+ Gallons of 170F shit-bleach-lime-water...
Priceless.

More pics coming later today.

Peace,
AS

#44 red_lenses

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 08:55 PM

VERY cool!
Keep us posted, I just might know somebody that could REALLY use one of those.

Red

#45 altered_states

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 08:57 AM

Sorry about the delay...

Here's what it looked like when I opened it up.
Moisture content was WAY too low.
At least water is easier to add than it is to subtract.
The materials were only moist enough to control dust while mixing.

The cooled, pasteurized substrate was sprayed with ordinary tap water from a bottle that previously contained 10% bleach solution.
I dumped out the bleach solution and filled from the tap, no rinsing.

The tray is 13"x9", and it has a twin.
Each was inoculated with 1 Qt. jar of multispore rye berries.
The spawn and sub were layered nice and evenly into the trays.

Plenty of crap remains in that cooler; it was barely dented.

Any suggestions on getting my moisture content correct would be great.
I didn't soak the substrate because this is my first steam trial.
I've read about steaming dry straw, and having it at perfect field capacity when cooled, so I was conservative.

I'll keep you posted.

Peace, AS

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#46 altered_states

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:17 AM

nice tek man. yeah how much is that. i need to build me one of those.


Thank you, thank you... :o
But this is by no means a TEK. (yet)
And it certainly isn't my TEK...

Hippie sent me this link a long time ago:

http://www.mycotopia...icle.php?21.255

Hippie seems to be a big fan of steam pasteurization.
I intend to find out exactly why this is the case.

Here's another thread on this topic that I found to be quite informative:

http://mycotopia.net...html?1078666159

Peace,
AS

#47 altered_states

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 02:23 PM

The two trays seem to be colonizing nicely.
They are colonizing unevenly, but like I said before, they're multispore. (PF Hawaiian Spores... I love Hawaiians)

The trays will be ready for casing in 2-3 more days; I haven't seen them since yesterday afternoon.

The pasteurizer had it's second run last night.
This time I hydrated the substrate to roughly field capacity before steaming the contents. I sprayed the contents with 10% bleach before hydrating with hot tap water.

I belive that I may have used a little too much water; the mix wasn't soaked by any stretch, but the temperature would not go above 150F for the duration of the run. (2 hrs after reaching 150F, this time) Hopefully it will be alright.

I'll have a much better idea what went on inside there after I open it today. I assume that, despite my efforts, the substrate became compacted, OR the mound that I built up so the thermometer's probe would be in the compost fell apart and I was measuring air temperature.

More pics later today or tomorrow.

Peace,
AS

#48 altered_states

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 02:57 AM

The substrate from the pasteurizer's second run was also surprisingly dry. I couldn't get a drop of water to squeeze out of it after it had cooled.
Because this form of pasteurization is new to me, I decided to spawn without adding any water, although the sub seemed dry.
I layered roughly 4'' of this substrate with 2 Qt's of rye spawn in the bottom of an 18 Gallon (I believe) Sterilite.
That was 5 days ago, and it's just beginning to poke through the surface in a few places. The picture below was taken immediately after spawning, but it really doesn't look any different today. The edges are pulling in nicely...
The tray, pictured above was cased today with microwaved vermiculite (moistened before nuking). The tray is now filled to the top with the addition of the casing layer.
No sights or smells of contamination in any of the projects.

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#49 bassplar99

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 08:53 AM

I hae that same cooler (it is a good cooler) and was planning on doing this in a week. Can you go into more detail about what you had to do to regulate your temp? I was worried about this and was thinking about putting a regulator in there with a thermocouple to kick the steamer on and off.

#50 reverend trips

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 09:22 AM

That is awesome AS.
So you mixed a cup of hydrated lime into your compost?
Wonder if you could add the lime right into the steamer and do it that way?
Thanks for giving me an excuse to go blow some money on another power tool:)

#51 Hippie3

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 09:27 AM

archive material

i gave one of those away in a raffle here last year,
cheap and effective.
nice write-up.
:bow:

#52 altered_states

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 04:15 PM

I hae that same cooler (it is a good cooler) and was planning on doing this in a week. Can you go into more detail about what you had to do to regulate your temp? I was worried about this and was thinking about putting a regulator in there with a thermocouple to kick the steamer on and off.

I honestly didn't do anything at all to regulate the temperature aside from drilling two 6mm holes in the lid.
After running it, I don't even believe that those holes were necessary for this specific setup; plenty of steam escapes at the part of the lid that serves as a handle for opening the cooler. The holes that I drilled through the lid tend to partially reseal themselves when the foam insulation gets hot. From what I've read, it is important to let the old steam escape and let the new steam circulate (live steam).
If you intend to pasteurize, not to compost, I would recommend trying it the easy way first.
I plan to make some modifications to this setup so it can also function as a composter.

Reverend, I have been wondering the same thing about lime... And, "You're welcome", for the new power tool.
The main reason I didn't put lime in the water is that lime leaves lime deposits. I didn't want to risk fouling up the heating element. (which happened anyway... very hard water)
Also, I simply didn't want to breathe in any more lime.
As all of us who have used the stuff know, breathing hydrated lime is a very unpleasant experience. I ran this in my apartment-dwelling friend's living room. (while playing Xbox) The lime that I mixed with the substrate was definitely in the air after roughly an hour at full-steam, but it was no worse than being in the kitchen while pasteurizing with lime on the stovetop.
The strongest odor was that of the straw, which held everything together... A small price to pay.

The steam pasteurizer has won me over.
It is much easier, much less messy and much more safe to use than hot water.
The steamer's tank is even the perfect size for a two-hour run.

Hippie, thank you for the 'chives, and thank you for turning me on to this method; I wish that I would have started using it sooner!
"Cheap and effective" is an understatement, IMHO.

Thank you for the kind words, everyone!
Peace,
AS

#53 bassplar99

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 05:27 PM

It may be worthwhile to add a little vinegar to the steamer when in use to reduce lime deposits??

#54 Hippie3

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 07:05 PM

also see
http://mycotopia.net...ad.php?p=218390

#55 altered_states

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 09:40 AM

It may be worthwhile to add a little vinegar to the steamer when in use to reduce lime deposits??

That should work just as well as it does for a coffee pot...
But not while pasteurizing or making coffee!
That will steam the lime right out of the substrate and/or make some terrible coffee.
It's definitely a good idea between runs.
I ran the contraption twice, the second time with some deposits caked to the heating element.
Although there were other variables involved, the temperature didn't get above 150F during the second run.

I checked the big tub yesterday (Day 7) and it was at 75% surface colonization.
Day 5 showed only a few whisps of white, not even 1%.
If it continued to grow at this rate, it's ready for casing now. :D

Maybe the substrate wasn't too dry... :eusa_sile
I'll try not to forget the camera today.

#56 bassplar99

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 11:01 PM

I currently tried the SAME setup, identical cooler and all. I did not drill a hole in the top for venting but did poke a small themrometer through. I also inserted a meat thermometer into the hay. Basically the unit got too hot too fast, temps skyrocketed to almost 180 and I unplugged the unit for a while. I am going to install this:
http://www.zymico.com/controls/
This will allow me to control the temp without being there the whole time.

#57 altered_states

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 10:57 PM

I just checked on 4 tubs of composted horse manure that were spawned 4 days ago.
They all have cobweb on the surface of the substrate.

Would over-pasteurization explain this?
I found out, after pasteurizing, that my meat thermometer is broken.
The substrate was steamed with a Wagner for 2 hours, the thermometer reading 130F for the duration of the run.
The boil test showed that it doesn't read higher than 130F anymore, but I spawned anyway, not knowing how hot things really got inside the cooler... I now assume too hot.

Is cobweb common in bulk subs that got too hot?
TMC says spores are killed after exposure to 115-122F for 1/2 hour.
It was definitely way over 122F.

I've never even heard of anybody getting cobweb on their substrate... Always casings (and TMC mentions fruitbodies)

Should I just toss them? H2O2?

Thanks in advance everyone,
AS

#58 SharkieJones

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 11:36 PM

Are you saying that you knocked up the sub while it was still hot on the inside? Also how long did you wait before you noticed the cobweb?

#59 altered_states

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 01:16 AM

I allowed it to cool for over 24 hours; the manure was below 80F at spawning (different thermometer).

I looked at the tubs for the first time today, 4 days after spawning.

#60 bluehelix

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 01:35 AM

The only times I have had trouble with cobweb is when the ambient temperature was too high. Keep in mind that you don't want your ambient much over 78F during this phase as the difference between the core and ambient can easily reach 10F or more.




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