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Buddhism makes more sense than Christianity


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#1 dr_gonz

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 10:20 AM

Just because Christianity is what most of us were taught doesn't exactly make it truth.

I really think buddhism has much more to offer. Anyone else practice buddhism?

#2 suckerfree

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 11:07 AM

I like how when the Dali Lama comes to my area to speak, he rejects any form of payment.

I also like how they treat science, if you can prove to them in a scientific way something that doesn't quite agree with their 'religious knowledge", they will change their religious doctrines to fit with science.

#3 Doctor D

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 01:46 PM

Just because Christianity is what most of us were taught doesn't exactly make it truth.

I really think buddhism has much more to offer. Anyone else practice buddhism?


Yes, but it doesn't have to be "either, or". In fact, I think one of the reasons there are fewer Buddhists in America than there could be is because of this misconception that if you are a Christian, you cannot possibly be a Buddhist, too. I was talking about my practice to a friend of mine, and he said "Oh, I don't think that would go over well at my church". Ignorance of Buddhism leads people to believe it has some mystical teachings that are somehow contradictory to Christian teachings. In my opinion, however, Buddhism complements Christianity very well (although I myself am not a Christian).

You can be both a Christian and a Buddhist. Shunryu Suzuki said that for a Christian to be a good Buddhist, he first had to be a good Christian. Like that. You know?

#4 TwistedNinja

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 02:07 PM

I have so much more respect for buddhism. I feel at peace when reading books on buddhism. I think most christians are hippocrites and hide behind thier religion for thier wrong doings. I think if the world had a mindset of a buddist then the whole world would be better off. Christians like to denounce any religion that is not thier own and what they believe. Look at the differences in denominations and between those they fight. I just think most christians have it all wrong and buddhism is enlightenment.....
I don't claim to be buddhist but I love reading about it and actually have been considering becoming a buddhist...

#5 Xerces

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 03:17 PM

All I have to say is that what people think 'christians' are, are actually NOT christians.

#6 chimp

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 04:28 PM

All I have to say is that what people think 'christians' are, are actually NOT christians.


I am not a Christian, but I do agree with you Xerces. The problem is that those people that you speak of actually profess to be Christians.

#7 Vapor

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 05:21 PM

I was born Jewish. I have been a Zen Buddhist most of my life and I have vastly benifitted from both Hinduism and Taoism. I fervently believe in Jesus Christ but not in the teachings of organized religion, Judaism included, except for the threads of humanity, morality, and relative "high truths" that they all share to one extent or the other. I have difficulty accepting anyones dogma or having my consciousness limited by the definitions of others. Buddhism allows for direct and experiential spirituality without having to rely on middleman crutches like rabbies, priests,ministers, or any other intermediaries. They are made out of cosmic dust just like me. Why should they be a greater authority on being dust than I am.
There is a buddhist clergy the tradition of which I do respect for the most part. What they do and how they do it varies from sect to sect.They are the conduit for a type of knowledge and discipline that should be preserved and passed on. I have benifitted from their varied approaches but most of all from the Mahayanna school of thought/non thought that focuses on immediate enlightenment without regard for innumerable reincarnations to achieve the same. A "finger pointing the way" might at times be a great asset as long as it does not become institutionalized, and dogma. One thing that I love about real Zen is that it self destructs once realization is achieved. The last thing people need is another enduring "ism" to hold the consciousness of the human race in more bondage than it is already deeply imersed in. That's why people fight "holy wars" and slaughter each other over dumb shit. The job of Buddahism is to set us free. Just as Dr. Suzuki would have no trouble being comfortable in a mosque or church, Christ would be equally comfortable in a Buddhist or Hindu Temple or in a Shinto Shrine. Why? Because their minds are free. They are in "a house of God" where ever they are...even in the men's room.
God(whatever that is) is everywhere. So is the enlightened mind. Buddhism doesn't even require a belief in God to get you where you need to go. It is anti slavery. It wants to set you free. How can I be a born Jew, an almost life long practicing Zen Buddhist, recognize the essential messages of Hinduism and Taoism, and , adore Jesus Christ, believe in God ( which is not required by my belief systems) all at the same time? No problem...no contradiction!
I am no longer trapped in conceptual, dualistic reality although I find it helpful, invaluable, and fruitful of my material existence and well being to be adeptly involved with it. However, it has become part of my reality and my rational, logical, one and one makes two empiracle mind ( which is a cool thing) has become a part of my mind although I used to worship it as the mind itself. It is now like a really fine tool where as in the past i thought that it was the entire tool box.
Jack is out of the box so to speak. Way out!

"Om Tat Sat Nadme Padme Om"

#8 Guest_DaGoon_*

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 06:23 PM

nice write up vapor! im gonna have to read more into buddhism

#9 Guest_Transition Force_*

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 08:29 PM

Just because Christianity is what most of us were taught doesn't exactly make it truth.


Well duh. But one could equally switch Christianity with Buddhism and say the same thing to people living in primarily Buddhist areas.

Just because a lot of Christians are idiots doesn't mean they are the only religion with idiots. People have misused Buddhism just as they have misused Christianity.

#10 aumbrellaforainydays

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 10:00 PM

They are made out of cosmic dust just like me. Why should they be a greater authority on being dust than I am.


word... speaking of this religion, how many wars, crusades, inquisitions have buddhists partook during it's 2500 year history?

well proclaimed buddhist nations and kings probably have waged wars but it was the Buddha who said,

"Victory creates hatred. Defeat creates suffering. The wise ones desire neither victory nor defeat... Anger creates anger... He who kills will be killed. He who wins will be defeated... Revenge can only be overcome by abandoning revenge... The wise seek neither victory nor defeat."

A modern example of war and a true buddhist country was Tibet in the 1950's. if Tibet had been like patriotic america, there wouldve been hell to pay if china had invaded. but unlike american pride, the dalai lama didnt encourage his people to rebel or take action against them, not because his mililtary was outnumbered and ill equipped to beat the chinese, but because he believed that the real loser was not the one who lost the war, but the one who cant see the true nature of things.

although, lets not forget the tradition of the Samurai and the Shaolin. both were extremely well trained fighters but unlike knights of the west their meditative practices were just as developed as their ability to use violence. however i like to believe that the way these warriors interpreted battle was to understand violence so that they were better disciplined to know when not use aggressive force and when to know when aggressive force was absolutely necessary.

#11 Vapor

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 11:45 PM

Thanks DaGoon!
My Jew Buddhist Christ lovin self(or perhaps the illusion of this self) is tired to the point of being on the balls of its ass at the moment. However, I will either post or pm you regarding readings in the near illusion of the future once "I" rest up. It will help you to bypass all of the bullshit and get right into the meat of the matter. Oh, fuck it! I can't help myself but to give you an initial reference right now.
Zen Flesh, Zen Bones by Paul Reps
It is small and at first doesn't look like much. It should be "just read" and not necessarily "understood." Then as your life proceeds it becomes more and more meaningful and it can be reviewed as needed. It is the real deal and will do a lot for planting and expanding the seed as will another Reps masterpiece,
[B]The Wisdom of Insecurity[/B]. Reading this book will change you.Reps is important in the transmission of chan(Zen) to the Western world. He was able to feel and intude then internalize the teachings of D.T. Suzuki and then to use his profoundly unique talents as a spritual entertainer to make the magic palatable to other inquisitive minds.Tripping balls!

These are for starters.

Nite all!
I

#12 Doctor D

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 12:34 AM

word... speaking of this religion, how many wars, crusades, inquisitions have buddhists partook during it's 2500 year history?


We need not look far at all. In the Shunryu Suzuki biography Crooked Cucumber, we learn of Japanese Zen's complicity in the nationalistic fervor that took Japan by storm in the early 20th Century, turning into World War II.

If you want to know more about the subject, look up the book Zen at War by Brian Victoria.

#13 Jetson

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 01:31 AM

One thing nice about Buddhism is that it does not limit your beliefs or religious practices by any means as long they aren't harmful. So you could easily be a Christian Buddhist. It's a very open-minded, open-ended religion--quite appealing in my opinion.
I've studied Buddhism but I don't practice it, but my ethical and spiritual beliefs are definitely similar to that of Buddhists.

#14 the jesus

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 01:46 AM

If Buddhism makes MORE sense than christianity then it must also make LESS sense. Or no sense at all... ahh zen.:rasta:

#15 Hippie3

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 03:39 AM

this thread itself shows
that buddhism/buddhists are just as bad-
the whole point here is to
bash christianity and christians-
how the fuck is that
enlightened ?

sad is what it is,
pious hypocrisy to claim some kind of superiority
for buddhism in a thread saying
how much better than christians
that buddhists are...

#16 Guest_Transition Force_*

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 04:08 AM

this thread itself shows
that buddhism/buddhists are just as bad-
the whole point here is to
bash christianity and christians-
how the fuck is that
enlightened ?

sad is what it is,
pious hypocrisy to claim some kind of superiority
for buddhism in a thread saying
how much better than christians
that buddhists are...


amen

#17 infinity

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 08:06 AM

Hippie, please disregard any comments made againts Christianity for the sake of Buddhism. When you become a Buddhist, you must take certain vows, and one of them is to not offend another religious practice that preaches love and compassion. If you do, than you are not a Buddhist in the true form.

There are different forms of Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The Tibetans, Kabbalist, Gnostics, and Sufis have ways to reach enlightenment whether its through prayer, meditation, mind altering plants or self mutilation. Intention can be just as powerful as language, as tone can be just as effective as content.

#18 Vapor

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 09:01 AM

Dr. Dee. That is a cool reference. The martial Bushido ethos ( related to Zen philosophy, Shintoism, ancestor respect/worship, and duty) also did a job on their heads. Given the same cultural backround the venerable General Yamaguchi ( who I believe we later assasinated ) strongly came out against a war with America. His advise, " Let the giant sleep." This true Samurai was ignored by his powerful jingoistic peers and the rest followed.
By the way, I have a crooked cucumber of my own.

#19 Hippie3

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 09:23 AM

the samurai are not to be admired-
they oppressed the people
serving as the armored boot of their feudal overlords' -
enforcing their oppression upon the people.
they are every bit as despicable
as any knight of the crusaders,
armed and armored thugs
living a life of privilege
while preying on the poor and the weak.

#20 Vapor

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 09:30 AM

The Buddhist way is not exclusive of Christianity. There are many "Christian Buddhists."
A case in point...if you want to see some very clean Buddhism follow the works of Father Thomas Merton. I think that he almost got excommunicated at one point over his thinking. This didn't slow him down a bit. As far as I know he was buddies with the Dali Lama who is another really cool consciousness who's works are very worthy within the tradition of the Mahayanna or " Upper Vehicle" school of immediate enlightenment.
A person can bring whatever their source beliefs are to Buddhism. Its doors are open. The Void is a big place and can accomodate anything to start with.
Most of the world religions are much stiffer in this respect. Their doors are relatively closed to other than their own, or closely resembling their own, thought systems. They are protecting their market share of followers by implementing, institutionalizing, and perpetuating various, relatively effective, forms of mind control. Insofar as this contributes to a moral consciousness and an upright life, it is good. Insofar as it enslaves human consciousness and supports inhumanity it is bad.

From the Mahayanna perspective one can realize a moral consciousness and a way to think good, be good, and actually do good outside of the confines of slavery and within the context of unlimited liberation.

Eugene Herigel was not a Buddhist before he encountered the experience that led him to author " Zen and the Art of Archery." Neither was the man, his name escapes me, who did the tremendous read, "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintainance." Even after their enlightening experiences they remained what they had come with but adjusted and enhanced through the illumination of their experience.
These are landmark books for anyone interested in living Buddhism and you don't need to know a damn thing about archery or cycles to benifit from them.




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