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Cultivating Oyster mushrooms on newspaper........


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#1 Lazlo

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 04:25 PM

Cultivating mushrooms of the Oyster variety is very simple using paper products like newspapers, paper bags, shredded cardboard, exc. You'll need to have a substrate for the spawning of the paper product like, colonized grain or a PF style cake.

First thing's first, the materials.

1- clean plastic grocery bag with no holes in it. If there's holes in it, simply double up the bags.

1- bottle of bleach

1- quart of spawning substrate. Either 1qt. of whole grain or PF style substrate

1- measuring cup

1- clean sink or clean bucket large enough to house 2.5 gallons of water.

1- sunday editions worth of newspaper

 

*** edit *** broken links left as is so they can be fixed
 

 

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Now simply add the newspaper or papers to a sink exc. of bleached hot tap water. The bleach to water ratio is 2.5 gallons of hot tap water to a 1/4cup of bleach. Allow the newspaper to hydrate for about an hour and then simply stir up the newspaper and hot water. Lightly break up the paper into large chunks so all of the paper can be cleaned up with the bleached water. Then simply allow the paper another hour of soak time and it's done. Or it's done when the water's cool enough to touch easily. Under 80 degrees for spawning.

 

 

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Now simply ring out chunks of the paper to where only a few drips of water come out of it. Then simply start loading up the grocery bag. You want about 3/4" of inch of paper per layer. Then add a coating of spawn on top of each layer until you've run out of spawn. The top and final layer should be newspaper.
 

 

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After the bag is loaded up, simply take the handles of the plastic grocery bag and tie them into a cross knot. Like you're tying your shoes, without the final knot. Don't worry with a filter, as CO2 escapes through the top of the bag where the handles cross.

 

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Then simply push down rather hard on the bag, getting the air out of it while compressing the substrate into a block. You don't have to stand on the bag, but you want the substrate to be nice and firm. The total substrate thickness should be 4" after being packed firmly.

 

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Then simply write the spawning date on top of the bag and give it 2 weeks or as long as takes for colonization. Let it get nice and thick with mushroom mycelium. Don't worry if some of the paper on the sides doesn't colonize. That will happen from the paper being pushed up against the bag hard. Not a problem and will colonize once the substrate's birthed.

Here's a picture of the substrate colonizing at 1 week.
 

 

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Substrate at 2 weeks and ready for birthing.
 

 

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Birthed substrate in the Oyster strains fruiting enviroment. Each individual species of Oyster has a different fruiting temperature for the most part. You'll need to know what temperature your species fruits at to have success. You'll want to maintain 90-95% RH for all of them though. This way the substrate and fruit bodies don't dry up on you.

Pleurotus primordia forming on the paper substrate block.

 

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Simple as that. I'll update the thread accordingly.

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Edited by hyphaenation, 25 August 2014 - 02:50 PM.

  • AmBe, kcmoxtractor, curenado and 1 other like this

#2 Lazlo

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 04:32 PM

Something else. Ignore the Lion's Mane spawn in the first photo. It's an experiment.

And don't concern yourself with the ink either. Newspaper ink is derived from soy beans, so it's perfectly fine. Although it does stain your hands a bit, but washes off easily with soap and water.

#3 reefer

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 04:50 PM

very nice work! :bow:

#4 golly

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 05:58 PM

Thas beautifull Laz...Love the simplicity...Would this work with the King oyster...?...Great pix too btw...

#5 Lazlo

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 06:36 PM

With King's it should work as well. The SUPPOSED isolate from the salt thread gobbled up paper bags rather well. It's nearly finished up and we'll see if it's indeed the King isolate.

#6 Lazlo

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 12:49 AM

By the way, this is an isolate of Pleurotus pulmonarius. She's a beauty and will eat your home if I spawned it.:evil: So don't mess with me. :)

#7 fucgubarn

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 01:25 AM

This is very nice,show us the fully grown mushrooms,please.
:D

do you have more pictures of the ready jars,before the speading to newspaper?

the reason for asking is because most of my jars look contaminated ,but when fruited all works fine,strange ehh.

#8 Odin 13

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 01:49 AM

A foaf had a wooden box set up w/ a tire jack which had another board that fit into the box. He would put the paper in the box, crank the jack a bit & squeeze out the water, then add his spawn. He would continue in layers, & in the end had a nice square brick/bag. After the spawn worked it's way thru the paper, he poked the bag w/ a broadhead arrow & the oysters grew thru the holes.

#9 bullfrog

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 02:42 AM

awesome job lazlo. you got a good recycling system for your paper.:eusa_clap
a very nice job , and made me have to try this one. have you seen the pic of the living room chair colonized and fruiting ? i'll try to find it to show you. :bow: great pics as well.

#10 Guest_greysRDbest_*

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 04:54 AM

very nice thread, thanks alot lazlo.

#11 spacecowboy

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 09:12 AM

Cultivating mushrooms of the Oyster variety is very simple using paper products like newspapers, paper bags, shredded cardboard, exc. You'll need to have a substrate for the spawning of the paper product like, colonized grain or a PF style cake.

Nice post, going to do up some 1/2 pint PF jars just to try it out and give you a follow up using P.ostreatus and P.cornucopiae...how many PF/Hippie Mycro jars do you think it would take to do this using lets say a big sunday paper from either LA, KC, STL, NY?

And don't concern yourself with the ink either. Newspaper ink is derived from soy beans, so it's perfectly fine. Although it does stain your hands a bit, but washes off easily with soap and water.


Great point, however, what about the advertisement inserts, might they not use the soy ink?

Myth #4 Newspaper Ink is Toxic to Animals and Humans
One major concern for livestock producers and consumers is the safety of livestock bedded on newspaper containing inks. Until 10 years ago, lead, cadmium and other toxic heavy metals were commonly used in paper inks.

Now, however, most publishers use organic pigments. Most of these pigments are the same as those used in tattoos, lipstick, hair coloring and other cosmetics.

You may have seen the "soy ink" symbol on a newspaper, which tells the reader that the newspaper company is using soybased inks for printing. Soy inks are derived from soybeans, one of Ohio's largest cash crops.

A Pennsylvania State University study of beef steers bedded on newspaper for 140 days revealed no detectable traces of heavy metals in the blood or liver tissues of the animals. It was noted that the paper used was primarily "blackon-white" newsprint and contained a very limited amount of colored inks. Cornell University researchers fed pelletized newspaper at rates of up to 10 percent of the total diet to dairy cows and found no significant risk to human or bovine health.

The newspaper industry has made great efforts to generate a non-toxic waste stream. Printed matter from advertising inserts, catalogs and magazines, however, is not subject to the same voluntary controls of ink quality. Unregulated paper products for bedding of animals that provide meat and milk should be used with caution.

----------------------------------------------------------
http://ohioline.osu....-fact/0136.html

#12 Lazlo

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 11:14 AM

do you have more pictures of the ready jars,before the speading to newspaper?
the reason for asking is because most of my jars look contaminated ,but when fruited all works fine,strange ehh.



No I don't. But the jar looked fine. How do they look contaminated? With bacteria?

And I don't use the inserts either! A lot of them have staples in them that don't feel very good when you're ringing out the paper. Ouch!

4-5 colonized half pints should be plenty. The more the better though.

#13 spacecowboy

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 12:25 PM

4-5 colonized half pints should be plenty. The more the better though.

Cool, then that is what I will do, thx :thumbup:

#14 casgoodie

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 12:29 PM

thanks lazlo, ive been considering baby blue oysters and now i am even closer to doing something about it due to the simplicity. thanks again, i would like to see the mature fruits too! peace

#15 spacecake

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 01:23 PM

Wow...,a nice and cheap way to grow edibles !

Cool Lazlo !

#16 dial8

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 03:15 PM

Ah, very nice laz. Cheap an and environmentally friendly way to grow shrooms. Turns your trash into compost! ME likes a lot!

#17 Cyantific

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 03:29 PM

Good information Lazlo!
Thank you for the write up. :)

#18 Lazlo

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 05:29 PM

A foaf had a wooden box set up w/ a tire jack which had another board that fit into the box. He would put the paper in the box, crank the jack a bit & squeeze out the water, then add his spawn. He would continue in layers, & in the end had a nice square brick/bag. After the spawn worked it's way thru the paper, he poked the bag w/ a broadhead arrow & the oysters grew thru the holes.


You can certainly poke holes around the perimeter of the bag for fruiting. But this way i'm doing it, you have more exposed surface area for fruitbodies to form.

You may be able to simply fruit right in the bag. Just open it, poke a few holes in the bag right above the substrates surface for FAE and keep the sides of the bag misted. I'm sure it would work. Like using the bag as a terrarium. I may try that now that I think of it. For cubensis and Panaeolus, that would be prime time i'd think. Easy as pie also. It sounds easy anyways. :lol:

#19 reverend trips

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 06:03 PM

Cool thread Laz, thanks!

#20 Lazlo

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 12:23 AM

This isolate is PURE white growing on this medium. Very neat, yet weird indeed! It looks nothing like it does growing on sawdust. I'll show you tomorrow with a quick update.




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