Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Casings - RH - fruiting?


  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#1 insight

insight

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 824 posts

Posted 12 February 2005 - 05:06 PM

I usually keep my cakes and casing both in chambers where the RH is around 95-98%. IME, the higher the RH for cakes the better. Is it different for casing where the RH should be lower? I have been doing my casings in 11 x 9 x 2 roasting pans using 60/40 verm/coir. The method I use is I take 1 pan, poke around 10 holes in the bottom, place a layer of wet verm and add substrate. I then place the pan in a second pan (no holes) for excess water to drip to, but also for evaporating back into the top pan. I then cover and let the network rebuild (around 3 days) then apply the casing layer (around 3/4" - 1"), let sit covered 1 day and place in fruiting. My fruiting chamber is a large rubbermaid with wet perlite on the bottom, florescent lighting attached to the top and on a 30 min on/off timer for 14 hours. Is the perlite too much for casing and should it be removed or is high RH good for the casings?



#2 Spark

Spark

    OG

  • Free Member
  • 855 posts

Posted 12 February 2005 - 05:33 PM

You'll get scrawny ass fruits if your RH is too high.

(Message edited by spark on February 12, 2005)

#3 Guest_golly_*

Guest_golly_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 February 2005 - 05:57 PM

The good thing about having plenty RH available in a chamber is that it means u can provide more air exchange or venting without sacrificing too much moisture from the substrate..
You could keep the cakes down at the perlite level and maybe elevate the casings a bit where the atmosphere may be some what warmer drier or closer to a vent ...

#4 insight

insight

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 824 posts

Posted 12 February 2005 - 06:00 PM

What if I just removed the perlite from the casings chamber to decrease humidity altogether?

#5 Guest_golly_*

Guest_golly_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 February 2005 - 06:20 PM

Your cakes might not be as fruitfull but the casings should b fine with some misting...

#6 insight

insight

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 824 posts

Posted 12 February 2005 - 06:36 PM

I have the cakes in a seperate chamber from the casings. The casings fit 2 to a chamber. The cakes sit on top of moist verm in a seperate chamber. I have 4 chambers right now, 3 with casings, 1 with cakes. Im thinking about removing all the perlite from one of the chambers to lower the RH and see if that improves/quickens fruiting time.

#7 Guest_bdog_*

Guest_bdog_*
  • Guest

Posted 12 February 2005 - 07:06 PM

just remove some of the perlite until it gets down to between 70 and 82% or so. i wouldnt take out all the perlite though, as your casing will dry out

#8 skatebowls

skatebowls

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 20 posts

Posted 13 February 2005 - 11:36 AM

Ive been growing casings in perlite-humidified tubs and i pick big fatties everyday...

#9 insight

insight

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 824 posts

Posted 13 February 2005 - 11:39 AM

What does your RH average?

#10 Guest_hippie3_*

Guest_hippie3_*
  • Guest

Posted 13 February 2005 - 11:40 AM

what you really need is more air flow,
that is important for maximum casing performace as you want evaporation to occur and you don't want condensation.
not saying you can't do it with perlite, you can
but yields can be less and contam rates tend to be higher.
the needed circulation of air for casings is why most opt for an electric automated humidifier of some sort instead of perlite in a rubbermaid,
which is more suitable for cakes.

(Message edited by admin on February 13, 2005)

#11 insight

insight

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 824 posts

Posted 13 February 2005 - 11:47 AM

Thats going to be tough. I usually have a fan manually circulate the air 2-3 times a day for around 1-2 minutes each time. I havent built anything yet to automatically circulate the air exchange. Why is air flow so much more important for casings rather than cakes?


#12 Guest_hippie3_*

Guest_hippie3_*
  • Guest

Posted 13 February 2005 - 11:53 AM

Why is air flow so much more important for casings rather than cakes?

it's just the way casings are designed to work.
a casing creates it own humid micro-climate,
trapping air within its' structure
and without proper air circulation
the air becomes stagnant near the surface/interface, slowing transpiration.

#13 insight

insight

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 824 posts

Posted 13 February 2005 - 11:55 AM

Ok. Good info, thanks Hip. I noticed I do have alot of condensation forming on the lid and the sides.

#14 Guest_hippie3_*

Guest_hippie3_*
  • Guest

Posted 13 February 2005 - 11:58 AM

really
a casing is a rubbermaid can do ok
without any perlite at all,
it's self-humidifying,
all you need to do is vent often
and mist the casing every now and then
until pinning begins to maintain the
proper moisture content.

#15 insight

insight

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 824 posts

Posted 13 February 2005 - 12:14 PM

All of the tubs have perlite in them, most had some standing water (my thoughts were to keep RH high). So last night, I strained all of the perlite in one of the tubs in a colander to decrease the RH. I try to keep the casing layer as moist as possible. Pinning has started on all 7 casings and hoping I find that spot where RH is perfect. As an experiment, what if the casings were taken out of the Rubbermaids and placed by themselves, say on a closet shelf and the way they get moisture is by irrigating the sides only and whatever moisture the casing layer has and having a completely open top?

#16 FlyingSausage

FlyingSausage

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 3 posts

Posted 12 April 2005 - 06:51 PM

Hi everybody, this is my first post here and I am in the process of my first grow. I innoculated 12 1/2 pints via PF tek with B+ spores on 3/18 and the 19th. 9 jars have so far been birthed and put into casings. There are 3 jars per casing and I used the 60/40 verm//coir tek found on this site. The casings are sitting in an adapted poor man's pod with a light sitting on top. The temps are around 72 deg. F. with humdity level of "high" according to my crappy digi thermometer.
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
I am a little confused on how I should be watering my casings. I have been misting them about once a day with a hair spray bottle set at the finest mist setting. I can't really tell if the casings are dry or not based on looks alone. Any help or links for help with watering would be appreciated! :D
I was also wondering how long it takes pins to form after birthing the casing. I may have made a mistake with scratching the one casing but I was worried about overlay. Anyways, I hope to start seeing some pins soon!
Thanks for reading, :)

Attached Thumbnails

  • picture644xn.jpg
  • picture633xh.jpg
  • picture621di.jpg


#17 I_am_me

I_am_me

    Odderator

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 2,228 posts

Posted 12 April 2005 - 11:57 PM

Keep up the fresh air exchange too. You could lay a sheet of wax paper on the casing, change it out for a new sheet every couple of days. It will help keep the humidity in the casing layer. Don't tape it down, just lie it on top. Also make sure you don't over mist the casing and get it too wet....usually verm gets lighter as it gets dryer. Also when you see pins forming don't mist anymore, it can hurt the pins.

Best of look, its hard to tell the moisture content from the pictures.

#18 FlyingSausage

FlyingSausage

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 3 posts

Posted 13 April 2005 - 01:17 AM

I am a little worried about the RH being too high so I don't know if the wax paper would help or not. I have read that ideal RH is around 85% for casings, but with my shitty hydrometer I can't really tell where I'm at. Would having too high RH stop the pins from forming? I would also like to know how long a casing such as mine would take to pin. Well, thanks for the reply! Peace~

#19 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 13 April 2005 - 06:48 AM

high rh isn't a huge problem
UNLESS condensation drips/forms on the casing layer itself,
over-saturating it.

#20 cheeseball

cheeseball

    Mycophage

  • Free Member
  • 163 posts

Posted 13 April 2005 - 08:34 AM

My casing hasn't had a problem with high humidity. There is always water on the sides of the walls. Of course, I cased with strictly coir, so I don't really know what I'm doing. Just be sure and watch it and let the casing tell you what it needs.




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!