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Lophophora diffusa or Lophophora williamsii

diffusa lophophora williamsii

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#1 sven77

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 10:16 AM

I just recived what I think is Lophophora diffusa catctus but I am not sure could be Lophophora williamsii . How can I tell the difference?
Later I will post pictures, do you have picture to show?

thanks.

#2 Guest_cap_*

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 10:20 AM

flower color?



moved to botanicals.

#3 Longhorn

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 11:23 AM

Quoted from UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research

"
In The Cactus Family, Edward F. Anderson describes the two species of Lophophora. In L. diffusa the ribs are usually absent, in williamsii they are usually present and well defined. Usually is a problem for people who want definite traits to distinguish their plants. The most definite distinction between the two that I see in the descriptions is that diffusa is described as, "Stems soft, somewhat globose, yellow-green ..." and williamsii is described as, "Stems globose to flattened globose, somewhat firm to the touch, blue-green or occasionally reddish green..." The colour in the two photos Anderson publishes is very distinctly different, diffusa quite yellowish and williamsii quite blueish."

__________________

In Andersons book these points stood out to me.

“Normally the epidermis is covered by both cuticle and wax; the latter substance is primarily responsible for the blue-green or glaucous coloration of L. williamsii.”

But this section makes no mention of L. diffusa.

“The flower color of Lophophora varies from deep reddish-pink to nearly pure white; those of L. diffusa rarely exhibit any red pigmentation, making them usually appear white or sometimes a light yellow because of the reflection of yellow pollen from the center of the flower.”

But even Anderson uses the word rarely, as in there still is pink diffusa. To me it can be used as a clue, but not as a specie description.

“Lophophora seems to stand by itself in possessing a particular combination of morphological characters unlike any other group of cacti. Its nearest relatives appear to be the genera Echinocactus, Obregonia, Pelecyphora, Ariocarpus, and Thelocactus. The character of seeds, seedlings, areoles, and fruits certainly support the contention that peyote belongs in the subtribe Echinocactanae (sensu Britton and Rose) rather than in the more recently proposed "Strombocactus" line of Buxbaum. Perhaps the poorly understood genus Thelocactus may be the single most closely related group.[30]”

#4 Guest_cap_*

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 12:02 PM

But even Anderson uses the word rarely, as in there still is pink diffusa. To me it can be used as a clue, but not as a specie description.

so then what would YOU say is the best way to determine? because the rib thing surely aint it.

if you have seen a thousand lophs and a thousand diffusa its kind of easy to tell the difference just by looking, but even then one can easily be mistaken. the flower color is probably the best determining device, IMO.

cacti are bizzare creatures!

#5 Longhorn

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 12:27 PM

Oh that was all quoted Cap. I agree with you. If you have seen plenty of them then it gets easier to identify.

#6 sven77

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Posted 17 May 2007 - 02:51 PM

here the images of the cactus
I red that diffusa does not contain mescaline where williamsii does contain mescaline.

Attached Thumbnails

  • DSC04157.JPG
  • DSC04156.JPG
  • DSC04154.JPG


#7 Hippie3

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Posted 24 May 2007 - 09:07 PM

you read right.
no expert and the pix are fuzzy
but my guess is williamsii

#8 loochypooch

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 08:45 PM

Looks more like a williamsii to me. The Diffusa var Diffusa doesn't have those white hairy aereoles at all, but there are other varieties of Diffusa that look a lot more like Williamsii, and may very well contain the same alkaloids.

#9 Nunyabiz

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 05:19 PM

In the Kaktusy special 2 it states that diffusa has white flowers. Fricii have very vibrant pink flowers and williamsii has light pink flowers. This is the best way to distinguish the differences IMO.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: diffusa, lophophora, williamsii

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