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Dank-Ass Long Grain Brown Rice Tek


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#1 coastalite

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 08:00 AM

10-step LGBR Tek

This tek is geared for the newbie and will demonstrate how you can use an inexpensive 2 lb. grocery store brand bag of LGBR (long grain brown rice) to produce fast colonizing WMP (wide-mouth pint) jars in just a few days using a simple GB (glove box) and some easy to make potato water/light Karo syrup LC (liquid culture). This is the result of a lot of trial and error to find what works by looking at many other teks and borrowing information from them to share with you in (hopefully) an easy to follow 10-step process that will get you up and running completely through start to end of jar colonization. It does not go beyond jar colonization and is up to you to decide how to proceed from there.

Step 1: Order your multi-spore syringe(s) and extra plungers/needles.
Order your spore syringe from a reputable vendor that is sponsored by mycotopia.net. You are going to also want to order some extra empty sterile syringes and needles. For this tek, get some 16 gauge 1½ inch needles and some 10, 30, or 60cc empty syringes (depending on your needs).

Step 2: Construct a simple GloveBox (GB ).
Get a cardboard box. Cut the four cardboard flaps off the top of the box and get a sheet of clear plastic and tape it on one side to create a hinge so you can easily open and close the lid. Cut two holes in the side of the box for your hands. Get some new dishwashing gloves and use clear packaging tape to tape them in place. You might want to lay a piece of cardboard down inside the box to give you a flat surface to work on. Now you have your ghetto GB ready to roll.

Step 3: Get miscellaneous materials together.
Wait impatiently for your spore syringe(s) to arrive. You’ll also need to gather a few other materials. Get a few gallons of bottled spring water, some breathable/waterproof medical tape (band-aid aisle), some potatoes, some light Karo syrup or light corn syrup, some rice (see step 8), some free Tyvek mailing envelopes from your local USPS office, paper towels, 91% isopropyl rubbing alcohol, and some horticultural grade fine vermiculite (from Taylor’s – about $5).

Step 4: Get your PC and Jars ready.
If you haven’t done so already, you’ll need to get your jars and a PC (pressure cooker) capable of 15 PSI. The PC used in this tek is an aluminum $40 Presto 8-Quart model. It was verified by the company to be rated at 15 PSI and works fine. By all means, go with a bigger one if you can. It will save you a lot of time.

You’ll want to use WMP (wide-mouth pint) jars for this tek. Or you can use WM ½ pint jars or the regular mouth ½ pint jars. By the way, if you can’t find any jars in your area, you can find them at a Taylor’s (doitbest.com) or Ace (acehardware.com). Both places allow you to order them online (tax free) and have them shipped for FREE to your nearest ACE or Taylor’s store for you to pick up in a few days after you order them. The WM Pint jars are about $10 for a 12 pack. Drill each lid with 3/8th holes. It can be a bit tricky to get the holes drilled in perfect circles. Just figure out what works best and go with it. Just be sure to hold the lid firmly in place on top of a stack of newspaper or an old phonebook so that the drill bit doesn’t damage the surface of your workbench.

Step 5: Make the Liquid Culture.
Time to use the multi-spore syringe(s) you ordered! We will be making 4 WMP jars of an awesome potato/light Karo syrup/spring water LC recipe.

Take 4 cups of spring water and add to a medium sized pan that has a tight lid. While you are bringing it to a boil, take a couple of medium-large sized potatoes (any variety – russet were used in this tek), rinse them off good and dice them up with the skin on and add them to the boiling water. Bring it back to a boil, then cover, and then reduce the heat to low/medium-low. Using an electric stove in this tek, the temp was reduced down to simmer at about a 2.5 heat setting. Simmer for 15-20 minutes. Remove the lid and turn off the heat and place the pan on one of the other burners to cool down a bit.

Now, we’re going to filter the potato water through a coffee filter and into a large measuring cup. For this tek a 4-cup capacity Pyrex glass measuring cup was used. If you have a coffeemaker, you can use the basket and place it over your large Pyrex or bowl. Put a filter in and pour some potato water into the coffee filter. A fork was used to keep the lever on the basket pushed down to allow the water to be filtered through. To speed up the process, you can pour about an inch at a time into the filter and squeeze the water out by hand. You do this by lifting the coffee filter up around the edges, crimping it together and twisting it up. As you are twisting, squeeze the filter gently and the water will seep out. You will have to repeat this process using a new filter each time until you have 2 cups of potato water. Be careful though, that water is hot! We’re just trying to filter most of the potato particles out of the water. OK, now we have our potato water that’s rich in nutrients and dextrose, which the mycelium will love you for. At this point you can either eat or discard the potatoes. Take 5 Tablespoons of Light-Karo-syrup or light corn syrup and mix it in really well into the 2 cups of potato water that you just filtered. Next, add 6 cups of spring water and stir it in really well. A gallon jug is about $1 at the grocery store. Go ahead and get 2-3 gallons.

Wash 4 of your lids, bands, and pint jars and rinse them well to get all the soap off. Fill each jar halfway with the karo/potato water solution that you just stirred up. You’ll have some leftover potato/Karo water, so you can either use it in additional jars or throw it away. If you find you don’t need that much you can halve the entire recipe. Also, if you have a bag of marbles, wash and rinse them and add about 3-4 per jar. They’ll help break up the clumps of mycelium when it comes time to swirl the water around in the jars. The marbles are optional IMO. Cover the jars with the lids rubber-side down and take 2 layers of Tyvek that you will have already cut up from the USPS envelopes and place them over the lids. Then screw the bands on till they’re snug but not too tight. Then place 2 layers of aluminum foil and crimp it down tightly over the lids and sides of the jars. Before you put them into the PC, it has been suggested that you crumple a few balls of foil and place them on the bottom of the PC, then you put your rack in on top of the balls of foil. This helps to keep the jars off the bottom of the PC. You may also want to place a washcloth on top of the rack and then place the jars on top of the washcloth. This will help prevent the Karo from getting too caramelized (yellow) but if it does, don’t worry about it, it’ll still work great.

Now, place your 4 jars of karo/potato water in the PC and fill the PC with 2-3 inches of water and bring to a boil. Once boiling, secure and lock the lid on the PC and let the pressure begin to build up with the burner setting to about 8 and wait a few minutes. If you have a different PC, make sure you read the manual. The locking pin will eventually pop up and from this point, let the PC vent some steam for a couple minutes, then put your jiggler (pressure regulator) on top of the lid and wait a few more minutes until it starts to wobble. Once wobbling begins, turn the heat down to the lowest temperature that will allow a continuous slight wobbling at all times. If it’s wobbling, it’s at 15 PSI. It has been found that a burner setting of 3-5 works good to keep at a steady 15 PSI, but obviously your results may vary. If you are at higher altitudes, you’ll want to do some research to find out the correct PSI and/or cooking times. Anyway, once the jiggler starts wobbling, start the timer for 30 minutes. When 30 minutes is up, turn off heat and take the PC of the hot burner. Let it cool down on its own. For this particular PC, it only takes about 20 minutes for the PC to depressurize, and for the locking pin to drop back down. Once that happens, remove the jiggler first to make sure no more pressure is in the PC. Then remove the cover/lid. Take out the jars and remove the foil and tighten the lids. You may need to use a clean paper towel to dry off any moisture that formed on top of the Tyvek lid. Let the jars cool for several hours till they are at room temperature. You can put them in your GB to cool down if you want.

Step 6: Inoculate your jars with your multi-spore syringe.
In your GB , inject 1-2cc’s of spores per syringe into each jar of your potato/Karo water solution. A damp paper towel with 91% isopropyl rubbing alcohol was used inside the GB along with a lighter to flame the needle. Also, wipe the Tyvek with the alcohol where you’ll be doing the injection. Flame the needle, wipe it, shake it, and inject it through the Tyvek/lid. Put the needle cap back on and store somewhere cool for later use. Put a piece of breathable/waterproof medical tape (band-aid aisle) over the injection hole each time you make an injection hole through the Tyvek. Cut a small square of masking tape, label it, and tape it to the jar so you’ll know what it is and the date it was made, etc. Keep them somewhere at mid 70’s to low 80’s temp. At least once a day, you should swirl the water around in the jars. You should notice mycelium growth in as little as a day or two. In no more than 7-10 days you should have a nice batch that will hopefully be looking like the B+ pictured below.




Step 7: Load your empty/sterile syringes with mycelium LC.
When your LC looks good and ready, it’s time to suck up the mycelium into your empty syringes. Place your 4 LC jars in the GB along with your needles and masking tape pre-labeled syringes. Because the mycelium is so thick, we will need the larger 16 gauge needle to suck it up much easier than with an 18 gauge. Wet down a paper towel with 91% and put in the GB. Put a lighter in the GB. Now secure the GB lid down with tape if you want a tighter fit. Put your hands in the gloves and get to work. Assemble your empty syringe and take the needle guard off. Wipe the needle with the paper towel and then put the paper towel down. Hold up the needle and take the lighter to the needle. You’ll want to flame it for several seconds and get it nice and glowing red. Then you can wipe the needle again with the alcohol paper towel to get the black residue off the needle. Wipe the Tyvek that’s covering one of the holes on the jars with the wet alcohol paper towel. Insert the needle, swirl the jar around. Tilt the jar so the tip of the needle is in the liquid and draw back the plunger till it’s full. Your 10cc syringe will probably hold around 12cc’s if you fill her all the way up. Cap the needle and set it aside. Repeat the process till you fill all your syringes. Store them in a cool dark place inside a Ziploc bag for later use. Don’t forget to label them.

Step 8: Preparing the Long Grain Brown Rice.
The rice used is a 2 lb. bag of Food Lion brand long grain natural brown rice at $1.39. Get a few bags. Measure out 3 cups of rice and dump into a large pan that has a tight lid. Measure out 5 cups of bottled spring water and pour it in the pan with the rice. Cover and bring to a boil. Once it reaches a fast boil, reduce the heat to around 2.5 (low/med low) and time it for 40 minutes. Do not open the lid at all during the 40 minutes. Once the 40 minutes is up, turn off the burner and sit it on one of your other burners to cool down and open the lid and fluff it up. Cover it back up and time for another 10 minutes to let it cool a bit and evaporate any remaining water. Then fluff it up again. The rice should be nice and sticky and fluffy with no more water in the pan.

While the rice is cooking, go ahead and get your WMP jars ready. Wash the lids, bands and jars and thoroughly rinse them and turn them upside down to drain out on a clean paper towel. Then take a fork to your rice and fill one of the jars up to the first thread. As you are filling the jar, be careful not to compact the rice down too much. Give it a couple of side to side shakes if there are any large pockets of air. Once it’s filled to the first thread, take a clean damp paper towel and wipe all the way around the inside top of the jar. Now, take your vermiculite and fill the jar the rest of the way and level it off. Now place one of the lids rubber side down. Next, screw the band on a bit snug but not too tight. Cover tightly with two layers of foil. Place them into the PC and this time cook for 45 minutes. Don’t start the timer till the jiggler starts wobbling. Once it’s finished, remove the PC from the burner and let it cool till the pin drops which should take about 20 minutes or so. While the PC is going for 45 minutes, start another batch of rice. Repeat the process till you have all the jars done. When you remove each of the jars from the PC, take the foil off and reuse it for the next batch. The vermiculite layer should be dry and will act as a protective barrier to keep the contams out (hopefully). Screw the bands on tight. Do this for each jar. Let the jars cool for several hours before inoculating them. You can put them in the GB or back in the box they came in. Three cups of rice and five cups of spring water will be enough to fill 5 WMP jars (or 10 ½ pint jars) and have enough left over for a healthy snack. 5 WMP jars at a time are all that will fit in the 8 quart PC. Or you can fit 10 WM ½ pint jars or 8 regular ½ pint jars in this particular 8 quart PC.

Step 9: Inoculate your Long Grain Brown Rice Jars.
The jars have cooled for several hours or overnight and are now at room temperature. Place the jars of rice in the GB. For this tek, you can inoculate each pint jar with 2-4cc’s of your LC. If using ½ pint jars, use 2 cc’s per jar. Place your 91% soaked alcohol paper towel and labeled syringes in the GB along with your lighter. Secure the lid on the GB and stick your hands in the gloves. Flame, wipe and shake the needle. Hold one of the jars and tilt it at an angle and insert the needle tip as far in as it will go, keeping the tip against the side of the glass. Inject some LC in each hole. You might want to flame, wipe, and shake after each jar to reduce your chances of contamination. Once you’ve finished, remove your jars from the GB along with the used paper towel and used syringe(s). You might want to gently shake each jar (side to side) after inoculation to redistribute the vermiculite layer around a bit in case the needle left a hole in the barrier. Cut some small pieces of masking tape and stick one on the top of each lid but be careful not to cover any of the holes. Label the strain and date on each piece of tape with a fine point marker or a pen. Repeat the process till all your jars are done. Put them somewhere where the temp is mid to upper 70’s to low 80’s. After incubating for a few days, your jars should be looking white and fuzzy.

Step 10: Decide how you are going to fruit them.
Will you be casing them or growing them PF style on damp perlite? Or, maybe you might try growing them invitro (in glass) and use mini terrariums for each cake. There are a lot of different options. Experiment and find one that works well for you. Good luck and hopefully you will soon be enjoying the fruits of your labor!

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#2 Guest_vinz_*

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 09:17 AM

this is interesting!
since im from the philippines, rice is always on our dining tables..
im wondering if the rice prep you mentioned is to cook the rice?
does the rice come out sticky? dry? cooked or just hydrated? is it grainy?
can you use a rice cooker for what you mentioned?
rice cookers work this way: 2 cups of rice + 3-4 cups of water and cook for 20minutes in the rice cooker
i know brown rice comes out not so sticky has white rice

id be happy if you could post some pictures of the rice..

#3 coastalite

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 01:19 PM

yeah, you cook the rice covered for 40 minutes on the stove at med/low till just about all the water has evaporated. Then you turn off stove, remove from heat and uncover the pot and stir the rice really well. Place the cover back on for 5 minutes to let any remaining water evaporate. then you're done. the rice should be cooked thru, but because we are using less water than what calls for on the bag of rice, the rice will be slightly hard when you bite into it, but it will still be done enough to eat. the rice will get very sticky as you let it sit there uncovered. it gets so sticky that you have to wet your finger with water when you gently tamp it down (to get rid of large air pockets) otherwise, the rice will stick to your fingers like a motherflucker.

from what i understand, the trick is to use either "natural" or "organic" LONG GRAIN BROWN RICE. Do not use white rice. I've never tried a rice cooker, but i don't see why that wouldn't work.

one advantage of using this method is that you don't need to use nearly as much vermiculite as the regular PF Tek. it's all cooked brown rice with a top layer of fine verm. you can also add a bottom thin layer of verm and DEC right in the jar. other advantages are that the jars seem to colonize faster, no more need to buy brown rice flour or grind your own, and you no longer have to worry about mixing flour/verm/water in a bowl and wondering if you got the ratios correct. saves time and hassle IMO.

I'd be interested in hearing some feedback from some of the veterans here. because there is no verm mixed in with the rice, i'm assuming it might be harder to keep your cakes hydrated properly? which is why i think a vaccuum dunk works good for these cakes between flushes.

#4 Hippie3

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 02:13 PM

pure rice cakes , no vermiculite
see > 9er tek <

#5 SWIM

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 02:33 PM

I've been using whole grain brown rice, cooked more or less per the less detailed 9er/Zila tek. I decided that the absence of verm was causing hydration issues, so I started adding field capacity coir, or coir with some worm castings, at a mix of 4 parts cooked rice to one part coir. I've been real happy with the results. I've been working with a very rhizo substrain of Z, and I've had full pint jars colonize all the way thru in 14 days. Yield and flushing times have also been better than I saw with the PF mix or unsupplemented WGBR.

#6 coastalite

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 11:45 AM

here you go. this is a jar using the above tek with TX. After 19 days, the jars were colonized and starting to pin.

Attached Thumbnails

  • TX 19 day LC.jpg


#7 coastalite

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 11:58 AM

interesting that a couple of the TX started pinning at ONLY 19 days. some of them were birthed at 20 days and done 9er-tek casing method. the B+ was fully colonized after 19 days but was not pinning yet so they were birthed, DEC, and stuck in qt jars chronic style. The Cambo's are not finished colonizing - not sure what method they will be done for fruiting yet - they are the SLOWEST colonizers out of these 4 strains my foaf is working with. The GT's are fully colonized but not pinning yet and not sure on their fruiting strategy either.

can anyone suggest what these strains prefer as far as fruiting goes??? should they be DEC and put in a terrarium? chronic? invitro? crumbled up and cased?

what fruiting method works best for B+, TX, GT, and cambo in your opinion?

#8 Hippie3

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 12:04 PM

there is no single 'best' method,
you have many choices.

#9 Guest_vinz_*

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 12:26 PM

cambos are supposed to be fast..

id go crumble and case/ use the cakes as spawn for bulk/ DEC:)

#10 coastalite

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 12:35 PM

Yeah, my foaf thought cambos were supposed to be fast, but they are definitely taking longer to colonize than B+, GT, & TX, at least this time around. Maybe they prefer regular PF style vs. cooked LGBR (as per 9er/zila teks)? Seems to be so many dod gamned variables. Just roll the dice and see what happens, eh?

#11 Hippie3

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Posted 06 June 2007 - 02:03 PM

until you have a decent isolate with which to work,
that's pretty much the way it goes.

#12 SWIM

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 03:08 PM

I just happen to be working with cambos also. On my augmented LGBR a multispore inoculation is vastly slower than my Z substrain. Nothing against cambos; just try some different tek if you want to grow them.

#13 ride-like-hell

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 01:33 AM

nice tek... easy to follow and... i found old rice from the fridge colonized very fast, but nut levels declined and had to nut/ dunk between flushes. thanks for the post, going into learning disabled tek favs.

#14 Sunstar

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 10:55 AM

have you ever tried using the potatoe water for the water you cook the rice in?

#15 coastalite

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 03:27 PM

hmmmm.... interesting idea. may have to try that sometime. thnx for the suggestion sunstar.

#16 Hippie3

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 03:37 PM

have you ever tried using the potatoe water for the water you cook the rice in?

i wouldn't, rice is starchy enough
and potato water is more starch.
use a poo tea instead imo .

#17 Sunstar

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 04:52 PM

poo tea is an excellent idea.Would earthjuice or fox farms big bud mixture with guano work as well do you think
Diluted of course to the regular mixture of water. Ok that makes a new experiment one with potato water one regular and one mixed with poo water. I'll post the results in my potato water and brown rice thread

#18 coastalite

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 10:24 AM

yeah, this is basically the 9-er and zila tek. it works and is easier than mixing brf and verm IMO.

i was wondering if using an old LC (5-6 months old - kept at room temp and never refrigerated)might have been the reason the fruits from each strain were harvested as little fat-asses??? They would grow short and fat but not tall.

Could it have been as simple as using a not-so-fresh LC?

#19 lit

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 05:07 PM

hmm do you absolutely need 16 gauge needles? or can you make do with spare sterilized previously used syringes?

#20 coastalite

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 08:15 PM

hmm do you absolutely need 16 gauge needles? or can you make do with spare sterilized previously used syringes?


you can try the 18 gauge, but the needle hole is quite a bit smaller than the 16 gauge. you'll just have a tougher time drawing up the syringes.

Maybe some of the sponsored vendors here could offer us a choice in needle gauge when ordering multispore syringes? That would be nice. The 18 is fine for spores but the 16 is really the way to go for the much thicker LC syringes. I mean, really it's worth the investment because you'll end up saving money in the long run being by being self-sufficient with your own LC so that you don't have to keep ordering multispore syringes. This LC recipe can turn your 1 vendor-supplied multispore syringe into 100's if not 1000's of your own LC syringes. Not bad for a few potatoes, some H20, and light karo.




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