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#1 spacecake

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 11:08 AM

Is there anyone with experiance using leds insted of normal light ?
I haven't got room for a normal light in my incubator,and the incubator is running at 12 volts.
Are leds the solution to my problem ?
I'm thinking of drilling holes in the top of my incubator and putting the leds in the holes with a little glue.

#2 shobimono

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 11:15 AM

Unless you are growing invitro, you don't want light in your incubator.

#3 spacecake

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 11:29 AM

No,no,I only want to experiment with giving them light the week before full colonisation !

#4 MNL

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 11:50 AM

Connect the 12V supply to a 7805 regulator, it will give you five volts. Then use a resistor (10K, 2.2K?, you will see how the brightness varies with different values) on one wire of the LED to keep the LEDS from blowing out. I know of an electronics store if you need a source.

Edit: I said diode, but ment LED, dispite that they are one in the same. I fixed.

#5 spacecake

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 12:01 PM

Hi ! MNL ... You don't have to explane,i'm an electrician ! (with 12volts you need a 1k ohm resistor)
But I don't now if the leds sends out the right kind of light (spectrum) !

#6 MNL

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 12:05 PM

Here are two diagrams for you.

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#7 MNL

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 12:07 PM

I just saw your post! Ha. I dont know about the spectrum, perhaps in the archive. LEDS come in narrow ranges so it might be possible to choose one in the correct range.

#8 spacecake

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 12:22 PM

Seems to me,I have to use blue leds,..but there isn't much info in the old archives on this subject !

#9 nomoreusmc

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 04:25 PM

interesting idea

#10 nerve

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 04:37 PM

I routinely use an LED headlamp inside my stealth invitro box,
when i know i won't be able to open it for light for a while.

#11 insight

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 04:56 PM

I know that if you stare at LEDs while your head is spinnin, never mind, thats a different subject.

#12 Guest_golly_*

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 06:21 PM

The newer high brightness white and lightblue should do well ,if u can find ones that dont have too narrow a beam ..U can just hook 5 in series to 12vdc without a resistor but check the current to be sure.

#13 destroy_erase_improve

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 09:19 PM

can anyone explain to me what an LED type light is?

#14 MNL

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Posted 26 March 2005 - 03:34 AM

Light Emitting Diode

a diode because current only flows one way. Light emetting because.....

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#15 Guest_golly_*

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Posted 26 March 2005 - 08:02 AM

They are also the most efficient way of converting electricity into light with less heat. Lasting for many years these little lights are becoming more adaptable as the newer types become more powerfull...They may even replace Metal Halide grow lights one day...

#16 destroy_erase_improve

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Posted 26 March 2005 - 11:03 AM

the current flows one way on an LED, as opposed to a regular light where it flows in two directions?

#17 spacecake

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Posted 26 March 2005 - 11:37 AM

Yes,it's polarity sensitive,and doesn't use much power !
I found a led that has bleu light with a range of 470nm / 2700 mcd light.
I think I'm going to order a couple of these...




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