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Looking for info on the Oh Canada! Strain


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#1 gyva

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 08:06 PM

Has anything been compiled on this strain, I'm interested in pics or grow logs of people trying this in outdoor cooler climates.



Gyva...

#2 apokalypse

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 08:27 PM

http://mycotopia.net...can-you-go.html found this for ya!

#3 gyva

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 09:25 PM

Thanks, I've read everything popping up at the bottom of the screen, Anything newer than 2006? Although I understand we wont be seeing any fruits now till fall, but is anyone keeping track of other varibles as fall approaches...

This on is hard to search for as the "Oh" is too little for your search engine.

And just as a side note I like "Oh Canada" better than naming it the captain or something ha ha,,, as the name Canada I associate with COLD!

Gyva...

#4 gyva

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 04:36 PM

wow, nothing huh....

#5 Hippie3

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 04:50 PM

this strain has never really caught on,
even years later i have still not seen
any grow reports of good results.

#6 gyva

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 05:44 PM

Well if you see this Max, have you been testing this one further?

#7 Hippie3

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 06:45 PM

sent max a pm for ya

#8 max

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 04:34 PM

This is a strain we came out with just in the past couple years. Not a big seller but it's a bit of a long term project to establish a good outdoor plot over spring and summer and then hope for fruiting in the fall if weather conditions are right. Haven't add too many reports from customers, but then again success would take several months during which time many people might lose interest. It does take a lot of patience. Most people I've heard from are trying it indoors and frankly, the only time I've seen fruiting was in an experimental outdoor plot when it was extremely wet and near freezing. As a recall, the few flushes I saw occurred after very heavy rainfall's.

The land our outdoor plot was on is now under the control of others. I think they turned it into a potatoe patch!

#9 gyva

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 07:02 PM

So after the one plot was taking over by potato's all work on your part has ceased? or will you be giving us a fall report on another spotted plot? And if you have spotted another plot, what does it seem to be growing on naturally and any other specs on the growing thus far... Thanks..



Gyva/Psilocybetees :)

#10 Workman

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 10:46 PM

After examining this picture at sporelab.com I am doubtful that this is a strain of Psilocybe cubensis. The stem is more characteristic of a temperate woodlover and the mushroom overall resembles P. cyanofibrillosa or a similar species. This would explain the fruiting in such extremely cold and wet conditions and the difficulty in fruiting indoors. If any dried material was available I could confirm the species microscopically. Its not unknown for local species of Psilocybes to colonize beds spawned with other species. It might even be an undescribed species, but I find it hard to believe its a strain of P. cubensis and that is not necessarily a bad thing.

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#11 Hippie3

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 07:42 AM

i too thought that photo was a bit odd looking,
your theory might explain it
also isn't this strain a red spore?
not cubie purple

#12 blackout

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 08:08 AM

I had always thought it was developed from the B+ strain, dunno if I read that on the captains forums, or if I dreamt it up!

#13 Workman

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 11:05 AM

i too thought that photo was a bit odd looking,
your theory might explain it
also isn't this strain a red spore?
not cubie purple


That is right, I totally forgot about that.

Just to satisfy my own curiosity, I'd be willing to check it out and even propogate it if possible. I'd even donate any resulting prints back to sporelab or mycotopia since sporeworks doesn't like to duplicate offerings originating on existing sites. But my charity ends there since I don't want to actually purchase the spores.

#14 max

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 01:28 PM

Lets get something straight here....the mushrooms that grew from my Oh Canada plot were Ps. cubensis. Fresh specimens were obviously cubs
and considering that the plot was spawned with nothing but cubensis mycellium on straw and compost, it came as no surprise except for the fact that it fruited in cool temps. These did not grow off wood, they are not Ps. cyanofibrillosa, a small (approx 2 inch) woodloving mushroom which I have never even seen in this area let alone anywhere in the vicinity of the plot. These were full size cubensis mushrooms up to 6 inches tall and this picture of a frozen remain certainly doesn't do justice. I have many years experience identifying dozens of edible, medicinal and other mushrooms of this area, my reputation as a local amateur mycologist is well known and I have been mentioned in local papers many times and have spent hours id'ing mushrooms for the public at our mycological shows over several years. I know what apples look like, I know what oranges look like and I certainly know what cubensis look like. What a coincidence that they would be found growing in a plot specifically designed to produce them! Thanks for the offer Workman but...I already know what they are.

I'll also mention that only a small percentage of our overall customer base comes from this website and prolly only a handful of mycotopiates even ordered these. And considering the time needed to establish an outdoor plot and the obvious lack of patience most people exhibit, I'm not the least bit surprised that there is not a page full of grow reports!

#15 Workman

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 02:55 PM

Whoa! I'm not trying to start an argument. Obviously I am working with limited information since I have nothing to work with other than your picture and what you have said about its habits. But the information is conflicting and I only offered to resolve the issue. When I mentioned Psilocybe cyanofibrillosa I was really thinking about this unnamed temperate woodloving species that grows quite a bit larger and looks very similar to your image. It was found in Washington State which shares many species with British Columbia. See picture below. Outdoor beds are subjected to the whims of nature and often produce mushrooms of unintended species.

I'll concede to your identification and consider the matter closed. I am certain your identification skills are far superior to my own and I can only hope to be as famous as yourself. Now if I could only get that apple orange thing figured out.

http://sporeworks.co...php?imageid=157

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#16 CoyoteMesc

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 03:15 PM

Wow!

#17 Hippie3

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 03:53 PM

one wonders why, max, you're using a picture you say =
this picture of a frozen remain certainly doesn't do justice
to advertize it on your website ?
are there no better pictures to be found anywhere ?


only a small percentage of our overall customer base comes from this website and prolly only a handful of mycotopiates even ordered these. And considering the time needed to establish an outdoor plot and the obvious lack of patience most people exhibit, I'm not the least bit surprised that there is not a page full of grow reports!


not only are there no SUCCESSFUL grow reports here, just a few failures
but i haven't seen successes ANYWHERE
not even on your own site.
only a bare handful of threads on your site
even mention it
and i see ZERO success there.
there's only one thread over at shroomery,
a site considerably larger than both of ours.
and it's just a mention of it,
not a grow log.
out of the 3 major sites
here at topia are the ONLY actual grow reports
on the web unless i'm missing some you'd like to point to, max ??

#18 Hippie3

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 04:02 PM

P.S.

if it's cubensis why can't folks get it to grow ?
doesn't make sense to say
it's a cubensis
when it doesn't even grow like a cubensis.

cubies are fall-down easy to grow
and do not take years nor special low temperature ranges

at the best your oh canada must be a distinct sub-species to have
such substantial differences in its growth
from every other cubensis strain,
1 out of over 100.

#19 Cowcharmer

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Posted 15 July 2007 - 04:43 PM

hmm...Some one has got to study this strain a little more.
It is odd for a cubensis to be hard to grow.

hmmm

#20 max

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Posted 16 July 2007 - 06:23 AM

Obviously it's a unique substrain, prolly something similiar to a cold-loving strain I've seen rychehawk carry. Considering the time and effort needed, I never expected it to be as popular as any indoor strain. I'll also mention that only a small percentage of customers are actually members of any forums. If anyone thinks for one second that everyone in this hobby is also a member of any of the forums and posting results of everything they try...think again!




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