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Found Fresh Horse Poo, Want Fire Fang / Composted Poo


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46 replies to this topic

#1 ncweedfarmer

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 10:18 AM

I am new to growing mushroom.
I have horse so i have lots of horse manure to use.
some my horse manure range from 2 weeks old to 5 yr.
some of it has hay and wood chips mix with it.
My questions is can i grow mushroom in it.
how old does the horse manure need to be and what should be mix with it. also any links or thread about using horse manure that i can read would also be nice.
thanks

#2 Guest_greysRDbest_*

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 10:35 AM

welcome to mycotopia!
theres a section in the archives about this
hope this helps!

http://mycotopia.net...splay.php?f=101

#3 Soliver1

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 12:24 PM

Horse poo with hay mixed in is PERFECT for growing bulk shrooms. As long as it no longer smells like actual shit, you can use it, IME.

:)

#4 hyphaenation

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 12:38 PM

I have been using well composted goat manure, but am about to experiment with neighbours horse poo. The only thing is that a lot of it is mixed with fresh poo. Its hard to find a pile thats completely comnposted. Is there a simple way to help the composting of the horse manure along? I've seen plans on here for the compost steamer (looks like a 30 year old pictoral).

Could you heat it, roll it around and flip it, cover it with a tarp? Or anything else to hurry it along so you can work with it?

thx

#5 joey_megabucks

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 09:11 PM

I am curious whether or not the composted "wood shavings" change the ph of the final manure. Can the larger, uncomposted shavings be included in the bulk substrate? Or should the manure be seperated from it?

#6 golly

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Posted 21 March 2007 - 07:38 AM

Hardwood shavings are only slightly acidic like Coir..Fresh pine shavings should be avoided imo as they can be oily..
If u are composting a mix of poop/chips ,then lime is normally added to the pile, to speed decomposition..
Larger wood chunks would normally be removed B4 making substrate...

#7 Doctor D

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 02:06 PM

Hey guys,

I just picked up a ton of horse shit from a horse grower. Well, not quite a ton but I got a good amount. Some of it was very old, and composted to the point it was like dirt. Is this the kind I want to use?

I also got a bit of newish manure that was still clumpy, still looked like horse manure. Do I need to compost this further or leach it somehow?

How can I store this until I'm ready to use it? Currently, I have about 4 large garbage bags full stuffed in a garbage can. I assume I cannot keep them like this for an extended period of time.

How about if I dump out all the manure into the garbage can, keep the lid removed, then occasionally turn the contents over?

Help, please!

#8 golly

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 03:23 PM

I would spread it out on a tarp outside and dry the poo for storage..
The really fresh stuff can be placed in a large black trash bag, moist and leave in a sunny spot to compost a bit..
ventilate the bag occasionally and stir...

#9 Guest_Dipole_*

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 03:45 PM

Posted Image
Don't forget to use your hands and wash afterwards.

#10 Doctor D

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 05:27 PM

I would spread it out on a tarp outside and dry the poo for storage..
The really fresh stuff can be placed in a large black trash bag, moist and leave in a sunny spot to compost a bit..
ventilate the bag occasionally and stir...


So once it's dried, can I bag it up into Ziplock freezer bags for long-term storage? Right now the stuff is very wet due to rain.

How about the manure that has been composted to the consistency of dirt? Is that still useful for mushrooms?

#11 Hippie3

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 05:56 PM

yes.
btw the picture reminds me--
be cautious handling manure
as it can carry diseases
that can infect humans.
Posted Image
gloves and a dust mask
might be wise.

#12 Guest_Dipole_*

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 06:04 PM

I thought I would put this out, don't know for sure if it is true. I remember having a doctor who said that tetanus is found around horses. That sounds like poo to me too.

#13 Lefty

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 09:15 AM

Since this is in General & not the myco forum, I must ask if constipating the horse is an option?

#14 TVCasualty

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 11:22 AM

I thought I would put this out, don't know for sure if it is true. I remember having a doctor who said that tetanus is found around horses. That sounds like poo to me too.


Quick trip to wikipedia produces:

Tetanus is a global health problem since C. tetani and Geravium tetani spores are ubiquitous. The disease occurs almost exclusively in persons who are unvaccinated or inadequately immunized.[1] Tetanus occurs worldwide but is more common in hot, damp climates with soil rich in organic matter. This is particularly true with manure-treated soils, the spores are widely distributed in the intestines and feces of many non-human animals such as horses, sheep, cattle, dogs, cats, rats, guinea pigs, and chickens. In agricultural areas, a significant number of human adults may harbor the organism. The spores can also be found on skin surfaces and in contaminated heroin.[2]

Tetanus, particularly the neonatal form, remains a significant public health problem in non-industrialized countries. There are about one million cases of tetanus reported worldwide, causing an estimated 300,000 to 500,000 deaths each year.[2]

In the US, there are less than 100 cases and approximately five deaths each year.[5] Nearly all of the cases in the US occur in unimmunized individuals or individuals who have allowed their inoculations to lapse, whereas most cases in developing countries are due to the neonatal form of tetanus.


The "contaminated heroin" part surprised me.

#15 Doctor D

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 11:30 AM

yes.
btw the picture reminds me--
be cautious handling manure
as it can carry diseases
that can infect humans.


Funny that you mention it, because I did bring gloves, and the lady joked that she could tell I "wasn't a horse person" because of them. Apparently horse people have no qualms handling horse shit.

#16 Doctor D

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 11:32 AM

Since this is in General & not the myco forum, I must ask if constipating the horse is an option?


That would be problematic, as I do not have the space to store a horse. Way to think outside the box, though.

#17 TVCasualty

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 12:30 PM

That would be problematic, as I do not have the space to store a horse. Way to think outside the box, though.


Think again, Doctor D!

Standing just 17 inches tall, she is never going to be a champion show-jumper.

In fact, the tiny mare is so small she would struggle to leap over a bucket.

But such things are of little concern for feisty Thumbelina who has just been officially recognised as the world's smallest horse.

The five-year-old received the title from the Guinness Book of Records after her astonished owners realised she was never going to grow any bigger.

She was born on a farm in America to a couple who specialise in breeding miniature horses.

These popular show horses usually weigh about 250lb and reach a height of 34 inches when they are fully grown.


Now apartment dwellers can get into equestrian pursuits...and make their own substrate!

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1176658184

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#18 Doctor D

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 12:37 PM

I stand corrected! :bow:

#19 Guest_Dipole_*

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 12:41 PM

I bet the big horse is thinking...:hitit:

#20 Lefty

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 02:42 PM

Oh, I thought you had the horse. Then access is the problem, or he's not regular or some such?
The tetanus thing is interesting. It has always amazed me how people just buy shit from wherever & slam it w/o recrystallizing it or anything and don't die more often. No one wants to off their customers but greed far out weighs health concerns in that realm.




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