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Found Fresh Horse Poo, Want Fire Fang / Composted Poo


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#21 CoyoteMesc

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 03:11 PM

Funny that you mention it, because I did bring gloves, and the lady joked that she could tell I "wasn't a horse person" because of them. Apparently horse people have no qualms handling horse shit.


It was probably the type/style of gloves that you chose that made you look out of place...lol
Gloves are use by many/most "horse people", lol

even shovels and other garden tools are nice.:)

#22 Hippie3

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 03:32 PM

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1176658184

clone that one...

#23 Guest_Dipole_*

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 05:00 PM

I wouldn't be surprised if people in the past were not so susceptible to tetanus because they were constantly exposed to low levels of the stuff. Polio only became a problem when people started cleaning up the streets and homes. When people were living in a world of feces including everyone elses the polio going around was not very virulent. People got exposed to the easy stuff. When a bad one came around most people were already naturally emunized. That changed a 100 or so years ago.

The numbers of horses that died on a daily basis in NYC and the tonage of manure that had to be swept up was hard to believe. I bet the first thing that a time traveler would do when stepping into a large city at that time would be to vomit just from the smell alone.

#24 TVCasualty

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:50 AM

I wouldn't be surprised if people in the past were not so susceptible to tetanus because they were constantly exposed to low levels of the stuff. Polio only became a problem when people started cleaning up the streets and homes. When people were living in a world of feces including everyone elses the polio going around was not very virulent. People got exposed to the easy stuff. When a bad one came around most people were already naturally emunized. That changed a 100 or so years ago.The numbers of horses that died on a daily basis in NYC and the tonage of manure that had to be swept up was hard to believe. I bet the first thing that a time traveler would do when stepping into a large city at that time would be to vomit just from the smell alone.


So that explains why polio has recently taken over, and there are people everywhere with leg-braces and crutches...Hmmm... I think you have it slightly backwards, though resistant strains of some diseases are changing the equation again.

Shitloads of people used to die from tetanus; as one example just imagine those Civil War battlefields (often pastures) where men often stabbed each other with their rusty semi-dull sabers soaked with pasture mud, likely teeming with all sorts of nastiness... more death came from infection and disease than bullets or cannonballs or old age.

I remember seeing an ad for the first cars, in the NY Times archives. It claimed "Cars: They don't stink, you don't have to feed them, and they don't fill up the streets with poop" (I paraphrased the ad of course).

I don't know about those old cars, but I have to 'feed' mine quite often, urban areas are choked with stinky exhaust, and the streets may not be filled with poop but are still no place to drop your sandwich. Inner cities used to smell like a horse barn, but at least it's not overtly toxic like exhaust (especially from when gas was still leaded) or dangerous like the particulates from diesel vehicles. And of course my car does not mate with another car and give me new cars, like horses did. The smell of NY is still vomit-inducing on the right days, it's all about what you're used to, and I think horses are a better deal than cars mostly. You wait, we will return to them within our lifetime as our primary transportation. ;)


Hip: I'm already busy trying to clone this sexy babe first, since there has already been proven success with sheep I thought it'd be easier. My opinion is that if we are going to go to the trouble of cloning sheep, we should at least clone the hot ones!

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1176734389

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#25 Hippie3

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:52 AM

:hitit:

#26 TVCasualty

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:57 AM

:hitit:


Get in line.

This poor guy has been waiting for this technology for 20 years, and he's obviously getting impatient.


http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1176735337

P.S.- Sorry about your thread, Doctor D... :o

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#27 Beast

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 02:44 PM

Hi there. A couple days ago, I noticed a rather large pile of fresh horse poo on the side of the road in the middle of the bike lane. You know what I was thinking, don't you?

"Free poo! Yess! :headbang:"


So I parked, obtained a plastic bag from a gas station, walked over to the pile, and scooped it all up in the bag. There was alot more than at first glance, though the bag was big enough to contain it all.

Brought it home, and read up on fire fang and compost preparation in the Trusty 'ol Vaults.


Turns out I need, well, alot more horse poo if I want to follow any of those procedures, unless I missed some? There is that tek about the styrofoam contraption with some sort of heating element in it... and maybe I had too much coffee in me to hold still long enough to read those instructions properly... but isn't there any easier way?

Someone in chat mentioned just leaching it and letting it bake in the sun...

But that raises a question or two in my mind, as well as a very apparent problem:

What is leaching as it applies to this process? soaking in water? quick rinse and drain? just let it sit on some newspaper?

Do I leave it in a pile or break it up? spread it thick or thin?

And the problem: all of a sudden the sun disappeared, I think right about the time I found the poo. It was sunny and warm all of the last two weeks, wtf? :eusa_eh:

So. The poo sat overnight in the plastic bag, after which I dumped it into the tub pictured below. Using a garden fork, I broke up the road apples, and spread the poo as evenly as I could in the base of the tub (pausing for pictures as needed of course).

Third pic is today, 24 hours and no sun later. On the left you might be able to detect a lighter green where I scraped the surface away, so maybe some drying is occuring after all.

I haven't added anything to it yet. I wanted to bounce some thoughts off ya'll first.

So, traditional methods aren't really going to work here are they? Isn't the heat produced by composting a product of the large mass of material, both in insulation properties as well as biomass? I guess that's where the styrofoam ice chest with some sort of heater in it comes in. It seems from freaky's posts, that if I had maybe 30 more degrees farenheit and some actual sunlight this stuff would crisp right up.

But there's more to getting fire fang than just drying the poo isn't there? I've seen posts that say using fresh poo is fine, so anyway I go with this I guess I'm gonna be ok, but I don't want to just be ok, ok? I want to blow the fuck outa my fruiting chambers. I want to have to buy new fruiting chambers cuz the last ones got torn apart by the giant monster shrooms that burst outa them. And I know that's only gonna happen if I get firefang on my horsey doo.

So first off, how do I go about leaching this stuff? Remember, this is straight up horse shit, no straw and urine from the floor of the barn. From the horses butt to the sparkling clean paved street to me. Should I just pour a quart or two of some water into the current tub, and let it sit for a couple hours, then strain it? is that leaching? or is just letting it continue to sit as is leaching?

Also, I liked the idea of adding yogurt and yeast to the poo and some dirt to give it healthy aerobic bacteria to start things off right. I know I won't need much, maybe a cup of yogurt and a tablespoon of yeast, plus a handful of fresh worm castings from my vermicomposter. So I guess there's no soaking, that will drown any aerobic organisms, unless I put an air stone in with it... ? I'm just gonna sit here and brainstorm until someone interjects with a suggestion..

Ok, so I've thought about this a bit, and I'm thinking that maybe I should grab an old t-shirt, and give the poo a dunk for a couple minutes, then pull it out and give it a squeeze? try that a few times? Then toss in some vermiculite and maybe some coir as well as the yeast, yogurt, and castings? and maybe some kelp and crushed egg shells while i'm at it? I'm itching to get going on this, though I have about a month til I'll be needing any compost.

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#28 golly

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 03:21 PM

It looks a bit too fresh for using right away..You can speed the aging process by Soaking and draining ,then leave it out in the sun for a week..
The composting alternative would require a larger amount for fast breakdown into compost..
Cubes are a primary decomposer, so it's not ness to make compost..

The nuggets are ready when the fibers become tan brownish rather than green brown and the shit smell dissipates ....

#29 Jake420

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 03:53 PM

The following exerpt from Growing Wild Mushrooms by Bob Harris might help you.

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#30 Beast

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 02:38 AM

mixed in:

5 cups cottonseed meal
1 cup plain yogurt
1 cup honey malt
1/8 cup bread yeast
5 cups vermiculite

and about a quart of water, mixed it, and made a small pile.

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#31 golly

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 01:54 PM

Quite a mix there..If you leave it out in the sun with a clear lid on and re-mix it up everyday , then it should cook pretty quick..

#32 Jake420

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 02:32 PM

So are you going to be using the styrofoam container technique or what golly suggested? Let us know how it goes man, good luck.

#33 Beast

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 04:56 PM

Its looking like I'm going with something along the lines of Golly's suggestion. I'm not interested in building a contraption, I guess, not right now at least.

I'm thinking that the pile will still get anaerobic organisms in the center of the pile, and aerobic ones on the outside. Keep flipping it every day, and the populations should be kept in check.

I am considering moving the pile into a smaller container. I am also considering putting the pile into a miniature version of the oscr but with only one top bin. This would maximize ventilation, and allow me to collect and remix any leachate.

Also I'm concerned about UV radiation, I know most soil organisms don't like it, so that's another reason to move the pile into a darker tub.

#34 Jake420

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 08:10 PM

Rotate the middle, bottom and top every other day. Takes about a week to a week and a half, depending on how the final product looks (and smells.)

#35 Beast

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 10:53 PM

Well, I took a pic of the pile about 20 hours later, looks a little darker and drier on the outside. And on the inside there was a definite change in consistency, it became very uniform. Lots of swollen verm in there. Also, lots of flies and a few maggots. :puke:

I spread it all out and gave it a good stir. I think its time to add some gypsum, and a mix of coir, cardboard, and maybe some newspaper. Gonna toss in a cup or so of fresh castings from my vermicomposter and some molasses as well.

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#36 Jake420

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 11:21 PM

Also, lots of flies and a few maggots. :puke:



LMAO! Oh god, need to catch my breath. That just caught me as so funny, don't know why... Whew. Anyway. Um, have you been keeping it all sealed when not tending it so as to keep flies out? Like have it in a tub with some sort of tarp or the like over it? Something that will let it breathe just a bit? If it gets too dry, keep a layer of straw on top and spray the entire thing with a fine misting after each rotation.

#37 Beast

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Posted 12 September 2007 - 02:56 PM

Are you laughin at me?:ballbat: Naw, j/k, I prolly deserve it... I suppose I seem to lack the aversion to insects and poo that post people seem to be held back by. I've even done entomological studies on fecal matter decompostion by tropical insects. Quite fascinating.

But yeah, clouds of flies that have been digging around in poo, on my balcony, right outside my back door (its not that bad, honest) is not the best for neighborly relations.

So I'm doing the following: I'm creating a ventilated tub in tub very similar to the oscr, putting a lid on it, and turning/mixing it every other day.

Today I also mixed in:

half a quart of water that I disolved four tablespoons of molasses and four teaspoons of gypsum in.

And lots of torn up old cardboard box and about a third of a block of coco coir.

I was concerned that placing the poo in a smaller container might compact it too much, and anyways, it seemed like this pile o poo would benefit from the addition of some cellulose. I didn't have time to run off to the feed store to see if I could mooch a couple arm fulls of some straw, and had the cardboard and coir on hand already for the vermicomposter, so what the heck.

I think that's it for supplements, now I just need to let it sit for a couple weeks, turning every other day, or as needed. I'm going to stick to turning every other day at least until next week, at this point.

I must be doing something right, the texture and color of the poo seems to change every day, and there is not a sour ammonia sort of smell coming from it, but more of a sweet aroma. Reminds me of touring a brewery. Also reminds me of sweet livestock feed, must be all those honey malt grains and molasses I put in there. Hope this turns out alright!

Stay tuned kids, same beast time, same beast channel!:headbang:

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#38 Jake420

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 12:47 AM

Awesome. Sounds like you're getting her done. :D Something that occured to me... Instead of straw, you could cover it with wet cardboard to keep the moisture content up (if that is or becomes an issue.) Then after it's all said and done you could even mix the cardboard in with everything like you've already done. Or maybe use the compost enriched cardboard as an isolated test material.

Let me know when you have company over and the topic of your fly farm comes up... I can see it now. "Hey, um... Err, what are you doing there? What's all that about?" "Oh, you know all about maggot farming right? Yeah, it's the new craze." Or maybe something like, "Oh that? Tarantula's mate. Got me an insect fetish now, can't stop. Need more. The more, the merrier." Or how about, "Dude, it's like so totally obvious! Tarantula's man! They like so totally need to eat!"

#39 Beast

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 11:59 AM

When I have company over they are usually very excited to see the status of my vermicomposter and any other projects I have going. My friends give me advice on composting, rather than turn their noses up at it. They like to hear my stories of squatting in the jungle, watching butterflies land on my poo.:hippie:

Anyways, its been about a week since I made that new container. My cat turned or stirred the pile every other day since then, but it doesn't look like he added any water. I also think that there might have been a miscommunication on whether I wanted it completely dumped out and stirred or just stirred in the smaller tub... Interspecies communications are rather difficult when one needs help with specific steps.

So, when I dumped the smaller bin into a larger one today, I noticed that there was only about a dozen fruit flies, and the poo no longer smells like poo. It had a very earthy smell to it, though there still seems to be a bit of a greenish tint to some of the stuff that was on the inside. The dark stuff on top is a bit of coir that I lined the bottom of the small bin with. There's some competitor species in here for sure. I guess that's why the heated container is necessary. I just read that most of the beneficial organisms for composting need temperatures in the 100-130F range.

The poo seemed a little dry, so I added a quart of water, just enough to cause a little gravity inspired drainage into the second bin. I'll give it a few minutes and then pour that back into the top tub.

Well. Things are progressing, or changing, regardless. I might end up dropping the $30 or so on the styrofoam contraption after all. There's been some sun, but it doesn't get above 70 here, so I don't think those thermogenic temperatures are going to be happening anytime soon.

The fact that the pile is changing, and from green to black/brown, is good. The fact that it doesn't have a sour/ammonia/poo type smell, but smells very earthy, is good.

Is the fact that there are maggots and other competitor species present good or bad? They're doing something in there.

I'm still gonna continue with things as is. I get discouraged due to the lack of available info for composting at this scale, probably because it isn't feasible, not if the desired outcome is what is produced by large scale composting. We shall see though, I haven't given up yet.

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#40 golly

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 01:52 PM

Well Beast, even at 70-90F there are plenty organisms working to break things down,
just takes a bit longer..While a raging hot pile will cook much faster - u lose alot of the
mass, as it's vapourized into the atmosphere and the nitrogen goes with it ...

Also the mix doesn't have to be reduced to the same level as is needed for green plants.
Being as everything in the mix has a small partical size - it shouldn't take too long..

The addition of a handfull of old organic garden soil can really speed up the initial colonization of munching Microbes...




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