Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Woodchip Information Thread


  • Please log in to reply
33 replies to this topic

#1 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,571 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 24 September 2007 - 08:27 PM

I made this thread in hopes that it can be a place to get some info regarding using woodchips in the hobby. Please feel free to ask a question or answer one.

I mentioned in another thread that I just bought a garden chipper/shredder. Now that i've tried it a bit (enough to default from exchanging it) I really like it, except for the fact that it does not shred straw the way I had hoped it would... anyhow, i'm making chip s like a madman.

I started out with some long, slender maple and birch branches. The leaves had just changed and most had dropped. The machine chipped them into dime size pieces in a hurry. A pile of branches took under 15 minutes and made two large tubs full of chips.

The plan is to cut myself a nice pile of branches and store them dry. That way all winter I can make chips on demand. The chips will be used for growing oysters, shitake, P.cyans and cyanfriscosa.

The edibles i'll fruit indoors.Except for a few experiments the cyans will be colonized indoors for the winter and then be put out to beds in the spring. I hope to fruit some woodlovers inside on the side.

I have lots of questions about woodchips but I will get this thread rolling by asking a couple...

1. I have lots of maple trees in the yard that have a great many dead branches around the bottom. They grow hundreds to a cluster. Can I use dead hardwood branches that are off the ground (to chip) ???


2. Should I dry the green branches I cut before chipping or is green chips from the fall okay???


Thanks in advance

H

#2 gardentoad

gardentoad

    Mycophiliac

  • Free Member
  • 61 posts

Posted 24 September 2007 - 11:18 PM

I think the lower branches will be fine. When my friend makes chip beds he allows the chips to "age" for a while before he innoculates his beds. He lets them sit for about a month...and he soaks them before using. He says wood lovers are comparatively easy and that his only obstacles are keeping the humidity up and racoons.

#3 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,571 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 25 September 2007 - 08:57 PM

What about dead branches that are still on the tree??

#4 Jake420

Jake420

    The Mycoman

  • Expired Member
  • 313 posts

Posted 25 September 2007 - 09:13 PM

Well, it depends on whether the branches are completely, fuggly dead or just leafless. You want the wood you use to have plenty of nutrients. Fresh during fall or spring is best because of the high sap content in the wood.

#5 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,571 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 27 September 2007 - 06:43 PM

I think what i'm going to do is concentrate on areas with hardwoods growing under powerlines. These trees will be cut regardless and the are usually slender stretching birch and maple.

I need to go out and cut and stack as much as I can and store it under a tarp or under the carport. This way i can chip on demand all winter.

I plan on growing oysters and shitake in bags on woodchips, so it would be nice to produce chips as I need them.

In the spring (already looking ahead !) I plan on making lots of chips and spreading them around in various zones and micro-climates.

Had a question...

For indoor colonization , after chips are well myc'd and you add more fresh chips... should those new chips be pasturized for species like oysters and cyans?

I have been pasturizing for indoor growth and just soaking for adding to established outdoor beds.

Just wondering if the pasturizing helps stave off trich indoors?

thanks

H

#6 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 27 September 2007 - 06:48 PM

to do the straw right
you gotta run it thru the shredder
3-4 times, once won't get it.

#7 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,571 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 27 September 2007 - 06:59 PM

Main reason i'm using woodchips is because my yard is full of maples , but i'm far from farm courty.

I do use straw for cubies and will continue to have a bale or 2 on hand, I'm getting a second shredder that shreds leaves and straw. I'd have done better with getting both machines in one, but it did'nt work out that way.

Thanks for the advice

H

#8 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 27 September 2007 - 07:10 PM

i just went ahead and got a leaf vac/mulcher for the straw, much faster
but still gotta run it thru a few times

#9 waylitjim

waylitjim

    A Mirror Image

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 4,706 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 27 September 2007 - 08:09 PM

For indoor colonization , after chips are well myc'd and you add more fresh chips... should those new chips be pasturized for species like oysters and cyans?


Indoor it's best to pasteurize the chips, they tend to get moldy otherwise. The second best option is soaking the chips in bleach water over night. 1.25 Tbsp per gallon ofwater.

#10 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,571 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 27 September 2007 - 09:45 PM

Thanks

I enjoy pasteurizing anyhow. I have a very large canning pot that holds enough water that I can fill a 5 gallon bucket with water that is about 175 degrees.I put a lid on the bucket. Then I heat up another pot of water to 160.

I add both to a large plastic tote and by the time the second batch is ready the first has cooled down to 160. Then I add my material and pasteurize for one hour.

I even got a hot-plate so I can pasteurize outside... thus making the female unit happy!

cheers

H

#11 HUMBLE STUDENT

HUMBLE STUDENT

    Keeper Of The Spores

  • Expired Member
  • 728 posts

Posted 13 November 2007 - 02:50 PM

Does the wood chip method work with cubes? and can i make like a cake out of it or should this method be used more for a bulk substrate?

#12 waylitjim

waylitjim

    A Mirror Image

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 4,706 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 November 2007 - 04:04 PM

You don't want to use wood chips for cubensis.
Use grains to fruit or spawn to a bulk substrate such as manure or straw.

#13 wenresep

wenresep

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 2 posts

Posted 13 January 2008 - 12:26 PM

Hiya

This is my first post here after some years of enjoying the material on this forum. :headbang:

I have a question on sawdust; I see on the net that oak is supposedly the best log to use for shitake, is this still true for spawn bag dust logs?

I mean do the supplements fix all that stuff or will oak dust pretty much still be the shait when it comes to Shitake or Reishi cultivation?

Is the differance really that bad?

Thanx

#14 golly

golly

    modapotato

  • Expired Member
  • 6,205 posts

Posted 13 January 2008 - 02:15 PM

Welcome to the forum Wen...!
Oak is generally a harder wood and colo's more slowly than most others but the dust and smaller chips should still easily colonize for indoor culture..
Good to have a mixed texture or partical size and be generous with the spawn..
If all the wood is dust sized , u could mix in some chunky verm instead...

#15 eatyualive

eatyualive

    ExoCannibalist

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 6,153 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 January 2008 - 03:01 PM

long needed thread!:eusa_clap

#16 bugs

bugs

    Are we having fun yet?

  • OG VIP
  • 3,260 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 January 2008 - 03:46 PM

long needed thread!:eusa_clap

Amen.
What's the consensus on aspen pet bedding for making ps. cyan/azure spawn? I had pretty good luck on it with oysters. Started on wbs then noc'd logs of aspen. I think I stirred in some oak sawdust too but can't remember for sure.

#17 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,571 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 13 January 2008 - 04:09 PM

Interesting turdbit of information ... king trumpet oyster can be grown on fir, hemlock and spruce chips/stumps/logs. Most other species of cultivated mushrooms wouldn't do well by these mediums.

#18 waylitjim

waylitjim

    A Mirror Image

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 4,706 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 January 2008 - 04:18 PM

What's the consensus on aspen pet bedding for making ps. cyan/azure spawn?


From my experience, Aspen pet bedding didn't colonize very well. Aspen is a hardwood deciduous tree, so it should support woodloving fungi. I just didn't have much luck with it. I prefer beech, hickory and alder.

#19 hyphaenation

hyphaenation

    Former Staff

  • Honorary Former Staff
  • 13,571 posts

Donator


Awards Bar:

Posted 13 January 2008 - 04:34 PM

Here's a question thats been on my mind. Is it necessary (or better ) to dry/season branches that you are about to chip? Being mid-winter here I can cut many hardwood branches for chipping , maple , alder & birch, but I don't have space to dry the braches out indoors.

Also is it okay to chip small branches of trees like maple, birch , alder etc ? Is "young" wood inferior to mature wood chips? I ask because I have the ability to chip small branches only.

#20 bugs

bugs

    Are we having fun yet?

  • OG VIP
  • 3,260 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 13 January 2008 - 07:11 PM

Aspen is a hardwood deciduous tree, so it should support woodloving fungi.


Yeah, I had thought it would be OK since it's hardwood and not all that different from alder.

Guess I'd better check yellow pages for arborists. Maybe they'll have some alder chips piled out back. Last fall all I could find was mixed hard and soft woods, no idea the ratio or types in any single pile.




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!