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Steeping Wild Bird Seed: Achieving proper moisture content


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#21 fahtster

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 12:57 PM

nice thread, eatu. :thumbup: This might be a nice little addition to it since I see that you are using metal ring bands with tyvek...

prepare your lid band by flipping the band over and taking a pliers and flattening that ridge on the inside of the band... this ridge, if not flattened, will cut into your tyvek if you screw the band on too tight...

Posted Image


you might not have any troubles with it since your lid bands look pretty nice, but maybe some peeps are using the cheaper shittier ones. :)

fahtster

#22 eatyualive

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 11:02 PM

no i was using the shitty lids for years. but they recently rusted. so now i bought these titanum pieces of shit that rusted after the first pc. its underneath the band that rusted. where it touches the tvyek. no water would get under that with the foil on tight. i mean particles yes but not a substantial amount. crappy product!


anyway, aside from the vent about these shitty lids, i injected this 1 hour soak wbs grain with clone material todady. so i put it to the test immediately.

#23 eatyualive

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 11:03 PM

..double post sorry. actually faht, ive never screwed the lids on too tight. i have a good tightness but nothing tough to remove. and ive never had it stick to the tyvek. in fact, the way i do the lids. when i remove the foil and band and tyvek together it makes one lid and is easy to remove like its one lid. so generally i just use that. if i inject i just inject through the tyvek and then add tape over that. ive also read that you can put a coffee filter over the tyvek in place of the foil. then inject through both the tyvek and filter then just twist the coffee filter 180 degress. i thought that was quite witty!

jet-dri is a
Surfactant-
a wetting agents that lower the surface tension of a liquid, allowing easier spreading, and lower the interfacial tension between two liquids.

--good info hip! it definitely helps get the goo off the grain...

#24 Lazlo

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:28 AM

I don't like waiting for a day for seed to soak either. I just lightly cover the seed with hot tap water and wait for it to blow up. Usually after an hour it's ready.

#25 TVCasualty

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:38 AM

Regular dishsoap (like Dawn, for example) works great for rinsing too, so you don't really need to go out and buy a bottle of Jet Dry just for this, though it can be nice to have one on hand.

I had seen, I believe it was TVCasualty using hydrated lime to hydrate WBS as well


I don't add lime to a substrate, but I do add chalk since it helps buffer pH. Chalk is hard to come by where I am, at least it's hard to find cheap chalk, but I got more than I can use in several years by taking a 25 pound bag of hydrated lime, opening it, and letting it sit for a year (I should add that it wasn't wide open; I'd used some then rolled the top of the bag down and put it in the shed outside). I forgot about that particular bag, and later read about lime 'degrading' into calcium carbonate over time if exposed to air/humidity. it works, since half a cup of year-old lime did not appreciably change the pH of a single liter of water! Normally, one tablespoon would make the pH skyrocket. I add it at a ratio of about half a cup of old lime per 12 jars, give or take. When trying this, be sure to add a little more water to compensate. Casing layers love the chalk buffer as well...


A gram of gypsum per quart jar is good too, and helps make the grain much easier to break up when shaking.

#26 fedshtkpndrk

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 11:04 AM

thanks for the reply TV:thumbup:, I have been using a teaspoon of hydrated lime when I steep the WBS in a large pot for 15 min. Seems to help with cleaning as well. I give the WBS a good rinse before going into the jars:)

-feds

#27 eatyualive

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 11:20 AM

Regular dishsoap (like Dawn, for example) works great for rinsing too, so you don't really need to go out and buy a bottle of Jet Dry just for this, though it can be nice to have one on hand.



I don't add lime to a substrate, but I do add chalk since it helps buffer pH. Chalk is hard to come by where I am, at least it's hard to find cheap chalk, but I got more than I can use in several years by taking a 25 pound bag of hydrated lime, opening it, and letting it sit for a year (I should add that it wasn't wide open; I'd used some then rolled the top of the bag down and put it in the shed outside). I forgot about that particular bag, and later read about lime 'degrading' into calcium carbonate over time if exposed to air/humidity. it works, since half a cup of year-old lime did not appreciably change the pH of a single liter of water! Normally, one tablespoon would make the pH skyrocket. I add it at a ratio of about half a cup of old lime per 12 jars, give or take. When trying this, be sure to add a little more water to compensate. Casing layers love the chalk buffer as well...


A gram of gypsum per quart jar is good too, and helps make the grain much easier to break up when shaking.


good info tv. i have had that jet dry for about 4 years now...lol...so really until it runs out in 2 more years. i won't need anymore but good to know dish soap works as well.




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