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CK's Beer of the Month


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#1 candykid420

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 04:16 PM

So I get asked frequently about beer; whether it is what beer I'm drinking at the moment, what are some good imports, or where I buy it, etc.

I decided I should make a Beer of the Month thread, in which I will disclose to you, my fellow Mycomaniacs, the current brew I'm sipping on. As most of you know, I order ALOT of imported beer (2 cases a week to be exact) and many of these brews are not well-known, but can be easily obtained. So without further ado...


April Beer of the Month:

Paulaner Hefe Weiss Wheat Beer
Imported From: Germany
Price: $2.79 for 16oz


This beer comes straight from the breweries of Paulaner, located in a remote region of Munich, Germany, somewhere in the mountains. It is imported by a company in the White Plains area of New York (where most of our imports come from). Here is a brief history of the company:

Brewed in Munich, Germany, Paulaner is known worldwide for its quality. The Paulaner monks brewed the first Paulaner beer in 1627. During the Lenten period forced to fast on only bread and water, the monks reasoned that beer could be brewed as "liquid bread" and not violate their Lenten promise. The Paulaner monks' "liquid bread" became the world's first Double Bock - Paulaner Salvator. Those were some enterprising monks who changed brewing history forever.

And a little history about the beer itself:

Paulaner Hefe-Weizen is the company's flagship style and brings the friendly, relaxed atmosphere of Munich's beer gardens to America. It is a classic Bavarian wheat beer. "Hefe" in German translates to yeast and "Weizen" (pronounced Vi-Zen) translates to wheat. Yeast retained in the beer is responsible for the cloudy appearance of Paulaner Hefe-Weizen. A centrifuge process is used with traditional wheat beers to retain the yeast instead of the typical filtering process used with beers that are clear in appearance. Paulaner Hefe-Weizen contains 60% malted wheat and 40% malted barley.

Wheat beer was originated in the German state of Bavaria in the 15th century. In Bavaria today wheat beers represent almost 20% of the beer category and Paulaner is one of the fastest growing at an average rate of nearly 10% per year since 1995.* While the wheat beer segment in the U.S. is much smaller, the style is gaining more attention. The reason why isn't too hard to figure out – wheat beers offer an extremely refreshing taste. Paulaner Hefe-Weizen is refreshment made for relaxing with friends any time of the year.


I hope you guys enjoyed this installment of Beer of the Month, and check back next month for more! Now get back to drinking, yous bastids!

~CK

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#2 Beast

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 04:40 PM

Great info, CK! I've always enjoyed hefeweisens, probably my favorite type of beer.

It might be urban legend or whatever, but it's my understanding that the extra yeast/wheat in the beer adds something to your system that minimizes hangovers. I've been falldown drunk on some hefeweisen before and no hangover the next day...

#3 nerve

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 04:57 PM

Had that shit on tap last night
Loved it!

#4 candykid420

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 03:37 PM

Great info, CK! I've always enjoyed hefeweisens, probably my favorite type of beer.

It might be urban legend or whatever, but it's my understanding that the extra yeast/wheat in the beer adds something to your system that minimizes hangovers. I've been falldown drunk on some hefeweisen before and no hangover the next day...



I have heard this as well, and do believe it to be true. I can drink these suckers a-plenty and wake up feeling a little groggy, but not hung-over

#5 Raptor

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Posted 21 April 2005 - 11:40 AM

interesting, how would you compare it to michelob's version of hefeweisen, although i'm assuming there is no comparision :) Don't believe I care for that bitter taste as much as others.

#6 candykid420

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Posted 22 April 2005 - 03:52 PM

^^^

I prefer Paulander's over Michelob any day....to me, Michelob is a joke. When I think of the way their beer tastes (including their version of Hef.) and the packaging itself, I imagine middle-aged men playing golf in those goofy pants, drinking Michelob in their carts. I just can't get past the taste, it's not that good. Definetely seek out a Paulander if you can, I promise you it's worth it.

#7 nerve

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Posted 22 April 2005 - 06:25 PM

I promise you it's worth it.


It really is. Very good beer.

#8 Sweetness

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Posted 23 April 2005 - 03:37 AM

The other night I tasted Imperial. Its the national beer of Costa Rica. Crisp with hardly any after taste. Its a light colored beer, well carbonated with a smooth hint of hops. Heard it compared to the German beer, Bitburger. My friends drink Imperial on their surf trips down to CR and were surprised to see it hit the shelves up here. Its not in the grocery or liquor stores yet. But a local mini mart carries a good variety of imports and is usually 1st in the area to bring in new stuff.

#9 candykid420

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Posted 23 April 2005 - 11:54 AM

^^^

Suprisingly, I haven't tried Imperial...I'll defenitely have to pick some up though, thanks for the write-up :)


(you can move this to Lifestyles, if it hasn't already been moved)

#10 Hippie3

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Posted 23 April 2005 - 12:08 PM

done.
do you brew yer own beer too ?

#11 Raptor

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Posted 23 April 2005 - 05:33 PM

middle-aged men playing golf haha that's funny.

obviously if you leave all obvious conceptions about american macro-swill at the door, michelob is better than most other mass-popular beers. In particular amberboch or honey lager.

#12 candykid420

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 11:30 AM

done.
do you brew yer own beer too ?



Yes, as a matter of fact - it's a family tradition of sorts. My father has been brewing his own beer since his Grandfather taught him, and he has passed the tradition down to myself. Although his brews always have a honey after-taste, mine are pretty good, too. I just can't seem to perfect it...even after years of trying, I can't seem to master the taste I'm looking for. I've studied Hollan'ds traditions of brewing, and I'm trying to concoct something along those lines, but so far all I have is a Budweiser-like brew. I do not like the aftertaste of it...reminds me of eating band-aids. One day I'll get it down just right, and perhaps then I'll try to start a business...that has always been a dream of mine :) Until then I just give it out to friends for feedback.

It's all about the hops, man


and Raptor - I can agree that Michelob does indeed taste better than most other domestics....but then again, that's not saying much :)

#13 dead_diver

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 11:44 AM

I like any beer that is bottle fermented. A layer of yeast on the bottom is a good thing :)

#14 dead_diver

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 11:49 AM

I used to drink a lot of Polar beer. It was 15 cents for a 20oz bottle. Tasted like Polar bear piss but it was all we could get. Now my neighborhood exotic beer convenience store sells it for some insane price. It taste awful but it sells. LOL

#15 dead_diver

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 11:51 AM

I'm a home brewer too. I stick to Ales. Easier to work with than Lagers and more forgiving of mistakes.

#16 dead_diver

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 12:02 PM

One last thought. A good quality beer will taste good cold or warm. Many beers are prefered served at room temp to get the full flavor. Cold numbs the taste buds and hides cheap beers nasty flavor.

#17 Raptor

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 04:25 PM

polar bear piss mmm.. has anyone had King Cobra? haha

#18 candykid420

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 06:04 PM

One last thought. A good quality beer will taste good cold or warm. Many beers are prefered served at room temp to get the full flavor. Cold numbs the taste buds and hides cheap beers nasty flavor.



Agree'd.


About brewing Ale:

I began brewing Ale originally, and never developed much of a taste for it. While I can enjoy a Bass or McTarnahan's, Ale is just not my cup of tea...now when it comes to creating a Lager, I'm all for it. Those seem to be where the gold lay; getting a Lager to taste "good" is a very hard thing to master. It's very easy to end up with something that tastes like piss, rather than honey-dew.

#19 Raptor

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 10:24 AM

Not that Michelob needs to be mentioned anymore, but has anyone seen/had the seasonal sampler packs the have around winter? Anybody had the Marzen in the blue label?

#20 candykid420

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 11:28 AM

^^^

I actually prefer those over their other products, which makes me wonder why they are seasonal, lol.

I was actually tempted to try the Michelob energy drink while I was in the grocery store last night, but I ended up buying Killian's instead (I love red beer)




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