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all my psilocybe zapotecorun pictures


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#21 cactu

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 02:58 PM

more for viewing pleasure

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#22 Workman

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 03:06 PM

HI Workman,
after I get back to bangkok this spring, I still have three new species for you to work on.

mjshroomer



Holy Crap! Good thing I ordered a case of cover slips.

#23 Guest_cleanjar_*

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 07:38 PM

well, wonderful work mr cactu, those are truly brilliant looking mushrooms, of superior reasoning

good work for mjshroomer and workman also of course

Cleanjar

#24 the_chosen_one

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 08:06 PM

Posted Image
WOW!
:heart:

#25 cactu

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Posted 24 December 2007 - 11:17 AM

i hope you could see the 86 mushrooms that are in the last picture that the chosen one put so kind, when i was back home i was cleaning the mushrooms and was looking how massive the cluster where , so i proceed to count then , i found that some have 24,36,48 ,56, and the most big the one in the last picture i proceed to pull all mushroom in display and take pitures , but i did not realise that the camera was out of memory until next day, but i wish i could have made a video of it , i guess pictures are not so instructive, well i hope that nature give me the opportunity to see this againg or even break the record of 86 mushrooms in a single cluster, if i don´t see that again i was happy to be there, yesterday i experiment with my dry samples, and was happy to reafirmate the potency
i ate one single big specimen and was into level 3 russhing 4 , this if what you get with a dry sample i calculate the mushrooms weight and was 1 gr. , i guees fresh could be superior potency. all my best vibrations.

#26 Hippie3

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Posted 24 December 2007 - 11:32 AM

very nice cluster wow
:kewl:

#27 the_chosen_one

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Posted 24 December 2007 - 12:21 PM

cactu, i am so glad you are sharing this with us :hugs:

thank you! :heart:

#28 cactu

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Posted 24 December 2007 - 12:41 PM

all this picture where with a cell fone too bad i know. but will get better in time .

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#29 prankster239

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Posted 24 December 2007 - 01:09 PM

HA! Well I am working on it. You people need to stop finding new species.


:eusa_shhh

#30 cactu

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Posted 24 December 2007 - 06:40 PM

:eusa_pray i pray to the spirits

:lol: i laugf with the spirits

:meditate: with the spirits i fly, with out then i sink .....

merry christmas every one .
and my best vibrations

#31 Godflesh

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 06:24 PM

Hey Cactu, Leme know when your package arrives egh?:loveeyes:

#32 hobolicious

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 03:58 AM

Awesome pictures cactu - Mexican psilocybes are my favorite. Is this the mushroom known as Teonanacatl, or does that refer to many mushrooms? I get conflicting reports, and I'm no expert. If it's not beyond my ability to grow, my hand is open if you're willing to throw.

#33 Nightwind

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 05:06 AM

Nice work...

Lord Xochipilli has shown you much.
and though you to us as well,

Thanks :eusa_clap

#34 mjshroomer

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 06:59 AM

Is this the mushroom known as Teonanacatl, or does that refer to many mushrooms?


Guzmán (1990:98), noted authority on the entheogenic mushrooms of Mesoamerica wrote that "according to Wasson, nine Indian tribes in México use sacred mushrooms or did in the past. Five of these--the Mazatec, Mixtec, Mixe, Chatino and Zapotec indians--are located in the state of Oaxaca. Four others dwell elsewhere; [one tribe] the Nahuatl [are found], from the center of México to the Pacific in Colima and Chiapas and to the Gulf of México in Veracruz. Of these, the Mazahuan, Otomi and Tarascan indians apparently no longer use the sacred mushrooms, having abandoned them at some point in their forgotten past."

"Eruption of the earth", "mushroom of reason", "children of the water", "our masters, the mushrooms of the world", "the most holy of lords", "little ones that spring forth", "mushrooms of the saints", and "los señor (the lords, used by Mesoamericans)", are but a few of the many endearing epithets used to describe the adoration, respect, and esteem many Mesoamericans hold when expressing their love for the sacred mushrooms. The ancient Nahua adorned the sacred mushrooms like beautiful flowers and their cultural importance has been significantly immortalized as well as botanically depicted along with other sacred plants on an ancient statue known as "Xochipilli" (the "prince of flowers).

The Nahuatl mushroom names discussed in this study originally appeared in several codices and journals written by the early Spanish historians, botanists, and friars during the 16th and 17th century, all who undoubtedly wrote under the dictation of the strict hierarchy and guidance of the Holy Office of the Inquisition. References of the sacred mushrooms were recorded in the diaries, journals and codices of the Franciscan Monk Bernardino de Sahagún (1956), the Dominican Friar Diego Durán (1867 [1581]), Francisco Hernandez (1651), Coto (1983), Jacinto de la Serna (1892), Kingsbourough (1842), and Fray Toribo de Benavente [Motolina] (1858).

These Nahua mushroom names and epithets first gained recognition within a small segment of the scientific community due to the scholarly research and published papers of Schultes (1939, 1940), Wasson & Wasson (1957), Wasson (1957), Hoogshagen (1959), Singer and Smith (1958), and Guzmán (1983).

The Spanish chronicler Sahagún was the first historian to note that the Aztec people consumed certain mushrooms which caused inebriations. In the Nahuatl language these mushrooms were known as Teonanácatl ("flesh of the gods"). Sahagún also wrote that these mushrooms were commonly consumed during ritualistic ceremonies performed by Aztec priests and their followers. The most common scholarly accepted name applied to the sacred mushrooms appears to be the word Teonanácatl which several historians (especially Sahagún) mentioned in their historical works.

Noted ethnomycologist R. Gordon Wasson (1974, see Fig. 1), reported that Molina had referred to the sacred mushrooms as xochinanácatl. Xochi is the nahuatl word for flower and nanácatl implies mushrooms. The words teonanácatl and nanacátl were names Sahagún used when describing several species of entheogenic mushrooms which were indigenous to the New World (Sahagún, 1956). Nanácatl is also the nahuatl word for meat and is used primarily by Mexican Indians to describe entheogenic mushrooms as well as their edible and poisonous cousins.

[FONT="] Wasson (1981) suggested that Teonanácatl could also be interpreted as "sacred mushroom", "wondrous mushroom", or even "divine meat." According to Guzmán (1990:96), "after Wasson called attention to the word teonanácatl it was used indiscriminately to describe any of the Mexican hallucinogenic mushroom [species]. But Sahagún applied it only to those mushrooms used by the nahuatl tribe. It no longer has currency; at any rate, neither Reko, Weitlaner, Schultes nor Wasson found [or uncovered any evidence that the word] teonanácatl [was currently] being used by modern Indians.

[/FONT][FONT="]The Nahuatl word teonanácatl was not meant or used by the ancient Aztec to describe any one single species of mushroom as Schultes (1939, 1940) first suggested, but most likely referred to several varieties of mushrooms.

[/FONT][FONT="]Current research indicates that native healers living in remote mountain villages in Mesoamerica do not refer to any of the sacred mushrooms as teonanácatl. [/FONT]
24. Psilocybe zapotecorum Heim. (Fig. 12).
Known in Mazatec as:
reje or reji (implies where other mushrooms grow).
piule de Garda (narcotic of Christ's Crown of Thorns).
di-nizé taa-ya.
honguito adivinador (little divine mushroom).
hongo de la razón (mushroom of reasoning).
nche-je.

Known in Zapotec as:
badao zoo.
badoo.
[FONT="]bei.
[/FONT] be-meeche.
beya-zoo.
beyo-zoo.
bi-neechi.
bi-niichi
corona de cristo (crown of thorns).
derrumbes (landslide mushroom).
derrumbe de agua (landslide in the water).
derrumbes negro (black landslide).
mbey-sant (saint mushroom).
mbey san (mushroom of the saints).
patao-zoo.
paya-zoo.
pea-cho.
pe-neeche.
pea-zoo.
pi-neeche.
pi-nijchi.
pi-nij-chi.
piule de barda (mushroom of the Christ crow of spines).
piule de churis.
razón-bei (mushroom of reason).
razón-guiol.
razón mbey, razón-mbei (mushroom of reason).
razón viejo.
zoo-patao.

Known in Chatino as:
cui-ya-jo-o-tno (great sacred mushroom).
cui-ya-jo-to-ki (little sacred mushroom).

[FONT="]P[/FONT][FONT="]. zapotecorum is a popular species employed ceremoniously by Mazatec and Zapotec shamans. They occur in marshy grounds in the Sierra Costera region. [/FONT]

Excerpt is from:
ETHNOMYCOLOGICAL JOURNALS SACRED MUSHROOM STUDIES VOLUME III
TEONANÁCATL: Ancient and Contemporary Shamanic Mushroom Names
of Mesoamerica and other Regions of the World

by




John W. Allen

Originally published by Psilly Publications and RaverBooks, 1997.

Copyright by John W. Allen, 1997-2008.

mjshroomer

#35 dial8

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 12:14 PM

P. caerulescens was first discovered in south Alabama, right? Do you know much about this find? Was the mycologist actively looking for new species or was she looking for known species and happened to stumble upon this one? Or, did she hear about an unamed mushroom from Mexico and on a hunch went looking for it in Al in similar habitats?

Anthropologist Jim Jacobs showed me a photo of P. zapotecorum he extracted from a landslide area which was 13 inches in length.

Certain species like the P. caerulescens (landslide mushroom) growing onorads along sugard cane mulch are semi man-made environment. Usually inthe wild they are scarce and scattered, but some of the Mexican species grow abundantly in the wild, but you still have to walk form shroom patch to patch. could be one or two shrooms or 100 or a thousand.

Not to get away from the P. zapotecorum, here are two images of P. caerulescens from Oaxaca near the late Sabio, Maria Sabina's home.

This should give you an idea of abundance.

Also, one image of Wasson and Rolf Singer with a smaller collection of P. caerulescens from a different trip.

mjshroomer



#36 dial8

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 12:23 PM

Btw, cactu, incredible pictures! Simply stunning! One quick question. Did you have a guide or are you familiar with this area? I know it took a while to find these (3 years of actively looking). Why do think that is? Is this species just really rare or do you think the numbers have been dwindling over the years. I mean it seems they are very abundant in the right habitat.

#37 little white rabbit

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 12:38 PM

wow, great finds :bow:

#38 hobolicious

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 03:43 PM

mjshroomer, thanks for the info.

#39 mjshroomer

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 06:43 PM

P. caerulescens was first discovered in south Alabama, right? Do you know much about this find? Was the mycologist actively looking for new species or was she looking for known species and happened to stumble upon this one? Or, did she hear about an unamed mushroom from Mexico and on a hunch went looking for it in Al in similar habitats?


Psilocybe caerulescens was discovered by Murrill in Huntsville, Alabama in 1924.

Almost thirty years before French Mycologist Roger Heim recorded the presence of P. caerulescens in Oaxaca between 1954-1957.

It has not been found in Alabama since nut has been collected in Mississippi, Alabama and Florida with many specimens deposited in herbariums in Mexico.

Murrrill was just out on a foray and was also collecting many other mushrooms for study and herbarium deposit

And Murrill is a man, not a woman as you quoted above when you refferred to her two i times in a single sentence as a she.

Here is Murrill's short biography. His record is quite impressive.

Archives and Manuscript Collections

Records of the Herbarium (RG4)
WILLIAM ALPHONSO MURRILL RECORDS (1903-1957)
2.6 linear feet (4 boxes)

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

William Alphonso Murrill (1869-1957) was a mycologist, taxonomist, writer, and authority on the fleshy fungi (Basidiomycetes). Born October 13, 1869, near Lynchburg, Virginia, he gained a B.S. degree (1887) from the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College; B.S. (1889), B.A. (1890), and M.A. (1891) degrees from Randolph Macon College; and a Ph.D. (1897) from Cornell University. He taught biology for four years at DeWitt Clinton High School in New York City and in 1904 began his career with The New York Botanical Garden as Assistant Curator, succeeding Franklin S. Earle as staff mycologist. From 1909 to 1919 he acted as Assistant Director and became Curator and Supervisor of Public Instruction from 1919 to 1924.

Murrill collected over 70,000 specimens of fungi in North and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean, of which The New York Botanical Garden Cryptogamic Herbarium holds about 14,000 specimens, including more than 1,700 type specimens. Using the American Code of nomenclature Murrill identified and described many new genera and species and made nomenclatural revisions of existing taxa that were variously criticized and praised by American mycologists. On at least four occasions, Murrill traveled to England, France, Italy, Germany, and Sweden to study type specimens in European herbaria. He identified the pathogenic fungus Diaporthe [Cryphonectria] parasitica that causes Chestnut blight.

Murrill published important monographs on hymenomycetes, and over five hundred scientific articles on a wide range of botanical subjects. His major works include a series on the Polyporaceae in the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club (1902-06), and five monographs on the Boletaceae and Polyporaceae in 1914-15. He lectured widely and wrote autobiographical pieces and popular books on natural science for young adults. Murrill founded and served as editor of Mycologia (1909-1924) and the Journal of the NYBG (1906-1908), and was a contributor to North American Flora. In 1924 he retired both from the Garden and from professional life altogether. During the 1930's he became associated with the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he resumed mycological study and publication until his death in 1957.


mjshroomer

#40 dial8

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 09:36 AM

Hey thanks, mj. I knew it was in Al but I did not know it was that far north. There are conflicting reports. I've read Montgomery and Mobile.
Hmmm must of been something I read somewhere that made me think he was a she. Dont know why. Anyway thanks again.

Its only reasonable to assume the species is still around the southern states just very rare and hard to find.




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