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fungus mites ID pic


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#1 nrthlndr27

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 11:50 PM

I had 2 cased trays that ended up getting these little suckers in them. I think my straw/poo substrate was a bit under pasteurized in these trays. I live in a cold climate so everything outside has been frozen for months now. This tray developed a few fruits, but I don't think the other did at all before I saw these little critters and pitched it. They were like crawling over everything in the tray. I have other trays that are pinning and fruiting fairly nicely and have looked fairly closely and haven't seen any of these things. The things are tiny (the fruit was maybe pinkie size max). You can barely make them out with the naked eye. Thank god for macro lenses on cameras... I have a few more photos if this one doesn't provide enough detail.

Main questions:

What the hell are they?
What's the best way to kill them?
How do I prevent future outbreaks?

I guess once someone can ID these it would probably answer a lot of my other questions. Thanks, your site rocks. The collection of knowledge here is unbelievable!

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  • Mushroom Mites1resize.jpg


#2 Workman

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 12:30 AM

Fungus mites. I am very familiar with these little bastards. Unfortunately you need to get rid of everything and then bug bomb. They suck the life out of the mycelium and some species feed on molds that they then spread. Small numbers do little damage but they reproduce rapidly and can then cause real problems. Your picture is a great example for others to reference.

#3 greenweanie

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 12:32 AM

how do u get them? how do u keep them at bay once removed? any more info on them?

#4 Workman

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 12:52 AM

They come in from outside soil and debris. The straw may have been the culprit in this case. Just stay clean. Usually, even if they are around you still get 2 or 3 good flushes before you even notice them. My problems with mites were most apparent when I kept cycling trays into a fruiting chamber without doing a full break down and cleaning. Regular full cleaning eliminates or reduces the problem to acceptable levels.

Stamets' "The Mushroom Cultivator" has a page on them.

#5 greenweanie

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 01:02 AM

thanks workman!!

#6 Foster

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 01:19 AM

Wow! Great Pic!:bow: Very interesting. Hey Workman, are these the mature specimens?

#7 Workman

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 01:30 AM

Yep, thats as big as they get.

#8 nrthlndr27

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 01:36 AM

What is their main mechanism of transportation? I didn't notice any airborne little nasties in the air. Do they have a life cycle involving flight? The mites were primarily concentrated in two trays. Also, since I've got some trays that are colonizing nicely and just starting to pin and thus at least a week from harvest - would a light sprinkling of permethrin (.25%) garden and pet dust keep these little fungus suckers at bay?

The container I have states:

  • Kills aphids, beetles, caterpillars & other insects as listed.
  • Use on home garden fruits, vegetables, roses & ornamental plants.
  • Controls fleas, ticks, and lice on dogs.
Depending on the vegetable in question, the label advises it may be applied up to one day before harvest.

I'm not into eating a bunch of pesticides, but the thought of the alternative protein added to my harvest is not the most appealing thing either...very bad visuals...

#9 Dank Side Of The Shroom

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 01:40 AM

sux u got mites but that is a very kewl pic, hope u get all them lil fuckers. :rasta:

#10 ShroomGuerilla

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 01:45 AM

that picture scares me:dead:

#11 TVCasualty

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 08:52 AM

That really is a great pic of those things, though I'm sorry to hear they showed up at your place!

archive material to contamination & pests/bugs

#12 aliendave

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 09:23 AM

i'm not big into chemical suppression, but the garden product "sevin" has been used in sensitive situations to get rid of mite infestations in exotic animals. it is granular, and a small amount is placed into a shallow dish and positioned in the room where the infestation is present. usually the mites are wiped out within 2-3 days. i have used this product many times with reptiles and household pets. someone may want to take a closer look at the overall implications, but it seems to be fairly safe, and is not applied directly to the substrate, or the fruits. as soon as the work is done i usually remove the sevin.

CARBARYL - OG

seven should not come into contact with skin, and a good read @ this link will give you the worst case scenerios - all involve inhalation of dust and repeated dermal overexposure.

a direct application of diatomaceous earth can sometimes be very affective also. especially if you want to rid harvested fruits; it is non-reactive and safe to consume.

#13 Hippie3

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 09:41 AM

pyrethrin aerosols safer

#14 Lazlo

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:07 AM

Yikes! Nice picture at least.

#15 Birdman

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:24 AM

pyrethrin aerosols safer


This will not effect a edible mushroom like oysters?
I don't have a mite problem but fog with pyrenone 50
for the birds once a month.The only different ingreient
is piperonly butoxide at 5%.It it supposed to be safe
for meat production use also.Safe for egg producers even
from what the lable says.

#16 Hippie3

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:43 AM

they say it's safe for edibles
but myself i would still rinse well
and use in-between flushes,
think i'd pass on directly hitting the shrooms i plan for dinner

#17 Birdman

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:56 AM

they say it's safe for edibles
but myself i would still rinse well
and use in-between flushes,
think i'd pass on directly hitting the shrooms i plan for dinner

Thanks Hippie3
I only fog once a month for prevention of infestation.
All seed has moth eggs even stuff with orange oil.
This one day foging keeps every thing at bay and
does not hurt the birds.I will just do it when there
are no fruits.Glad to here it wont hurt the mycelium.

#18 Hippie3

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:00 AM

just set at a distance where small droplets do not land directly on live tissue,
i've seen leaf damage when i set off too close to plants.

#19 camMyco

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:35 AM

A Picture for the archives/glossary?

Attached Thumbnails

  • Mushroom%20Mites1resize.jpg


#20 dial8

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 12:09 PM

I was about to suggest the same thing. Archive Material > contaminants and parasites.




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