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ID request - Southern California


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#1 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:58 PM

Subbedhunter420 found these in southern California. They were growing near a colony of Pluteus cervinus, but I don't know if these were growing directly from wood.
I would be very pleased if someone could help identify them.
subbed1.jpg
subbed2.jpg
subbed3.jpg

Here are some pics of the spores, 1000x.
They are slightly rough (minutely ornamented) with a conspicuous hilar appendage
IMG_6449.jpg
IMG_6450.jpg

Pleurocystidia, 400x, crush mount:
IMG_6453.jpg
IMG_6454.jpg
IMG_6455.jpg
IMG_6456.jpg

Cheilocystidia, 100x, strange tree-like thing:
IMG_6458.jpg

Cheilocystidia, 400x:
IMG_6459.jpg
IMG_6457.jpg

Basidium 400x:
IMG_6460.jpg

The dried cap has one part that is a little bit blue. Its a light blue, almost sky blue. The place where it is blue is damaged, but I can't tell if it is just blue or it turns blue when damaged. There were some black spots as well.
When I rehydrated the cap with 70% isopropanol I noticed a pretty strong radish odor.

Edited by MrChen, 11 February 2011 - 02:09 PM.
uploaded pictures and embedded thumbnails


#2 Sasquatch

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 03:24 PM

i was watching a confrence where paul stamets was speaking and im sure he said that rusty brown spores are not a good thing

#3 Guest_cleanjar_*

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 11:34 PM

try scraping some of the blue discoloration onto a slide to see what it looks like

#4 mjshroomer

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 03:19 PM

Hi ALan,

I sent your description of the mushrooms posted above and your photos to my colleague in Switzerland and this is what he had to say.

Dear John,


As for the mushroom you sent me, the description is poor, and the pictures could also be improved. It would have been of help to know whether it was growing on the same wooden tronc as Pluteus cervinus. There's a fair chance that it could be Pluteus salicinus, because advanced specimens can really have a bluegreen pileus. Raphanoid odor is also pointing in that direction. Alternatively, P. cyanopus Rea would be a candidate, but this customer is so rare that I cannot even find a good picture of it on the WEB.

It may interest you that there's a new issue N° 48, Dec. 2007, of Le Bulletin de l'Association Entrevalaise de Mycologie et de Botanique Appliquée. All papers are in French. Gianluca Toro has produced a wordy article on Boletus manicus that does not bring much news. Benjamin Thomas writes about Ps. kumaenorum . Our editor in chief, Lucien Giacomoni is good for a serious view on Le < Barcoding>, un test génétique applicable aux champignons.

Yours Truly contributed a study on radiocesium in edible mushrooms from various origin. The data were gathered 6 years after the Tchernobyl disaster.

If you are interested in any of these papers, just tell me and I'll provide.
Have a nice week, and take care.

Tjakko


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#5 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 05:07 PM

As for the mushroom you sent me, the description is poor, and the pictures could also be improved. It would have been of help to know whether it was growing on the same wooden tronc as Pluteus cervinus. There's a fair chance that it could be Pluteus salicinus, because advanced specimens can really have a bluegreen Pileus . Raphanoid odor is also pointing in that direction. Alternatively, P. cyanopus Rea would be a candidate, but this customer is so rare that I cannot even find a good picture of it on the WEB.



There is no way this sample could be a Pluteus, that genus is known for free gills and the gill attachment on this mushroom is not even close to free.

Also, Pluteus always has smooth spores, never ornamented as these are.

Pluteus also typically has much closer gills, the spacing in this sample is much wider.

In addition, the spore print color is wrong, Pluteus always has at least a tinge of pink, never just brown.

#6 Lazlo

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 11:38 AM

Alan take a look at Cortinarius oregonensis. I've tried to find photos for comparison, but came up sort of empty. None that great anyways.

#7 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 09:20 PM

I took a look at the pileipellis today, it consists of a thin layer of interwoven hyphae:

100x:
IMG_6538.jpg

400x:
IMG_6539.jpg

Edited by MrChen, 11 February 2011 - 02:02 PM.
uploaded pictures and embedded thumbnails


#8 Alan Rockefeller

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 03:43 AM

I had a feeling that Tjakko Stijve wasn't serious about his Pluteus ID, so I asked him. Here is his reply:


Hi Alan,

I must apologize. When I received John Allen's message, I could not open
the pictures, and I was in a hurry, because of having to meet a
deadline. So I did not pay proper attention, and suggested some blueing
Pluteus sp. WRONG!
Your photos show indeed a mushroom closely resembling a Hebeloma, a
darned difficult genus.
I spend the better part of this early morning in going through keys
provided by authors as RICKEN, K?hner & Romagnesi, Courtecuisse, Horak,
and Breitenbach & Kr?nzlin, but nobody comes even close to a species
exhibiting this discrete sky blue color. I also looked under
Phlegmacium, but in vain.
I am sorry I cannot do better. I have consulted some befriended
mycologists. If anything comes up, I' ll inform you.

Best regards,

Tjakko Stijve






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