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Outdoor substrates?


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#1 Cafro

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 03:56 PM

are woodchips a suitable casing layer for outdoor beds of cubensis mycilia?

if so are the woodchips soaked in water to hydrate
before being used? or simply used right out
of the bag.

also, could somone please reccomend a "type" of woodchip

peace

#2 Togaebi

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 04:02 PM

I'm a newbie here, so please correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems that woodchips might be too nutritious to use as a casing layer. 50/50 peat/verm with some lime to balance pH seems to be popular for terrariums, but I'm not sure about outdoor growing.

Good Luck!
~Togaebi

#3 Guest_dial8_*

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 04:27 PM

Don't use wood chips for cubes. Although they can colonize and utilize wood to an extent it is not the best for cubes. You can go the peat/verm route or you can simply lay straw on top of them to a depth of about an inch or so. I would cut the straw up into 1-3 inch peices, soak it, drain it, and apply. No need to pc the straw for an outdoor bed.

#4 Cafro

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 04:38 PM

what would you think of just using cardboard
as a bottom layer? instead of crumbled cakes or grains.

would this colonize the straw efficiently?
i have heard some negative comments
and some positive comments
concerning the topic.

thanks for the quick reply dial8:headbang:

#5 Guest_dial8_*

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 04:41 PM

Depending on the depth of your substrate one layer on the bootom may not suffice but if you had multiple layers or you could cut the colonized cardboard up and thoroughly mix it with your straw.
Now we are talking about cubensis and not a wood loving species, right?

#6 Cafro

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 04:49 PM

yes, cubensis species. from what i hear,
i would be able to spawn way more cubensis during warm months.

i would consider other species but the cold months in my area are few, and the warm months are more common. i dont think the cold cyans would do well for me,, but i am in a mixed weather climate, winters are short and cold, and summers are warm. i read somewhere that cyans we're difficult to fruit, so this scared me off. what would you reccomend?

#7 Cafro

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 05:09 PM

i havnt started my cardboard yet,
waiting on cakes to pin,but i can definitly make enough
for cutting pieces and mixing through the straw.
this sounds better than my original idea
of an all cardboard bottom layer.

i want to use tissue for my cardboard, so i gotta wait:bow:
but i have a huge mass of cut up boxes saved and ready to go

#8 Guest_dial8_*

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 05:19 PM

Yeah, I would use the cakes as spawn and forget about the cardboard unless you plan on cloning with it after you harvest some fruit. Just mix the cakes thoroughly witht the straw.
If you are spawning cakes to straw I would pasteurize the straw. Although this is not necessary for outdoor beds I think it softens the straw some making it easier to colonize.
Above I thought you were wanting a suggestion for a casing layer. What you are wanting is a substrate material, and straw works great.
Straw can be used as a quazi/pseudo casing layer outdoors.

Clariffication: Casing layer is a non nutritious layer that simply supplies water for the developing fruit bodies.
Substrate is the medium that the mycelium colonizes and uses for food.

#9 Guest_dial8_*

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 05:27 PM

Here is a link to a tek. http://mycotopia.net...s/5/132876.html

#10 strangegem23

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 11:44 AM

In regards to growing azures and cyanescens, how important is it that the woodchips are "fresh". (How about green, is that a problem?) Does draining the woodchips after soaking them leach out nutrients, and if so, is this a problem? Will they grow on hardwood mulch, or should the bed be mostly woodchips? A mixture?

#11 golly

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 12:28 PM

Both fresh and older solid wood Chips are colo'd by the Myc..Older chips should be pasteurized to eliminate compeditor fungi n' bugs...
HW Mulch can make up 20-30% of the mix ..Best to have a matrix of different sizes ..The larger chips provide a nessessary long lasting food source to carry the patch through the next season..
I'm sure some sugars are leached with the drain water from fresh chips but
shouldn't be a significant problemo...

#12 strangegem23

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 12:58 PM

Cool, thats helpfull. Thanks Golly!

What about incorporating some leaf litter into the matrix?

#13 Guest_Stroph_*

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 04:06 PM

I'm going to be starting some Azurescens and Caerulipes so I went to my local, over priced, grocery store in search of woodchips. The only woodchips they had were Apple and Birch. Will either of these work? Also, do I just soak the chips or is there some kind of sterilization/pasteurization process that is needed?

#14 golly

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 04:57 PM

They should work, although never tried myself..

Best to heat the chips by bringing a large pot with chips n' water to boiling point then turn off heat and let sit untill the chips sink [fully hydrated]...

#15 Guest_Stroph_*

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 05:17 PM

Awesome! Thank you, Golly. I ended up getting the birch. More expensive, but I just heard someone saying the were using birch. What's the normal soak time until they sink? 48 hours?

#16 golly

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 06:12 PM

Depends on chip size and original moist content ..Mine take about 3hours but yours could take a day...I've heard of peeps using birch..try to have mixed sizes together...Even a bit of coir in the mix is good as it's 30% lignin i think..

#17 Guest_Stroph_*

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 06:37 PM

They are all different sizes. The size ranges from 1cm to 2in. All about 1-2cm thick. Are you saying I should add about 30% coir?

#18 the_other_chap

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 08:57 PM

Once they're started, I think they'll go for practically any type of wood.

I've had good colonisation in my outdoor bed but no fruiting as yet (it was started too late last year).

The bed is made from a bag of "forest chips" I found at my local nursery centre which seems to be mixed hardwood & softwood chippings and about 30% bark bits.

I need to move the bed in a month or two, and I had a small experimental probe in the bed and everything seems to be covered in nice thick white mycelium :D

I'll be moving (and expanding it) shortly, and if I remember I'll take pix and post them.

#19 Guest_Stroph_*

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 09:46 PM

Excellent, Chap. That's what I want to do; an outside bed. I live in an apartment building, so it's kinda tough. Just the other day, I was chatting with my landlord and told him how much I like to garden. He told me "Feel free to put in whatever plants/flowers you want to as long as you take care of them." One side of the building is always shaded, so I think I'll start there. ;)

#20 HipsterDoofus

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Posted 02 April 2007 - 11:16 PM

Alder is the ideal woodchip. Any hardwood will be fine. Cardboard's good, too.

Avoid the resinous woods like pine.




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