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You Have An Endocannabinoid System- Cannabis Revelations


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#41 hyphaenation

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 04:41 AM

From the endocannabinoid thread. Good info.

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Edited by hyphaenation, 02 January 2014 - 09:38 PM.


#42 hyphaenation

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 01:00 PM

Enhanced Sweet Taste: This is Your Tongue on Cannabis


http://www.monell.or...ndocannabinoids

Endocannabinoid modulation of tongue sweet taste receptors may help control feeding behavior

PHILADELPHIA (December 21, 2009) — New findings from the Monell Center and Kyushu University in Japan report that endocannabinoids act directly on taste receptors on the tongue to enhance sweet taste.

“Our taste cells may be more involved in regulating our appetites than we had previously known,” said study author Robert Margolskee, M.D., Ph.D., a Monell molecular biologist. “Better understanding of the driving forces for eating and overeating could lead to interventions to stem the burgeoning rise in obesity and related diseases.”

Endocannabinoids are substances similar to THC, the active ingredient in marijuana. Produced in the brain and body, they bind with cannabinoid receptors to help regulate appetite and many other processes involved in health and disease.

“Endocannabinoids both act in the brain to increase appetite and also modulate taste receptors on the tongue to increase the response to sweets,” said study senior author Yuzo Ninomiya, Ph.D., Professor of Oral Neuroscience in the Graduate School of Dental Sciences at Kyushu University in Japan.

In the study, published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers conducted a series of experiments in mice to determine the behavioral, neural and cellular responses to sweet taste stimuli before and after the administration of endocannabinoids.

Sweet taste responses were enhanced by endocannabinoids in every case. The effect was specific for sweet taste, as endocannibinoids had no effect on responses to sour, salty, bitter or umami taste stimuli.

The effects were abolished when the experiments were repeated using knockout mice lacking the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Additional studies revealed that the CB1 receptor and the T1R3 sweet taste receptor are present in the same taste cells.

Together, the experiments demonstrate that endocannabinoids selectively enhance sweet taste by acting on tongue taste cells and that the effect is mediated by the endocannabinoid receptor.

“Modulation of sweet taste responses may be an important component of the endocannabinoid system’s role in regulating feeding behavior,” said Margolskee. He parenthetically noted that the well-known “marijuana munchies” may depend at least in part on endocannabinoid stimulation of tongue taste cells.

Sweet taste receptors also are found in the intestine and pancreas, where they help regulate nutrient absorption, insulin secretion and energy metabolism. If endocannibinoids also modulate the responses of pancreatic and intestinal sweet receptors, the findings may open doors to the development of novel therapeutic compounds to combat metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

Also contributing to the study were Ryusuke Yoshida, Tadahiro Ohkuri, Masafumi Jyotaki, Toshiaki Yasuo, Nao Horio, Keiko Yasumatsu, Keisuke Sanematsu, Noriatsu Shigemura, Yuzo Ninomiya from Kyushu University and Tsuneyuki Yamamoto from Nagasaki International University.

The research was funded by grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health.

PDF version
http://www.monell.or...Taste_final.pdf
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#43 lysergic

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 01:46 PM

Enhanced Sweet Taste: This is Your Tongue on Cannabis


http://www.monell.or...ndocannabinoids

Endocannabinoid modulation of tongue sweet taste receptors may help control feeding behavior

PHILADELPHIA (December 21, 2009) — New findings from the Monell Center and Kyushu University in Japan report that endocannabinoids act directly on taste receptors on the tongue to enhance sweet taste.

“Our taste cells may be more involved in regulating our appetites than we had previously known,” said study author Robert Margolskee, M.D., Ph.D., a Monell molecular biologist. “Better understanding of the driving forces for eating and overeating could lead to interventions to stem the burgeoning rise in obesity and related diseases.”

Endocannabinoids are substances similar to THC, the active ingredient in marijuana. Produced in the brain and body, they bind with cannabinoid receptors to help regulate appetite and many other processes involved in health and disease.

“Endocannabinoids both act in the brain to increase appetite and also modulate taste receptors on the tongue to increase the response to sweets,” said study senior author Yuzo Ninomiya, Ph.D., Professor of Oral Neuroscience in the Graduate School of Dental Sciences at Kyushu University in Japan.

In the study, published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers conducted a series of experiments in mice to determine the behavioral, neural and cellular responses to sweet taste stimuli before and after the administration of endocannabinoids.

Sweet taste responses were enhanced by endocannabinoids in every case. The effect was specific for sweet taste, as endocannibinoids had no effect on responses to sour, salty, bitter or umami taste stimuli.

The effects were abolished when the experiments were repeated using knockout mice lacking the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Additional studies revealed that the CB1 receptor and the T1R3 sweet taste receptor are present in the same taste cells.

Together, the experiments demonstrate that endocannabinoids selectively enhance sweet taste by acting on tongue taste cells and that the effect is mediated by the endocannabinoid receptor.

“Modulation of sweet taste responses may be an important component of the endocannabinoid system’s role in regulating feeding behavior,” said Margolskee. He parenthetically noted that the well-known “marijuana munchies” may depend at least in part on endocannabinoid stimulation of tongue taste cells.

Sweet taste receptors also are found in the intestine and pancreas, where they help regulate nutrient absorption, insulin secretion and energy metabolism. If endocannibinoids also modulate the responses of pancreatic and intestinal sweet receptors, the findings may open doors to the development of novel therapeutic compounds to combat metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

Also contributing to the study were Ryusuke Yoshida, Tadahiro Ohkuri, Masafumi Jyotaki, Toshiaki Yasuo, Nao Horio, Keiko Yasumatsu, Keisuke Sanematsu, Noriatsu Shigemura, Yuzo Ninomiya from Kyushu University and Tsuneyuki Yamamoto from Nagasaki International University.

The research was funded by grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health.

PDF version
http://www.monell.or...Taste_final.pdf



That is super interesting!
Thanks for the article :bow:

#44 hyphaenation

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 01:56 AM

Pot Slows Cancer in Test Tube

Marijuana Ingredients Slow Invasion by Cervical and Lung Cancer Cells

http://www.webmd.com...er-in-test-tube

By Daniel J. DeNoon

WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Dec. 26, 2007 -- THC and another marijuana-derived compound slow the spread of cervical and lung cancers, test-tube studies suggest.
The new findings add to the fast-growing number of animal and cell-culture studies showing different anticancer effects for cannabinoids, chemical compounds derived from marijuana.

Cannabinoids, and sometimes marijuana itself, are currently used to lessen the nausea and pain experienced by many cancer patients. The new findings -- yet to be proven in human studies -- suggest that cannabinoids may have a direct anticancer effect.

"Cannabinoids' ... potential therapeutic benefit in the treatment of highly invasive cancers should be addressed in clinical trials," conclude Robert Ramer, PhD, and Burkhard Hinz, PhD, of the University of Rostock, Germany.

Might cannabinoids keep dangerous tumors from spreading throughout the body? Ramer and Hinz set up an experiment in which invasive cervical and lung cancer cells had make their way through a tissue-like gel. Even at very low concentrations, the marijuana compounds THC and methanandamide (MA) significantly slowed the invading cancer cells.
Doses of THC that reduce pain in cancer patients yield blood concentrations much higher then the concentrations needed to inhibit cancer invasion.

"Thus the effects of THC on cell invasion occurred at therapeutically relevant concentrations," Ramer and Hinz note.
The researchers are quick to point out that much more study is needed to find out whether these test-tube results apply to tumor growth in animals and in humans.
Ramer and Hinz report the findings in the Jan. 2, 2008 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

#45 hyphaenation

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 01:05 AM

Cannabis spray reduces cancer pain

http://www.google.co...60N9r67bqbS4JDw
(UKPA) – Dec 14, 2009
Cancer patients who used a cannabis mouthspray had their pain levels reduced by 30%, researchers have said.
The cannabis-based spray, like a mouth freshener, was used on 177 patients by researchers from Edinburgh University.
They found that it reduced pain levels by 30% in a group of cancer patients, all in the Edinburgh area, who had not been helped by morphine or other medicines.
The spray was developed so that it did not affect the mental state of patients in the way that using cannabis would.
The researchers said their findings, reported in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, did not justify smoking cannabis as this could increase the risk of cancer.
They said the spray works by activating molecules in the body called cannabinoid receptors which can stop nerve signals being sent to the brain from the site of pain.
Edinburgh University's Professor Marie Fallon said: "These early results are very promising and demonstrate that cannabis-based medicines may deliver effective treatment for people with severe pain.
"Prescription of these drugs can be very useful in combating debilitating pain, but it is important to understand the difference between their medical and recreational use."


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Scottish Study Concludes: Cannabis Spray Can Reduce Cancer Pain by 30%



http://www.blatantne...ancer_pain.html

A research study by Edinburgh University has found that patients felt a 30% reduction in pain, when on no other pain-relieving medications, from a specially made cannabis spray. Over the past couple of decades, it has become increasingly noticeable that many people have begun to use cannabis for pain relief, particularly those suffering from cancer and multiple sclerosis, but this breakthrough in this particular method of administering the plants pain-relieving properties, will possibly give some non-smokers an extra avenue to consider when attempting to relieve their own suffering. And this new method will atleast appease those who condemn smoking cannabis, saying the cancer risk of smoking far outweighs the pain relief gained.


THE EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY CANNABIS STUDY


In total, 177 cancer patients were tested in the Edinburgh area as part of this study, by the University of Edinburgh Cancer Research Centre (ECRC), and researchers found that there was an overall 30% reduction in pain for these cancer patients. They were given the cannabis in the form of a mouth spray, which is designed much like a mouth-freshening spray, and all of those tested were given no other pain relief drugs. According to the University of Edinburgh... "Researchers say the spray works by activating molecules in the body called cannabinoid receptors. When triggered by cannabis, these receptors can stop nerve signals being transmitted from the site of pain to the brain".


NO, IT WON'T MAKE YOU PSYCHOTIC

The University of Edinburgh also add that... "The medical spray has been developed so that it does not affect the mental state of the patient, in the way normally associated with cannabis consumption", which is presumably down to which actual parts of the cannabis plant are used in the spray, so that could be another big worry out of the way. And this is important to those who want to include it as part of their treatments for certain long-term or terminal conditions. I know a handful of people, from all backgrounds, who have used cannabis to relieve pain associated with multiple sclerosis, and who have all given glowing references as to it's pain relieving properties. They say that it relaxes their muscles, which leads to less spasms, and therefore, less pain. Alternatively I know others who have tried it have found that it gave no relief whatsoever, so maybe this treatment only suits some people, some people's bodies, or some conditions. But all of them would portray worries relating to what smoking cannabis might be doing to their minds and emotions. So, if this spray does what the University of Edinburgh claims, then it is a major breakthrough. The research data from the Edinburgh trials is being published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.


----------------


Make your own Cannamist sprayer !

http://mycotopia.net...structions.html
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#46 hyphaenation

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 04:40 PM

http://www.personall...sease-19524630/

Chemicals Found In Cannabis May Aid The Treatment Of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

December 31, 2009 by Personal Liberty News Desk

Compounds found in cannabis may be useful as part of an effective treatment for certain inflammatory bowel diseases, a new study has found.

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, two of the more prevalent bowel diseases, are caused by genetic and environmental factors such as diet, stress and bacterial imbalance.

Researchers found that two cannabis compounds—THC and cannabidol—can play an important role in normal bowel function as well as the immune system’s inflammatory response.

"The body produces its own cannabinoid molecules, called endocannabinoids, which we have shown increase the permeability of the epithelium during inflammation, implying that overproduction may be detrimental," said Karen Wright, author of the study.

"However, we were able to reverse this process using plant-derived cannabinoids, which appeared to allow the epithelial cells to form tighter bonds with each other and restore the membrane barrier," she added.
While THC is responsible for the "high" associated with using cannabis, cannabidol, which is also effective in restoring membrane integrity, does not have any psychoactive properties.

Meanwhile, independent research has indicated that cannabis may also be helpful in controlling symptoms associated with glaucoma and certain forms of cancer.

-----------------------


Chemicals in cannabis 'could be used to treat crippling stomach conditions'


http://www.independe...ns-1979550.html



By Kate Devlin

Thursday December 17 2009

Chemicals found in cannabis could be used to treat crippling stomach conditions, scientists believe.

They hope that some day drugs could be developed from the plant to treat diseases like Crohn’s and Colitis, which affect around 250,000 people in Britain.

Sufferers of the conditions have problems with the linings of the intestines.

Laboratory tests show that two compounds found in cannabis appear to help protect the lining by fighting off cells which attack it.

One of the chemicals involved is responsible for the “high” that people get when they smoke cannabis, scientists said.

The research was carried out by Dr Karen Wright, from Lancaster University, who will present her findings at the winter meeting of the British Pharmacological Society.

#47 hyphaenation

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 04:43 PM


Natural Pot-Like Compound Could Fight Obesity

http://www.scientifi...&sc=DD_20091229

A study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that endocannabinoids, compounds naturally found in the body related to pot's active ingredient, could inform the effort to control appetite. Cynthia Graber reports


Could there be a substance that both gives us the munchies and can help combat obesity? There may indeed be, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


The Monell Center in Pennsylvania partnered with Kyushu University in Japan to study compounds called endocannabinoids. These occur naturally in our body and are similar to THC, the compound primarily responsible for marijuana’s psychoactive effects.


Researchers studied endocannabinoids in mice, and they say that the chemicals have a one-two punch—in your brain, they increase your appetite. And on your tongue, they enhance the response to sweet flavors. The compounds had no effect on salty, sour, bitter or umami tasting.
It turns out that sweetness receptors are present in the same cells as cannabinoid receptors on our tongues. But how could such an effect contribute to combating obesity? According to the scientists, there are similar sweet receptors in hormone-producing cells in the intestine and pancreas. There, they affect metabolism and the absorption of nutrients. Scientists say that if endocannabinoids also act on those receptors it could lead to new compounds to moderate metabolism. Which might stop the development of the pot belly.






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#48 captainpicard420

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 05:33 PM

http://news.ucsf.edu...ted-neuropathy/

Smoked cannabis reduces pain caused by HIV-associated neuropathy

In a randomized placebo-controlled trial, patients smoking cannabis experienced a 34 percent reduction in intense foot pain associated with HIV-twice the rate experienced by patients who smoked placebo.
“This placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that people with HIV who smoked cannabis had substantially greater pain reduction than those who did not smoke the cannabis,” said study lead author Donald I. Abrams, MD, UCSF professor of clinical medicine. “These results provide evidence that there is a measurable medical benefit to smoking cannabis for these patients.”

The study, published in the February 13 issue of the journal “Neurology,” looked at 50 HIV patients with HIV-associated sensory neuropathy, a painful and often debilitating condition that is the most common peripheral nerve disorder that occurs as a complication of HIV infection. Occurring usually in the feet and characterized at times by tingling, numbness, the sensation of pins and needles, burning, and sharp intense pain, severe peripheral neuropathy can make walking or standing difficult.
Patients participating in the study were randomized into two equal groups-one assigned to smoke cannabis and the other assigned to smoke identical placebo cigarettes with the cannabinoids extracted. The patients smoked the study cigarettes three times a day for five days under supervision as inpatients in the General Clinical Research Center at San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center.
“Even though antiretroviral treatments have reduced the prevalence and severity of many HIV-related neurological complications, neuropathy continues to affect up to one of every three patients,” said co-author Cheryl A. Jay, MD, UCSF professor of clinical neurology. “There are no FDA-approved treatments for HIV-related neuropathy. This study suggests new avenues to manage neuropathic pain in this setting.”
The study also incorporated a pain model developed at UCSF that provided a standardized reference point. This model allowed researchers to compare relief of chronic HIV-associated neuropathic pain simultaneously with patient response to pain and skin sensitivity induced by heating and capsaicin application.
“The beauty of this study is the use of the pain model as a neutral and physiological anchor for pain measurement. Patients’ eyes were averted during the measurements and were uninfluenced by expectations. Smoked cannabis was shown to work on the pain system by shrinking the area of painfully sensitive skin created by the model. The response was comparable to strong pain relievers we have studied, such as morphine,” said co-author, Karin L. Petersen, MD, UCSF assistant adjunct professor of neurology.
This study is the first completed of several clinical trials of medicinal cannabis being conducted under the auspices of the University of California’s Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research.
“It has been many years since clinical trials with cannabis have been conducted in the United States,” said Igor Grant, MD, professor of psychiatry at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and director of the CMCR. “As a result there has been insufficient light shed on the possible therapeutic value of cannabis. The results of this first study indicate that cannabis may indeed be useful in the amelioration of a very distressing, disabling, and difficult to treat complication of HIV. We look forward to the results of several additional CMCR studies nearing completion to continue clarifying cannabis’ possible role as a therapeutic agent.”
Co-authors include Starley B. Shade, MPH; Hector Vizoso, RN; and Mary Ellen Kelly, MPH, from the UCSF Positive Health Program at San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center, and Michael C. Rowbotham, MD; Haatem Reda, BA; and Scott Press, BS, from the UCSF Pain Clinical Research Center.

#49 Dipole

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 11:35 PM

Heading - The S Word
A science news blog from Heading - NewScientist
January 15, 2010 3:25 PM
Sacked scientist promises impartial drugs advice
Andy Coghlan, reporter

The scientist sacked by the British government for allegedly criticizing government drugs policy today made good on his promise to set up his own committee to investigate and publicize the science of recreational drugs.

"We will provide the truth about drugs unfettered by any political interference," said David Nutt of Imperial College London, and the former head of the government's Advisory Committee on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) until he was asked to leave last October by Home Office minister, Alan Johnson.

Now, true to his promise, Nutt is chairman of his newly created Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs, and today proudly announced that its first meeting took place yesterday.

So far it has 14 members, including four of the five who resigned from the ACMD last October in protest at the sacking of Nutt.
"This is the strongest grouping of scientists we've ever had in this country [who are experts on recreational drugs]," said Nutt. "The best science will come from us."

Already, the new committee has decided on its first three programmes.

The first will investigate the dangers of "legal highs"; recreational substances that are not outlawed but which may be causing serious harm to users who buy them freely on the internet.

They include substances such as mephadrone, described by committee member Les King, an adviser to the government on new psychoactive substances, as a cross between amphetamines, Ecstasy and cocaine. "People assume they're safe, but we don't know," says King.

Next up will be a re-assessment of the relative harms of different recreational drugs, both legal and illegal.

Nutt is particularly keen to highlight what he describes as "aberrations" in the current UK government classification of certain drugs, with relatively safe ones such as Ecstasy and cannabis ranked as unjustifiably dangerous and relatively dangerous ones such as alcohol not classified at all.

"At some point, we will put together an assessment of drug harms which will challenge some of the aberrations," says Nutt.

The third project will focus on ketamine, also known as "special K", a drug that is rising in recreational usage. Val Curran of University College London, who will head the study, says that ketamine is already "showing a clear profile of addiction".

In heavy users, it is also causing such serious bladder damage that some have had to have their bladders surgically removed. Two users died drowning in the bath, she says.

The birth of the new committee does raise some interesting questions. First: can it be trusted to be truly impartial? Does it represent a true consensus, and where does it get its funding from?

Equally, where does it leave the ACMD? Some founder members of the new committee are also on the ACMD.

Nutt did turn slightly prickly when asked by a reporter whether his committee would admit "dissident" scientists whose views clash with those prevailing among the founder members. Some scientists, for example, say there's evidence that Ecstasy and cannabis are more dangerous than portrayed by Nutt and other scientists.

In response, Nutt said that, "if the science is good enough, there should be no reason why people shouldn't join us".

And who is funding it all? Not the head of a Colombian drugs cartel, we hope. It turns out to be a wealthy benefactor, Toby Jackson, who is a hedge-fund manager.

"He wants policy driven by scientific evidence," says Nutt. Nutt says that funding is assured for at least three years, costing around £150,000 per year, but the hope is that other sources of funding and public donations will swell the kitty and consolidate the committee.

Another possible source of money could be projects commissioned by the government.

And where does it leave the ACMD? Nutt says that the new chairman, Les Iversen of the University of Oxford, has already sent Nutt his best wishes for the new committee, expressing the hope they can "work together".

But the arrival of the new committee is clearly and deliberately a middle-finger salute to a government seen by Nutt and others as unwilling to grant true independence to its scientific advisers.

Stung by the criticism that advisers could be hired and fired on the whims of ministers, the science minister Lord Drayson last month issued new principles setting out the ground rules for ensuring independence of advice.

But Nutt today described these as "so watered-down" that they made the situation worse than before he was sacked.

The big worry now, of course, is that the public can never again be sure when the ACMD - or any other of its independent scientific advisory committees - is being leant on to produce advice in keeping with government policy. "The ACMD is now working in conditions that fetter them even more," says Nutt.

More broadly, the creation of the committee could set up a whole new paradigm for providing scientific advice without the burden of political interference. Why stop at recreational drugs? Why don't top scientists set up committees to give the unshackled "truth" on climate change, abortion, evolution, nutrition, food and health, nuclear power and so on.

The difficulty, of course, is that such groups could turn out to be self-selecting, choosing among their number only those who are "on-message". But that may be the lesser of two evils compared with government interference.

"It's a very interesting model, with bottom-up scientists coming together to give politically-free independent advice," says Nutt.

#50 hyphaenation

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 03:45 AM

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Are Linked to Longevity

http://online.wsj.co...'s_Most_Popular
By THOMAS M. BURTON

Omega-3 fatty acids, from fish like salmon and other sources, have for years been shown to help lower levels of heart disease and cardiac death.
New research suggests the fatty acids may possess an even more fundamental benefit: Heart patients with high omega-3 intake had relatively longer "telomeres," which are stretches of DNA whose length correlates with longevity.
Cardiologists from the University of California, San Francisco, and other hospitals measured telomere length over five years in 608 patients who had coronary-artery blockage and previous heart attacks. Researchers found that people with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their white blood cells experienced significantly less shortening of telomeres over five years, as compared with patients with lower omega-3 levels.
"What we're demonstrating is a potentially new link between omega-3 fatty acids and the aging process," said Ramin Farzaneh-Far, a clinical cardiologist and assistant medical professor at UCSF and San Francisco General Hospital who is the lead author of the research.
Published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association, the study focused only on "marine" omega-3 found in fish, not the type found in vegetable sources like flaxseed, walnuts, canola oil or soybean oil.
The study didn't distinguish between meals of fatty fish and fish-oil supplements—leaving open the question of whether it's better for people to eat more fish, to eat plants such as flaxseed or just to take omega-3 supplements.
The American Heart Association, in a 2002 scientific statement in the journal Circulation, concluded that consuming omega-3 fatty acids in fish or supplements "significantly reduces subsequent cardiac and all-cause mortality." The fish most often cited are salmon, herring and sardines.
John LaPuma, a Santa Barbara, Calif., physician and nutrition expert, says, "The best data are in fish rather than supplements, but the data for supplements are better than they were five years ago."
There is "very little good evidence for the omega-3s from flax and walnuts," said Dr. LaPuma, author of "ChefMD's Big Book of Culinary Medicine." But these foods have other benefits, he said. For instance, "flax meal, by itself, is an important part of lowering LDL," or bad cholesterol, Dr. LaPuma said.
Researchers in the new study said they observed "baseline levels of marine omega-3 fatty acids were associated with decelerated telomere attrition over 5 years."
Additionally, Dr. Farzaneh-Far said, "in multiple studies, short telomere length [in white blood cells] has been shown to predict death and cardiovascular events and heart failure." He cautioned that "it's an open question as to whether telomere length is causal or just a marker" of cell death. But he referred to telomere shortening as "a key part of cellular aging."
"To definitively address the question of whether omega-3 fatty acids inhibit cellular aging, a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial would be necessary," the authors wrote. Dr. Farzaneh-Far suggested that such research should be done in healthy adults because the evidence already is powerful on behalf of advantages of these fatty acids in heart patients.


-----


-Cannabis- / Hemp seed oil is an excellent source of Omega 3 and 6

http://www.ratical.c...TherapHoil.html

http://www.regenerat...ntent.asp?id=64

http://nutiva.com/gr...hempandflax.pdf
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#51 hyphaenation

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 03:53 AM

FLP vs BLP


[Direct Link]


Edited by hyphaenation, 02 January 2014 - 09:38 PM.

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#52 hyphaenation

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 03:54 AM

-Cannabis-: Necessary for the Survival of Mankind?


Edited by hyphaenation, 02 January 2014 - 09:45 PM.

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#53 hyphaenation

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 04:38 AM

Holistic Biochemistry of Cannabinoids, by Robert Melamede, PhD (Complete)

http://video.google....ient=firefox-a#

Edited by hyphaenation, 02 January 2014 - 09:39 PM.


#54 hyphaenation

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 04:43 AM

Cancer Cure -Cannabis- & Cannabinoids,by Robert Melamede,PhD

 

[Direct Link]


 


Edited by hyphaenation, 02 January 2014 - 10:18 PM.


#55 hyphaenation

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 05:01 AM

Dr. Bob

Cannabis-Receptors

 

[Direct Link]



 


Edited by hyphaenation, 02 January 2014 - 10:19 PM.


#56 hyphaenation

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 05:05 AM

Bump.

I accidentally posted here , when I meant to post in the Cannabuzz thread. Hit save and it wa to late.

Pardon me ... this stuff is very important though , please give it a review.

#57 Jaspmf

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 10:25 AM

helluvalot of good info here.
thanks hyph
:heart:

#58 hyphaenation

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 06:46 PM

Dr. Bob speech from Seattle Hempfest.

Endocannabinoids in human species:

Podcasts part 1 , 2 & 3

http://www.drugtruth...robert_melamede

#59 sagiboy

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 07:36 PM

bookmarked. :thumbup:

#60 hyphaenation

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 07:44 PM

We are Cannabis !

It's a lot to take in but once you make it through the lectures & videos a couple times your almost up to date with some fascinating science.

Edited by hyphaenation, 27 January 2010 - 02:12 AM.





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