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Are they any wild active mushrooms in tennessee


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#1 dragonstud725

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 07:35 AM

Hey Guys I have a FOAF that lives between middle and east Tennessee. And ways wondering if they are any magic mushrooms growing wild around here that would have hallucinogenic substances in them. Like cubies or pans etc. something that would be fun to hunt. If you guys hear of any active mushroom in tennesse please let me know they would be so fun to hunt.
Thanks again dragonstud

#2 TVCasualty

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 09:12 AM

I've heard rumors of cubensis being found in some of the valley pastures, but nothing more than rumors. I think cubensis is moving North, just like everything else seems to be doing. I do know from experience that (outdoor) cultivated cubensis patches will grow and fruit beautifully in that region throughout the warm months.

I'd seed pastures with spores, then come back the following year.

#3 Subbalteatus

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 02:52 PM

I allways wondered if a guy could get a bunch of spore syringes of Copelandia Cyanescens and cubensis and go around injecting manure piles : )

Maybe bringing some manure clumps home would be better and put em in your back yard. Then inject em. I've heard people say this is impossible but hey it sounds like fun to try.

It seems that if you watered them every day that wouldnt be good but some moisture once to twice a week for three to four weeks then a good dumping (sprinkler all day) might have some results.

Just a thought if you cant find any in tennessee maybe you could bring em there : )

#4 dragonstud725

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 08:18 AM

Thanks guys and TV I think you are right I have been in cow field last couple of years and have never found anything. My uncles are allways telling storys about back in the 60s about how you could walk out in just about any cow field and walk out with a 10 gall bucket full. But a out door grow may be in order. Thanks again

#5 TVCasualty

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 08:50 AM

I allways wondered if a guy could get a bunch of spore syringes of Copelandia Cyanescens and cubensis and go around injecting manure piles : )


You could do an indoor grow, and gather a bunch of caps and make spore prints all over a dark pair of pants (so the prints won't show). Then wear those pants while you walk all over the pasture you want to seed. That's extreme low-tech, low-effort, but might prove fruitful by the following year. Even easier would be covering the roof of your car with spore prints before going for a drive through farm country. :reb:


I have had raging success propagating wild edibles by gathering caps, then soaking them gills-down in a big bucket of water (~3 gallons) that I added a tablespoon of molasses and a pinch of salt to. After 6-8 hours I toss the caps out, then let the bucket sit overnight. The next day, pour the liquid now full of sprouting spores into a garden sprayer and go spray that pasture! Spray for wide distribution rather than concentrating a lot on to small areas; if it's suitable habitat, it'll take.

Since we're talking Psilocybes, this is probably a stealth mission so I'd get up before dawn the next day to do the spraying, which is probably a good idea in any case. You really, really don't want to get caught on someone's land while you're actively spraying something on it, so I can only recommend this if you have permission to be there or own it yourself.


Maybe bringing some manure clumps home would be better and put em in your back yard. Then inject em. I've heard people say this is impossible but hey it sounds like fun to try.


I've accomplished things in life that were far more difficult than scooping up some poop and bringing it home. I think whoever told you about what was "impossible" should zip it. Some people still debate about whether dunking cakes is useful just because they couldn't get it to work for them, implying they were capable of doing anything anyone suggested and if it didn't work right away for them, it must not be true. Well, maybe those people just suck at growing. :horse:

Better than just manure would be already-colonized manure. A friend of mine did this once, but keep in mind my friends are Super Heroes that do the impossible every day. :amazed: Using a snow shovel, he scooped up a large clump of old manure that was fruiting a massive flush of shrooms and put it in his hatchback on a piece of plastic. He left it there for three weeks, and every day he would open the back, hit it with a garden hose for a second or two, and pick some mushrooms. It constantly produced mushrooms over and over for all three weeks, then finally gave out. The hatchback gave out not long after so he finally got rid of that shitty car. It was good times, but was only tried once due to the lingering agrarian essence. :puke:.

#6 mjshroomer

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 10:00 AM

I've heard rumors of cubensis being found in some of the valley pastures, but nothing more than rumors. I think cubensis is moving North, just like everything else seems to be doing. I do know from experience that (outdoor) cultivated cubensis patches will grow and fruit beautifully in that region throughout the warm months.

I'd seed pastures with spores, then come back the following year.


There are no cubes in Tennessee. Theya re a rtropical to subtropical species of both hemispheres. And Tennessee is too cold for them to grow.

Seeding a pasture does not work in a climate where they do not grow. you could dump your grow log materials in a pasture and some cubes will grow from yuor materials but they will never return the following year.

Yuo could look for Pan subbs (a spring and fall season shroom) at a riding stable or a racetrack in the compost heaps but that sping season is now about over.


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#7 chrisandstepheny

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 10:34 AM

I have "seeded" a pasture just recently. I have access to an enclosed pasture that I am allowed to be on so it was pretty easy. We'll see if anything comes up. We just took a walmart sack full of jars that just weren't doing good. Some you could still see spore clumps (inoculated with a print) and others had small spots of mycelium growth. But I am in a gulf coast state so they grow here anyway.
I would definitely think if you have spores to spare then seed a pasture and see what grows. At any rate I don't see why they wouldn't grow if the conditions are right.

#8 TVCasualty

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 10:48 AM

There are no cubes in Tennessee. Theya re a rtropical to subtropical species of both hemispheres. And Tennessee is too cold for them to grow.


I have no confirmed reports, but trustworthy anecdotal sources. Lowland areas slightly west of Chattanooga along the TN/ AL border don't get nearly as cold, and is where the rumors claim they might be. That said, Tennessee is experiencing a gradual northward migration of flora and fauna from further south, fire ants being one example. USDA agriculture zone borders aren't the same as they used to be, so eventually I'm fairly confident we'll be finding confirmed wild cubes in TN.

Planted cube patches do fruit beautifully throughout the warm season there, so such efforts are well worth it. The times are a'changin', so some day one of those might take hold and go wild...

#9 Subbalteatus

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 12:54 PM

Quote [I have had raging success propagating wild edibles by gathering caps, then soaking them gills-down in a big bucket of water (~3 gallons) that I added a tablespoon of molasses and a pinch of salt to. After 6-8 hours I toss the caps out, then let the bucket sit overnight. The next day, pour the liquid now full of sprouting spores into a garden sprayer and go spray that pasture! Spray for wide distribution rather than concentrating a lot on to small areas; if it's suitable habitat, it'll take.]

TV Man that is awsome!!! what kind of edibles were they? Morels? The molasses is smart! I think if you could find subbalteatus you might venture with those : ) Or Copelandia : ) or whatever the hell you want : )

Keep me posted!

Subbal

#10 TVCasualty

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 06:53 PM

Oyster, turkey tail, maybe reishi (not many popped up; might've been coincidental), tried with Eastern cauliflower (Sparassis crispa) but haven't seen any since so no telling if any colonies took, and an as-yet-unidentified phosphorescent variety that worked amazingly well.

The turkey tails about took over like kudzu. I sprayed a tree that fell near the dirt road going by the property, and a few months later the woman who owns the cabin at the end of that road cut it up and stacked it for firewood. It's just her vacation cabin, so not much was burned. The following Spring, her entire wood pile erupted in turkey tails and by the end of Summer the logs were getting soft and useless for firewood.

The Eastern cauliflower mushrooms came up the first year I lived there, and were the best wild edible I've ever eaten. It was a very, very wet summer that year, and they haven't been seen on the property since (about 11 years at this point).

I found some foxfire glowing on a log one night, and it was fruiting at the time but I still haven't been able to ID it. I was able to rule it out as a species of Armillaria, which is parasitic to trees. Anyhow, I sprayed some spores on a log I'd cut lengthwise to use as a bridge over a small creek, and I sprayed a few other logs along the trail. It only took about 4 months before I saw the edge of the log over the creek glowing green all around its edge. It looked like runway lights. Parts of the trail were glowing also, so now I could run full-speed along it at night without falling in the creek, which I had to do occasionally. That was incredible, and like the cauliflower mushrooms, I've not seen it since. Now that I know how to clone them, they quit appearing of course. :mad:

#11 dragonstud725

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 07:55 PM

Thats an intresting way to seed a field guys, I havent seen that many mushrooms of any kind lately prob due to not geting much rain in the spring. I have some growing materials thats just about spent I plan on planting and seeing what will come of it prob nothing but It will be intresting just to see I might even add alittle manure to it.

#12 Lazlo

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 05:54 PM

They grow in the mountains of N.C., so I don't see why they couldn't due west. They've been found as far north as W.V. too.

#13 chimp

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 07:08 PM

My cousin has a place outside of Gatlinburg, TN and there is a horse pasture below his home( he lives on the side of a hill ) I have seen cubensis growing in this pasture. He did not put any spawn there ..this was at least 4 years ago.

#14 dragonstud725

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 07:42 PM

My cousin has a place outside of Gatlinburg, TN and there is a horse pasture below his home( he lives on the side of a hill ) I have seen cubensis growing in this pasture. He did not put any spawn there ..this was at least 4 years ago.

Thanks guys, I guess I will go hit up some horse pastures in east tenn and see whats growing it should be fun. I just allways wondered about Tennessee its not in the deep south and its not in the north and the winters have become pretty mild over that last 10 years.

#15 Lazlo

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 08:57 PM

My cousin has a place outside of Gatlinburg, TN and there is a horse pasture below his home( he lives on the side of a hill ) I have seen cubensis growing in this pasture. He did not put any spawn there ..this was at least 4 years ago.



I lived an hour from there. Just over the parkway.

#16 golly

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 09:04 PM

I used to pick scads of 'em just East of Memphis in extreme northern Mississippi..Several different pastures..June and early July were peak season b4 the real heat of summer arrived with long dry periods...

#17 sangraal

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 09:34 PM

I used to have a copy of the "National Audubon Society Field Guide to Mushrooms", it's whereabouts presently unknown, but I do seem to recall that in TN (I'm originally from Knoxville) , one can find the "Coniferous Psilocybe"(Psilocybe pelliculosa) is native to the area despite most claims that its centric to the West around California and Oregon. The Conifer mushroom, as it name implies, can be found in forests of conifer trees, usually around decaying stumps or logs. I've also found what appears to have been cones growing in mulch here in NC.

It's a relatively weak mushroom, less than half as potent as your typical cube, but it's "active" in the since that it contains the hallucinogenic compounds. They grow in sometimes massive clusters and have lovely fruit, so if it's worth your time, I'd look around. If not, cubes aren't all that rare, just not easily found.

#18 mjshroomer

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 10:52 PM

I used to have a copy of the "National Audubon Society Field Guide to Mushrooms", it's whereabouts presently unknown, but I do seem to recall that in TN (I'm originally from Knoxville) , one can find the "Coniferous Psilocybe"(Psilocybe pelliculosa) is native to the area despite most claims that its centric to the West around California and Oregon. The Conifer mushroom, as it name implies, can be found in forests of conifer trees, usually around decaying stumps or logs. I've also found what appears to have been cones growing in mulch here in NC.
It's a relatively weak mushroom, less than half as potent as your typical cube, but it's "active" in the since that it contains the hallucinogenic compounds. They grow in sometimes massive clusters and have lovely fruit, so if it's worth your time, I'd look around. If not, cubes aren't all that rare, just not easily found.


The only Psilocybe species which is active in Tennessee is Psilocybe caerulipes. It grows along streams and riverbanks from Northern Florida to Maine and east to Michigan.

P. pelliculosa is a northern cold weather species which appears in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and British Colombia, Canada. It does not grow along the the east coast.

A related species which macroscopically resembles P,. pelliculosa is P. silvatica which grows in northern New york. But neither grow in Tennessee. And both grow in man-made environments. in their natural habitat they are rare and far and widely apart form collections of one to another.

P. pelliculosa has a dosage of one half fresh ounce or two to three dried grams. It is twice as potent by weight as P. cubensis which has a dosage ratio of 3-5 dried grams or one fresh ounce.

Two images of small colonies
http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1213415399

http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1213415399

and then

They grow in alder chips and mulch in the PNW in clear cuts by the hundreds of thousands. Everywhere where the bull dozers first ran through the clear cuts until the alder seeds grow to ten feet or more in a three year period.

example below
http://mycotopia.net...=1&d=1213415399

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Attached Thumbnails

  • onehundredthousandshrooms5.jpg
  • pelliculosa26.jpg
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#19 sangraal

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 11:29 PM

The only Psilocybe species which is active in Tennessee is Psilocybe caerulipes. It grows along streams and riverbanks from Northern Florida to Maine and east to Michigan.
mjshroomer


Cubes do grow in TN, lived there, saw them, ate 'em.

The other info I do recall seeing in the Audubon book with the range of the Conifer Psilocybe ranging from NY down to TN and NC, but no further down. The temps in the part of NC in which I live usually remains quite cold into the later part of Spring and the coldness sets in during early-mid Fall. It's not an identical climate to that of WA, however, I still think it's quite possible and that which I saw, growing from mulch piles, resembled those in the photos exactly. One site that you mentioned in another thread on the same mushroom stated that Pelliculosa has been reported up to NY.

Like the cubes in general, I think they have a better adaptability rate in the wild than we think they do...

#20 Lazlo

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 09:08 AM

Isn't that Oakridge from Tenn.?

Psilocybe cubensis has been found in the Smokey Mountain area for decades.




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