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Cotton Bur Compost


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#1 sandman

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 12:31 AM

http://www.gardenhei...=cotton compost'

guys i saw this stuff at the garden center today. There was a open bag and i checked it out. Very interesting shit, its 100% cotton burr, pre composted for 3 months at temps aproaching 160.

I was wondering if anyone has ever tried to grow on it. It is very cheap and pre composted so it shouldnt need any pastuerization should it?

Back To Nature Cotton Burr Compost is truly nature’s perfect soil conditioner. We start with cotton gin trash from short, staple cotton
grown on the high plains of Texas. Unlike the cotton grown in other parts of the United States, short, staple cotton must be stripper picked, a
method that results in a large amount of cotton burr (boll) in the resulting gin trash. The fleshy cotton burr is important because it is the
primary repository of nutrients. Cotton burrs contain a significant amount of NPK (nitrogen, phosphate, potassium), the three macro-nutrients
required by plants, as well as numerous micro-nutrients. Cotton burrs have a carbon nitrogen (c/n) ratio of 22:1, eliminating the nitrogen tieup
caused by using wood and wood based soil amendments.
A word about the chemicals used on cotton: The USDA and EPA now require that all chemicals used on cotton be biodegradable within a
two week period. An additional safeguard with cotton grown on the Texas High Plains is that early freezes all but eliminate the need for
chemical defoliation. Laboratory tests show that all potentially harmful elements and chemicals in Back To Nature Composts are well below
the recommended EPA minimums and, in some cases, less than those that occur in nature. An additional safeguard is our voluntary
compliance with the requirements of the United States Composting Council. Our products carry the USCC Seal of Testing Assurance.
When properly composted, cotton burrs are a natural fertilizer with a protein content
of approximately 35 percent, making them an excellent food source for the beneficial
soil organisms that help to make nutrients available to plants, as well as aerating the
soil and helping to keep harmful organisms and diseases in check. The outstanding
ability of cotton burr compost to loosen tight, clay soils has been common knowledge
in the Southern United States since the invention of the cotton gin. Cotton burr compost
has excellent moisture retention characteristics and, unlike peat moss, accepts and
retains water easily and also re-wets easily if dried out. Regular cotton burr compost
helps to neutralize soil pH and, if additional acidification is needed, our acidified
products contain sulfur, the longest lasting of the elemental acidifiers and an essential
micro-nutrient. Back To Nature Cotton Burr Compost is economical to use with an
effective soil life of up to two full growing seasons.
Back To Nature composts are produced through aerobic, windrow composting for
approximately three months at temperatures approaching 160° F, ensuring the
elimination of insects, weed, chemicals and pathogens. They are then screened to the
desired texture, packaged, and stored inside for curing to ensure the customer of a consistent, high quality product.
Back To Nature Cotton Burr Compost is available in three textures: Coarse in a 3 cu. ft. bag, medium in a 2 cu. ft. bag, and fine in a 1 cu.
ft. bag. Coarse and medium are available regular or acidified with sulfur. Fine is regular only



#2 Hippie3

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 05:05 AM

always wondered about cotton seed hulls too
maybe a decent verm substitute

#3 Guest_Peter Cottontail_*

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 07:50 AM

Cotton seed hulls are an excellent substrate material. I used to use them when I lived down south where they are available. It sounds as if the burrs are much the same thing? I don't think it would be a verm substitute, but more of a compost material. Stamets lists cotton seed hulls as an excellent oyster substrate as well.
RR

#4 Hippie3

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 07:58 AM

I don't think it would be a verm substitute,RR


why ?

#5 Guest_Peter Cottontail_*

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 07:59 AM

Because verm is inert and cotton byproducts have nutrients.
RR

#6 Hippie3

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 08:11 AM

ah,
i was being un-clear.
i was thinking for use in a brf cake itself,
not as a casing nor as a filter material
as there are other materials/methods to cover those needs.
but as a cake material, mixed with brf and water,
i wonder if it might perhaps do ok.

#7 sandman

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 10:40 AM

I would guess that cotton seed hulls are simply just seeds, this stuff is a mix of what apears to be thin sticks which are the stalks of the cotton burr and about 1.5" long, at arround 10% by the looks of it, and the rest is organic matter more like mulch looking but soft and not wood, along with a little bit of white cotton here and there. Its a varying mix, very interesting.


Anyway, I am going to go ahead and buy some and test it out, why the shit not its nonly like $4 for 2 cubic feet.

I wish I had my camera still!

Since this stuff is composted in what apears to be a Proper fashion, will it be necesary to pastuerize it? As youve all guessed im in dire search of the store bought no pastuerization bulk method. One day I will find it...one day. Maybe its today!

Good to see you twos d00ds in good spirits these days! Thanks for replies!

#8 Hippie3

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 10:54 AM

nope, the hulls are what is left
after the seed is removed

#9 maynardsdick

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 04:46 PM

i've used a mix of worm castings, black kow, cotton burr compost, and vermiculite that has served me well. its some good stuff.

#10 sandman

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 05:13 PM

OK, my FOAF has made 4 test trays.

They were prepared the following manner

loaded tray about 40-45% with cotton burr compost straight out of the bag
Loaded the other 60-65% with worm castings
Threw 2 handfulls of crushed oyster shells on top
Sprinkled about 1/2 cup of pulverised limestone on top
sprayed the whole concoction with water (1 gal/pinch of hydrated lime/1.5 tbspn bleach)
Mixed thoroughly, and added more water to achieve what was considered proper hydration
Added one quart of spawn and mixed thoroughly
covered in foil and poked about 6 holes with a syringe

He made each tray individually and didnt pastuerize anything. They are sitting out on a shelf.

I wish my foaf had a camera but he dont. I will keep you guys updated

#11 Hippie3

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 05:17 PM

what was used as spawn ?

#12 sandman

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 05:19 PM

rye for 2 and wbs for 2, amazon multispore. The rye was LC and the WBS was spore water.

#13 Guest_golly_*

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 05:43 PM

Cotton waste is the favorite substrate for the paddystraw mushroom -a very tasty and rapidly growing shroom from SE Asia, which i have my sights set on for next summer...They need 80-90F to friut...

#14 sandman

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 01:14 PM

The trays are at 70% colonized easily. Preeeeeeeeetty rhyzomophic growth. 0 contams so far. Prolly gonna case in a few days with 50.50+ mix of my own, unsterilzed.

#15 Hippie3

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 04:05 PM

wonder how it turned out ?

#16 Guest_Peter Cottontail_*

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 04:15 PM

Probably contaminated. He didn't pasteurize.
RR

#17 Guest_freakachino_*

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 04:56 PM

I wonder too how this turned out for Sandman.




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