Paradox
©
Fisana

Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

celebrating 100 years of einstein's visions


  • Please log in to reply
70 replies to this topic

#1 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:24 PM

in 1905
albert einstein,
building on the work of many other brilliant minds,
published a series of 5 papers that fundamentally altered
human society and thinking forever.
he saw the unity behind the universe itself,
that e=mc2,
that matter and energy were the same,
and that there was only one universal constant-
the speed of light.
time and space itself could distort,
but light itself was constant.

he saw for the first time that energy could be turned into mass
by speeding an object up.
as one approaches C [lightspeed],
adding more energy doesn't add to velocity,
but energy must go somewhere,
so it becomes mass.
matter has been created.

further he saw that matter could be turned back into energy,
by splitting the atomic nucleus.

a brilliant woman physicist,
a jew
hounded out of nazi germany,
betrayed by her lab partner,
was the first to understand.

she hurled neutrons into an uranium-238 nucleus
hoping to
create new, heavier elements.
instead she found smaller atoms ,
what at first they thought were contaminants,
but no new super-massive element.

a flash of insight took her one winter's day,
while out for a walk,
she realized that the smaller atoms were being created by the
fission [splitting] of the uranium nucleus,
triggered by the
neutron's impact.
the mass of 2 of the smaller atoms almost exactly equalled
the mass of 1 uranium,
being short a mass approx. equal to 1/5th of one proton.
further calculations revealed that the fission of a nucleus
released about 200 million electron volts,
a number that, using einsein's equation of e=mc2,
exactly equalled the missing mass of that 1/5th of a proton.

thus was born our nulclear world.

anyone know the name of this woman,
who never got the credit
she deserved in life due to the ignorance and sexism of her day
??
i'll give a free print of goliaths
to the person who first posts her name correctly

#2 dead_diver

dead_diver

    Stoned Since '76

  • OG VIP
  • 3,541 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:34 PM

Marie Curie?

#3 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:35 PM

nope.

#4 dead_diver

dead_diver

    Stoned Since '76

  • OG VIP
  • 3,541 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:38 PM

Irene Curie?

#5 dead_diver

dead_diver

    Stoned Since '76

  • OG VIP
  • 3,541 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:42 PM

Lise Meitner

#6 dead_diver

dead_diver

    Stoned Since '76

  • OG VIP
  • 3,541 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:43 PM

What was I thinking? Curie is French...doh

#7 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:43 PM

Lise Meitner


bingo.
:bow:
pm me to collect yer print.

#8 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:45 PM

see
http://www.sdsc.edu/...en/meitner.html

#9 dead_diver

dead_diver

    Stoned Since '76

  • OG VIP
  • 3,541 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:46 PM

Very good read. I had no idea...

#10 Beast

Beast

    That's Mr. Beast to you..

  • Expired Member
  • 3,930 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:48 PM

It seems that Einstein got help from more than one woman, there was also Mileva Maric, whom he married, and probably did the mathematics for his Relativity theory. I found this on wikipedia:

The extent of Mileva's contribution to Einstein's Annus Mirabilis Papers is controversial. According to Evan Harris Walker, a physicist, the basic ideas for relativity came from Mileva. Senta Troemel-Ploetz, a German linguist, says that the ideas may have been Albert's, but Mileva did the mathematics. On the other hand, John Stachel, keeper of Albert's letters, says that Mileva was little more than a sounding board. The case for Mileva as co-genius mostly depends on letters in which Albert referred to "our" theory and "our" work and on a divorce agreement in which Albert promised her his Nobel Prize money. He gave to Mileva the money from the Nobel Prize he received but he did not publicly acknowledge her scientific involvement in his work. Mileva used the award money to support their sons.

Biographer Abram Joffe claims to have seen an original manuscript for the theory of relativity which was signed, "Einstein-Maric". Life and love had an unequal effect in lives of Einstein and Mileva as man and woman, and as scientists. Einstein left her for another woman (they divorced in 1919) and Mileva spent the rest of her life struggling to support herself and her children, including a psychotic son.


Guess it wasn't who you were thinking of though...

#11 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:52 PM

yeah, albert turned into a real bastard once he became
rich and famous, abandoning his partner to obscure poverty.

#12 dead_diver

dead_diver

    Stoned Since '76

  • OG VIP
  • 3,541 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:56 PM

Hmm, this Goliath strain is new to me. What are the origins?

#13 dead_diver

dead_diver

    Stoned Since '76

  • OG VIP
  • 3,541 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 12 October 2005 - 07:56 PM

Instant asshole. Just add money LOL

#14 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 08:05 PM

Hmm, this Goliath strain is new to me. What are the origins?



see
http://mycotopia.net...read.php?t=4937

#15 shedthemonkey

shedthemonkey

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 1,455 posts

Posted 12 October 2005 - 09:04 PM

Ahhh Physics. Its fun to try to understand the rest of the story of the smaller particles and how probablility becomes more and more important. A great and readable book on the subject of Relativistic Physics is called "Alice in Quantumland." They try hard to use the Lewis Carrol characters because this shit is so bizare, and they succeed pretty well. :) Recommended for nerds like us.

#16 Hippie3

Hippie3

    DUNG DEALER

  • Founders
  • 40,642 posts

Posted 14 October 2005 - 12:11 PM

alice eh ?
might have to obtain a copy,
i'm a big fan.
i really wish i had a better grasp of the mathematics behind it all
but alas, my mind is more attuned to the verbal side.
but yeah, i'll take the guilty plea for being a nerd/geek
when it comes to just about any science.
inquiring minds want to know,
yo.
;)

#17 shedthemonkey

shedthemonkey

    Mycotopiate

  • Expired Member
  • 1,455 posts

Posted 14 October 2005 - 03:12 PM

That is one of the nice things about this book. Pretty well no math. They do it in prose and some clever wood-cut looking cartoons that resemble the original alice drawings but usually illustrate some strange principle. You'd like it. I am a physics monkey and some of it goes right over my head but it is still fun. :D

Full title: Alice in Quantumland: An Allegory of Quantum Physics, by Robert Gilmore.

http://www.amazon.co...UI=#reader-link

That will take you to Amazon where you can read the first 6 pages and see the index. :)

#18 BuckarooBanzai

BuckarooBanzai

    The Abe Vigoda of Mycotopia

  • Moderator
  • 8,968 posts

Awards Bar:

Posted 15 October 2005 - 02:44 PM

Okay, I don’t want to offend anybody, but I have passionate feelings about physics. Einstein was brilliant, there is no doubt. His theories were revolutionary and extended the grasp of human consciousness. Relativity is probably the greatest single contribution to physics ever made by a single person.

However…Einstein was wrong about a couple of pretty basic things (he was also FAR too precious about his own theories, especially when he got older). And yes, he was also reported to be quite the misogynist ass towards the end. We need to break away from Classical Relativistic physics...

One of the base assumptions of Relativity is the speed of light law. The law is, however, in fundamental disagreement with experimental evidence. It is wrong. Things DO travel faster than light.

Quantum correlation occurs over vast distances instantaneously (much faster than the theoretical speed limit imposed by light). Einstein called Quantum correlation “spooky actions at a distance,” and sneered at the very possibility. The concept so offended him, he uttered the famous quote: “God does not play dice with the universe.” Wrong again, Albert…

Quantum correlation has been demonstrated through experiment time and again.

Google “Nicolas Gisin correlation experiment Geneva” and you’ll see page after page about a Quantum correlation experiment conducted in 1997. It was such an upset to the Relativity applecart that it has been written up and dissected literally hundreds of times.

In a nutshell, Gisin shot pairs of identically generated photons into fiber optic cables and let them go to opposite ends of Geneva. At distance of more than 10km, they were acted upon by an interferometer and then forced to choose between two equally possible paths of travel through a counter/detector. After thousands upon thousands of hits, Gisin correlated the data and found a mathematical agreement of 95.5% in what path through the detector each photon took. Gisin’s equipment had a 4.6% margin of error.

10km apart, two twin particles communicated instantaneously with each other and made identical decisions about a response to random stimuli that only acted upon one of them. “Spooky actions at a distance” had been proven, yet again, but with REALLY expensive equipment this time.

Relativity specifically predicts a random Bell type response from such an experiment. The photons of light cannot communicate with one another as they are already traveling away from each other at the same speed necessary to communicate with one another. Since the photons cannot communicate, Relativity predicts no statistical relationship between their behaviors when confronted by random decisions many kilometers apart. According to Relativity, particle A has no possible physical way of knowing (or responding to) what happens to photon B.

Quantum correlation theory says that since the particles were created in the same reaction, they are identical and will behave identically for life. No matter their separation distance in space and time, they will maintain a Quantum entanglement that allows them both to respond equally to stimuli on only one of them. Quantum field theory predicts that the communication of this entanglement is instantaneous and, subsequently, far faster than the speed of light. Gisin demonstrated Quantum entanglement communicated instantaneously over a distance of more than 10km.

These “spooky actions at a distance” are the very nature of Quantum reality and they utterly violate the precept of the speed of light theorem, one of Relativity’s corner stones. Relativity is just a theory…and there are better ones…

Quantum correlation also explains one of the hated bugaboos of Einstein’s professional career: the Einstein-Rosen bridge or “wormhole.” Einstein’s space time, you see, is full of these wormholes that Relativity can’t explain yet it also can’t disallow. Certain oddities of the mathematics and correction factors even predict them (playing with the numbers is how Rosen originally found them). Quantum correlation explains these wormholes intrinsically. This is one of the reasons that Einstein the “elder statesman of physics” very much despised Quantum theory – it explains something he wrote off as erroneous mathematical variance.

Einstein was wrong about gravity, too. Just wait about a year or so for the Gravity Probe B data to be fully published. I’ve seen some very rough work with the raw numbers on the NASA site. The space warp/drag theory predicted by Einstein’s gravitational model just doesn’t seem to be there. The “gravity well” is quite obviously not affecting the digital gyroscope’s periodicity even during the true supercool/superconductive phases. The next five years will be filled with a lot of Quantum/Classical stone throwing over this experiment. FUN STUFF!!!!! This is why money in the budget for science (and space) is crucial to our future as a species.

Wanna read a book that will make physics make a little more sense? Almost no math and it presents a lovely little theory that relates far more to fractals and chaos than it does to rules and absolutes. This theory this book explains is Superstring theory. The book is “The Elegant Universe” by Brian Greene. If you would like to see the whole thing explained with diagrams and simple terms, point your browser at:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/elegant/

Spend a couple of hours exploring that site and tell me what you think. No need leave your chair OR kill a tree. PBS ROCKS!!!

Relativity is yesterday’s news…quaint, yet inadequate, in the same vein as classical Newtonian physics, Bohr’s atomic model and the flat Earth. Clinging to it is part of our problem. Screw Descarte and Aristotle. Give me Discordianism and fractal chaos magic!

#19 mr_dimple

mr_dimple

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 49 posts

Posted 15 October 2005 - 03:55 PM

Want to second BuckarooBanzai's advice about Brian Greene's book - it's a great read. The Nova series, I thought, was very so-so, lots of fluff like most recent Novas, better off spending a few hours with the book.

#20 swampdogz

swampdogz

    Mycophiliac

  • Expired Member
  • 12 posts

Posted 16 October 2005 - 04:45 PM

it's my contention that our fungi friends has helped me to appreciate the various levels of existence possible. understanding these possibilities,for me, is another thing altogether. :) s.d.




Like Mycotopia? Become a member today!