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#61 Ras Asad

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 05:06 PM

lol,

i feed the squirrels.

#62 mushroommaster7

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 05:19 PM

i work with a Gamo, .177 1,200 fps... i need to try this out

#63 roc

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 05:23 PM

We always waited until winter set in before we picked off a cotton tail and a few squirrels and roasted them in the same broiling pot... good food indeed.

#64 Hippie3

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 07:53 PM

lol,

i feed the squirrels.

karma.
squirrels feed me.
balance.
:meditate:

#65 mushroommaster7

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 07:54 PM

karma.
squirrels feed me.
balance.
:meditate:




hehe, i get a kick out of this

#66 Hippie3

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 09:08 AM

famous squirrel recipe- Brunswick Stew

A Tradition with Taste

The original Brunswick Stew, according to Brunswick County historians, was created in 1828 by black chef, "Uncle" Jimmy Matthews. As the story goes, Dr. Creed Haskins, of Mount Donum on the Nottoway River and a member of the Virginia State Legislature for a number of years, took several friends on a hunting expedition. While the group hunted, Jimmy Matthews, Dr. Haskin's camp cook, hunted squirrel for the evening meal. Matthews slowly stewed the squirrels with butter, onions, stale bread and seasoning in a large iron pot. While the hunting party returned they were reluctant to try the new, thick concoction but, one taste convinced them to ask for more. Since that time, Brunswick Stew has been prepared by many different stew masters and they continue to produce large batches of the "Virginia ambrosia" for church functions, local fund raisers, family reunions, and political rallies


Yield
20 servings

Measure Ingredient
10 eaches Squirrels; disjointed
2 cups Corn
1 pounds Bacon; diced
5 pounds Potatoes; diced
2 quarts Tomatoes
3 pounds Onions; diced
2 pounds Lima beans
1 cup Celery; diced
Salt and pepper to taste
ΒΌ cup Worcestershire sauce
Flour

Place the squirrels in a large kettle; add water to half cover. Bring to a boil. Cover and simmer until squirrels are tender. Cool. Remove squirrels from stock and remove meat from bones. Place squirrel meat back into stock and add next nine ingredients; cook two hours. Thicken stew with a small amount of flour mixed with water; simmer 30 minutes longer.

#67 warriorsoul

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 10:21 AM

Thanks for the recipes!
Chipmunks are ok to eat also, the legs are most of the meat but the breast is good if you have the patience, but its hard to find enough of them! Chipmunks can be used in any squirrel recipe, use two or three chipmunks for each squirrel. Check your state laws about hunting/trapping chipmunks.
Here is a tasty recipe.

3 Bean Chipmunk Chili


First, you are going to need about 10 or so fat chipmunks - best thing to do is capture the little buggers and fatten them up. This way you can make sure they are disease free. Also, you can monitor what they eat. Unless you don't care then, just go out and hunt down 10-15 chipmunks. If you use a shotgun, please make sure to remove all shot from the meat first. IF you use any "Road Meat" chipmunks, please make sure they are fresh kills - makes it easier to peel the fur off.

Use a cat capture cage, bait it with peanut butter. Once you have captured about 10 to 15 of the little guys, set them up in large cages (each cage should measure 4 x 4 at least). Do not put more than 1 or 2 to a cage. Give them bird houses to live out of.

Now for the next 2-3 months, feed those little guys. Plenty of veggies, (carrots apples, etc.) nuts, (walnuts, etc. shells off) fresh water (put some vitamins into the water), oatmeal. Keep the cages clean.

When the day comes, just shoot the little buggers right there in their cages. Make sure you decapitate them right after and strip their fur off. Hold them upside down to make sure all the blood runs out.

Save the fur - you can make a nice pair of gloves with them later.

With a sharp knife, de-bone the little guys, but save the bones. Once you have your pile of bones, put them in a 2 qt pan and boil them. You will use this as your stock for your chili.

Chop up meat into fine pieces or grind.
  • 2 lb. Chipmunk meat pieces
  • 1 small yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 small green pepper, chopped
  • 2 cans (16 oz. each) Dark Red Kidney Beans, undrained
  • 2 cans (16 oz. each) Pinto Beans, undrained
  • 2 cans (16 oz. each) Black Beans, undrained
  • 1 can (14.5 oz.) diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 can (6 oz.) tomato paste
  • 2 envelopes chili seasoning mix 1/2 tsp.
  • Ground Cinnamon 1-1/4 cups Sour Cream
Use your broth you made from the bones to boil the meat in a large sauce pot on low heat.

Make sure you do this slowly, use a slow cooker to make the meat tender. Cook for about 3 hours on low heat. Then let it set for 30 minutes and skim off any fat.

Add onion and green pepper; cook until tender, bring up to a low boil on medium heat, stirring frequently.

ADD all remaining ingredients except sour cream; mix well. Bring to boil; cover. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

SPOON into soup bowls; top with sour cream.

YUM!

And for desert
Turnpike Turnovers

6 chipmunks
Tube of puff pastry dough
1/4 c. powdered sugar
1/4 c. milk
6 acorns

Skin and cut chipmunks. Wash and place acorn in each mouth. Divide pastry, pat flat, place chipmunk on pastry and roll like taco. Brush with milk. Sprinkle with sugar. Bake at 375 degrees for 40 minutes on cookie sheet.

I also have a recipe for Chipmunk Fricassee if anyone is interested.

#68 Hippie3

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 10:39 AM

l

If you use a shotgun, please make sure to remove all shot from the meat first.

lol
one imagines there's not going to be much chipmonk left
if blasted with a shotgun...

#69 mushroommaster7

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 12:17 PM

the shot isn't even made out of lead anymore is it?

#70 Hippie3

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 03:19 PM

some is, most isn't. it'll be labelled if it's steel shot.
some don't like to fire steel shot in their barrels, esp. with inserts like a choke.

#71 lovedinplaster

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 08:42 PM

wich type of squirrel is best used?

#72 Hippie3

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 09:18 PM

dead.

#73 jrogers311

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 05:38 AM

wich type of squirrel is best used?

Preferably country squirrels, as a friend of mine said"city squirrels just don't taste the same as reservation squirrels.":thumbup:

#74 dpwishy

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 10:20 AM

How is everyone's squirrel and chipmunk population? Has your area seen an increase of activity of these animals, or a decrease? or has the population stayed the same for the most part as you have noticed over the years? This year there has been allot of concern over the population in the New york/New England Area. This is due to a lack of acorns and nuts. There has been allot of talk about it in this area, research lately has shown that the tree's are not having a good year with producing acorns, some species are doing well, but most are not doing good at all. Although there seems to be niches or pockets where some area's are doing ok, where others are bare, maybe it has something to do with how much rain we had this summer but who knows?

love, peace, compassion and respect
-wishy




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