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baking bread


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#1 Hippie3

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 10:17 AM

anyone here into making own bread ?
the heavenly aroma alone is worth the effort.
got a recipe to share ?

#2 Dr_T

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 10:27 AM

I got a bread machine at Goodwill for $3.50.

Fresh bread is so delicious, I just make the regular white bread.
Flour, water, oil, sugar. A bit of salt, and some yeast.

I keep meaning to try some new recipe, but somehow I never do. The machine makes jam too- that's equally amazing.

Matter of fact, I think I'll go start a loaf now- thanks for suggesting it.

#3 Hippie3

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 10:49 AM

yeah, the bread machines make it easy
but the old way by hand
gives a sweeter, fluffier dough.

#4 steeq

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 10:57 AM

I have a recipe for beer bread. I'll see if I can get it.

#5 Hippie3

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 11:00 AM

good source
tassajara bread book

#6 cuts

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 11:20 AM

aww..i was going to ask if you were interested in a beer bread recipe.

#7 Hippie3

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 11:27 AM

post it

#8 TastyBeverage

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 11:36 AM

I make gluten free bread because i'm allergic to wheat, but you're probly not interested. Plus, it's kind of hard to find all of the ingredients if you're not by a good natural foods store. I have tons of cookbooks though, i'll go look for some regular wheat bread recipes for you.

#9 MycoChondria

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 12:07 PM

I make gluten free bread because i'm allergic to wheat, but you're probly not interested. Plus, it's kind of hard to find all of the ingredients if you're not by a good natural foods store...


Bev, I have the same problem. I used to make my own bread using recipes from a book called "The Italian Baker" by Carol Field. Damn, I miss making my own bread more than just about anything I've had to give up. If you have a recipe for tapioca-bread, please share :bow:. I can buy the dough frozen in the supermarket ("Chebe" is the brand name) but the price is wayyy to high and I'd prefer to roll-my-own. Have baking-stone, will travel....

Hip, you are spot-on re: the smell of baking bread...truly sublime.

#10 TastyBeverage

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 12:18 PM

Bev, I have the same problem.


My brother! Is it celiac's? That's what i have. I've been experimenting for a while with different flour mixes and finally came up with one that really resembles gluten bread when it's baked. It's soft and chewey and pretty fluffy; not like those dense bricks they sell in the natural food stores.

First off, my flour mix:

2 1/2 C Brown rice flour
2 C White rice flour
1/2 C corn starch
3/4 C + 2 T Tapioca flour
3 T Xantham gum

This will make between 2 to 2 1/2 pounds of all purpose flour. You won't use all of it for the bread recipe, but it's nice to have some around.

On to the bread recipe:

1/2 C warm soy milk
2 ts sugar
4 ts yeast

Mix these together and let stand while you mix the other ingredients.

4 C Gluten free flour mix
1/4 C sugar
1 1/2 ts Salt
1 3/4 C soy milk
4 T vegetable oil (do not use olive)
3 eggs

Add the yeast mixture to the other ingredients and then beat on high for 2 minutes. It is thick, so you may have to do this is a couple of phases to prevent your mixer motor from overheating as well as to push the dough down from the blades as it tends to rise up and get all over the bottom of the mixer.

Grease your hands with some vegetable oil and shape the dough into buns or pour into 2 small loaf pans, cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise in a warm place. Because of the sugar content, the outside of the loaves will tend to burn before the inside is done, so be sure to use 2 smaller loaf pans instead of one large one. You may also want to cover with foil halfway through cooking to prevent the top from over browning.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. If making sandwich buns (which i prefer) they will be done in about 20 minutes. The loaves will take maybe 40 minutes depending on the size of the pans, but check them by inserting a knife in the center. If it comes out clean, they're done.

It smells SO GOOD while cooking. Maybe i'll make some today! I like to take the buns with me sometimes when i go out to eat with my friends. The local burger joints all know me by now as the lady who brings her own buns. :weedpoke: The bread is quite perishable, so when i make a loaf i like to slice it as soon as it cools and then stick it in the freezer. Then you just take out how ever many slices you want at a time and give them a quick nuke in the microwave on the defrost setting. I don't bother freezing the buns because i eat them too quick. :)

BTW, i spent a long time formulating the recipe, so there really can't be any substitutions or it just won't turn out right. However, if you experiment further and have some good results, please share!

#11 Hippie3

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 12:23 PM

the lady who brings her own buns.

heh.
too easy.
no comment.
:reb:

#12 MycoChondria

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 12:26 PM

My brother! Is it celiac's? :weedpoke:


Yuppers my sister, it's Celiac :puke:. Maybe someday we'll have a pill for it so I can eat real Italian bread again (sigh)

Many, many thanks for the recipe. I'll have to try the bun-thing next time I go to BK :bow:

#13 TastyBeverage

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 12:39 PM

heh.
too easy.
no comment.
:reb:


:D I guess that could have been my title here since one of the earliest things i did after joining was BNL.

Hot damn, i gotta figure out a halloween costume so i can post in the new BNL!


Yuppers my sister, it's Celiac . Maybe someday we'll have a pill for it so I can eat real Italian bread again (sigh)


I totally feel your pain. I hear there's some research just starting up to get us some better meds, so here's hoping for the near future!

#14 TastyBeverage

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 02:08 PM

I have a nice bread coffee table book from before i found out about my allergy. There's lot of recipes in it, so i took pictures of a few for you. If you have any special requests, i can look for them. I was too lazy to transcribe, plus i figured the recipes would be better with pics anyways.

#15 Beast

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 03:04 PM

I've performed this task a few times. I'm not much of a bread eater, as I'm experimenting with various diets, most of which shy away from high carbs. Mostly its just turning out that my problem is that I make portions that are much too big for my body to handle. I've been weighing my portions of meat and whatnot lately, and it turns out I've in general been eating 2-3x as much as my body can theoretically handle without converting most of it to fat for storage.

Sorry for the tangent, but its relevant, as one of the diet plans I was reading about was very down on wheat products in general, and had me fixating on bread as being the culprit for the donut around my midsection. So I started looking into wheat alternatives. I don't have celiac's but I do have a friend with a very similar condition, probably is celiac's, he just hasn't been to a doc to get it diagnosed and has just been avoiding things that give him rashes after eating them :eusa_booh.

So, that's where my bread recipe comes in. I used spelt flour as opposed to wheat flour, supposedly lacking the wheat gluten, but I'm not fully sure about that as its still a pretty similar looking grain. The argument for it is that spelt is one of the 'ancient grains' that has been in use by humans for much longer than wheat, thus our bodies have had more time to adapt to it. You may have seen 'Bible bread' or other such products, often these are sprouted grain breads, and are refrigerated so they won't be located with the normal breads. For the wheat gluten sensitive readers out there, you might want to consider sprouted grain breads, as the wheat germ is destroyed or used or something, in the germination process of sprouting the grains b4 making bread out of them.

Anyways, that's the background on getting me to developing this recipe, which I developed by modifying a normal bread recipe in this great little book I have that's about saving lots of money by making things from scratch. At first it seems like its easy to discard this process by saying spending 3-4 hours making 3 loaves of bread is not worth it, since you can buy a loaf for about $3-4 (?)... but if I'm going to spend my Saturday lounging in topia chat and watching the boob tube, then maybe my time isn't as valuable as I'd like to think....

Before I get to the recipe, I'd like to share the two books that I used to learn how to make bread, as I'm a single bachelor who stereotypically eats ramen and pizza because we're somehow unable to cook for ourselves.

The $1.98 Cookbook by Carl Japikse: How to eat like a gourmet and save $6000 a year. The savings are based on a family of 4, but if you divide that down to a single person that's still $1500 to be saved on my food bill. The book goes to great extents to show that its not the time we spend on food, its the money. If it costs approximately 3.5 cents per slice to buy bread, then it only costs about 1.5 cent per slice to make it from scratch at home: that comes out to 50 cents a day, $185 per year for a family of 4. This stuff really adds up, and it seems to be much better than clipping coupons. Honestly my goal is to develop a food budget for myself where I'm eating stuff I've made at home from scratch, on the cheap, as opposed to going out to a restaurant and paying easily 20 times the cost of the original ingredients. The recipes in this book seem like they'd be a little rudimentary, but after trying a few out, I've found little need for change.

But everyone likes a little flash, so I also purchased Bread by Christine Ingram and Jennie Shapter: the breads of the world and how to bake them at home. (Oh look at that, its the same book TastyBev just posted above my post! Yeah good book!) There's a nice section on glazes and such that I used for finishing touches. This book has an amazing variety of bread recipes, its hard to look through the book without desperately wanting to make about 4-5 of the recipes!

The recipe I used is:

Serene Bread

4 tsp. dry yeast (2 pkgs.) plus 2 tbsp. sugar
1 beaten egg
1/4 cup melted butter
1 1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup sugar (or part sugar, part honey)
4 cups whole wheat flour & 4 cups white flour

{I substituted whole spelt flour and white spelt flour for the wheat flour, and I added in something like a 1/2 cup of hemp seeds and maybe a 1/4 cup dill weed.}

Dissolve yeast and sugar in 1/2 cup lukewarm water. Beat together the egg, butter, 2 1/2 cups lukewarm water, salt, and sugar. Combine with yeast mixture. Add flour and stir until a stiff dough results. Turn onto a floured board. Knead for 10 minutes. Place in an oiled bowl, cover with a towel, and let rise until doubled in bulk. Punch down and divide dough into three balls. Shape loaves to fit in 5 x 9 loaf pans. Let rise again until doubled in bulk. Place in cold oven. Bake at 400° for 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 350°, baking 25 minutes longer. Makes 3 loaves at approximately 2 cents a slice.


I added a glazing and topping, using the Bread book as reference to give my bread a unique finishing touch. According to the book:

Glazing
Glazing has two important functions: it gives an attractive finish to the laof and it introduces moisture during cooking. This moisture produces steam which also helps to expand the gases in the loaf and ensures it cooks through completely. Glazes also change the consistency and taste of the crust. Bread can be glazed before, during or just after baking: sometimes all three. All kinds of things can be used for glazes: egg yolk, egg white, milk, butter, sugar solutions, salt solutions, and olive oil are all regularly used. They also help the toppings to stick to the surface of the loaf.

Toppings
There are as many toppings as there are glazes, if not more, all of which add to the appearance, taste and texture of your finished bread. The dough can be rolled in a topping before the second rising, or it can be glazed and sprinkled with the topping just before baking. Try poppy seeds, grated cheese, caraway seeds, oats, cracked wheat, sea salt, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, herbs, cornmeal or wheat flakes as alternative toppings.


So I didn't write anything down, but I'm pretty sure I made the glaze out of just butter, and mixed in some poppy seeds and dill weed, and brushed it on during or just before baking.

I also have been known to add a couple large drips of honey oil to the mix when mixing up the egg, butter, water, sugar, and salt. Not too much, just enough to make anyone who eats a piece smile and say "This is really good bread:teeth:" But really, I used such a small amount of oil, which was spread throughout the three loaves, I doubt it was much of a factor, especially since it'd take a few minutes for the THC to kick in, and the complements were immediately forthcoming upon test subject's first tasting of the bread. Its probably also relevant that I had chickens at the time, and used very fresh eggs. Backyard chickens that get a varied diet of grass and other plants, bugs, etc are distinctly a step above any store bought egg in flavor, nutritional quality, firm yolk and white, etc.

#16 TastyBeverage

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 10:26 AM

Spelt is a hybrid species of wheat crossed with a wild grass. It has a moderate amount of gluten in it, but it is not gluten free. If it were, you would need to add protein binders and other things to the flour mix in order to make good bread. Too bad, i hear spelt bread is pretty good. I wish i'd tried it back before i was diagnosed.

Celiac patients are sensitive enough to wheat that most of us can't even drink alcohol that has been distilled from grain. (Gluten is present in wheat, barley and rye.)

OK, sorry to go :offtopic:

#17 Beast

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 12:32 PM

Ah good to know. Yeah I think that's probably what my friend has, he gets rashes all over just from drinking a beer.

#18 TastyBeverage

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 01:01 PM

There are some pretty fair gluten free beers on the market now... one is actually made by Anheuser-Busch and is called Redbridge. It's not bad, but i've never been a beer connoisseur. Something is better than nothing or getting a rash though. That's probably the brand that's easiest to find, but there's a big long list of gluten free beers at this site:

http://www.bellaonli...es/art30583.asp

Otherwise tell your friend to cut out wheat, barley and rye and see if all the rashes go away. If they do, he probably has celiacs and should stick to the gluten free diet. Otherwise, somewhere down the road his colon will stop working.

#19 Beast

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 01:19 PM

Yikes, colons are pretty important for preceding lists and explanations...

I'm pretty sure that's what he's doing, if only by default.

You know there is an alternative to icky beer, and that is mead, no grain involved whatsoever....:amazed:

#20 Hippie3

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 02:22 PM

anyway
back on my topic
for those of us with ordinary colons-
poppy seed bread
===================

Rated: 4 out of 5 by 2 members Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 40 Minutes Ready In: 3 Hours
Yields: 24 servings "This yeast bread features a honeyed poppy seed filling deliciously supplemented with nuts and lemon zest."
INGREDIENTS:
5 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 (.25 ounce) packages active
dry yeast
1 1/2 cups milk
1/3 cup white sugar
1/3 cup shortening
1 teaspoon salt
3 eggs
1 cup boiling water
3/4 cup poppy seeds
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup honey
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1 egg white
DIRECTIONS:
1. In a saucepan, heat together milk, sugar, shortening, and salt until warm. 2. Combine 2 cups of the flour and the yeast in a large mixing bowl. Stir in warm milk mixture. Add 3 eggs; beat with an electric mixer at low speed for 1/2 min, scraping sides of bowl constantly. Beat for 3 minutes at high speed. Stir in as much of remaining flour as you can. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead in remaining flour to make a stiff dough, and continue kneading for 6 to 8 minutes. Place dough in a lightly greased bowl, and turn once to grease surface. Cover, and let rise in a warm place until doubled. 3. Meanwhile, pour boiling water over poppy seeds; let stand 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, and place in a blender. Grind. In a small bowl, blend together ground poppy seeds, chopped nuts, honey, and lemon zest. Beat 1 egg white until stiff, and fold into poppy seed mixture. 4. Punch down dough, and divide in half. Cover, and let rest for 10 minutes. On a lightly floured surface, roll half of the dough into 24 x 8 inch rectangle. Spread with half the poppy seed mixture. Roll up jelly roll style, starting with the narrow edge. Seal the edge. Place seam side down, in a greased 8 x 4 inch loaf pan. Repeat with the other half of the dough. Cover. Let rise for 30 to 45 minutes, or until doubled. 5. Bake in a preheated 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) oven for 35 to 40 minutes.




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