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Upcoming celestial & astronomical events


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#41 Ras Asad

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 06:16 PM

Tonight~ ( 9 p.m.)
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#42 Ras Asad

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 07:22 PM

ohhh, its gettin pretty!!!

get out there kids!! lol

#43 PsychoDrogue

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 07:40 PM

very cool. that system next to the moon will look great. i noticed the crescent the other night but venus was miles away. i love seeing things nestled up close like that, especially in phases.

I will also be looking for mercury. Don't believe i've managed to find it before.

#44 Doctor D

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 07:42 PM

:thumbup: Thanks guys! I see the moon and Mercury, but unfortunately there's no Pleiades.

#45 Ras Asad

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 08:02 PM

yeah bro, pleiades are blocked out by light pollution here,
i just talked to my dad tho, and out at his house in the country he can see them.

i need to move back to the country... lol

#46 funguyonfungi

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 06:02 AM

As a fellow star gazer i have to say this is a great thread!!!:eusa_clap

#47 chimp

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 04:10 PM

The morning of May 6th right before the sun come sup is supposed to be the best.

Those in the southern hemisphere will get the best show.up to 85 meteors per hour..the poor saps like me that live in the USA will only get 20-30 per hour.

http://spaceweather....6idovmb3i7j44a0
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#48 Doctor D

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 04:06 AM

June bump. No known phenomena to be reported by me at this time - anyone else? Chip, that spaceweather.com website is fantastic. Thanks! :bow:

#49 Ras Asad

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 01:42 PM

I gotchu....

(original link in heart at bottom)

What’s Up This Month - June 2009

June 2, 2009

As June arrives, the galaxy fields of spring slowly give way to the beautiful overhead arc of the Milky Way. On June 6, a nearly-full Moon passes in front of a bright red supergiant star in Scorpius. All planets are visible this month, though only Saturn is found in the evening sky.

For observers in the northern hemisphere, the sun lies high in the sky during the day and not far below the horizon at night, which makes for long twilight and short nights. Summer arrives at 5:46 GMT on June 21. But the days now– slowly at first– start getting shorter. (Of course, it’s the other way around for observers in the southern hemisphere).

Life is busy, I know. But try to get out to enjoy a few moments of stargazing. Let a few rays of ancient starlight strike your eye and incite your imagination.

Celestial Events in June

Moon occults Antares
. In the evening of June 6, in the Caribbean, northern parts of Latin America, and all but northeastern and far western North America, the nearly-full Moon occults the bright supergiant star Antares in Scorpius. It should be quite a show. This month, you can see the dramatic rise of Scorpius in the late evening as it lurches over the south-eastern horizon, claws first, looking for its prey.

Io and Ganymede cast shadows simultaneously on the face of Jupiter from 8:06 to 10:16 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) on June 9. A small telescope at 100x or more should give you a good view. Click here to translate Greenwich Mean Time to the time in your area. The event will look a little like this… iNyrNeyNPVk



Pluto lies directly opposite the Sun this month in northern Sagittarius. At 14th magnitude, it lies beyond the sight of all but the most determined stargazers.
Moon and Planets

The Moon.
Full on June 7; new again on June 22. On June 19, as a thin waning crescent, the Moon is just 6-7 degrees above Venus and Mars in the pre-dawn sky.

Venus. The beautiful planet wheels away from the Earth and dims slightly in the morning sky. On June 6, the Sun illuminates only half of the face of Venus as seen from the Earth.

Mars.
Lies about 10 degrees above the eastern horizon early in the month, rising a little higher towards the end.

Saturn follows Leo into the southwest after sunset. But it’s still putting on a good show. The rings tilt just 3 degrees from edge on. Regulus lies west of Saturn and Spica lies further east. Saturn is the one that doesn’t twinkle.

Jupiter.
The king of planets lies in eastern Capricorn, low in the sky for northern observers again this year. Observe it carefully on nights with steady seeing, when the image of the planet doesn’t seem to “boil” in your field of view. As mentioned above, in a telescope, you can see a double shadow on the planet on the morning of June 9.

Neptune. Fairly dim at 8th magnitude. Even a good-sized telescope will struggle to show Neptune’s disk, which is only 2.3″ across. But the outer planet is less than 0.5 degrees from Jupiter all month, so you can see them in a single low-power field of view.

Uranus
rises a couple hours after midnight. It’s in Pisces, near the “circlet” of stars that makes up the head of the western “fish”. It’s visible in a telescope before the sun rises.

Deep-Sky Sights


The fine double star Izar (epsilon Bootis) is well worth a look. Separated by just 3″, you’ll need decent seeing and a magnification of 100x or so to resolve the pair. The reward for your effort is the sight of a splendid contrast of color and brightness. The brighter star has exhausted its fuel and become a bright red-orange giant; the fainter is a bright white main sequence star which still burns hydrogen in its core. The pair lies about 200 light years away and takes more than 1,000 years to revolve around each other.
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the double star Izar (left center) in the constellation Bootes

For southern observers, try Acrux (alpha Crucis), the magnificent double star at the foot of the Southern Cross. Acrux is actually a triple. The main pair, stars A and B, are brilliant blue-white, and separated by 4″. C is nearly 5th magnitude some 90″ away. The widely separated A and C components are visible in 10×50 binoculars, and a 3-inch scope shows the A-B pairing at 70x or more.

And finally, June’s Astronomy Haiku…

Darkness falls later,
Testing stargazers’ patience:
The summer solstice


<3
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#50 feralronin

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 02:15 PM

"Life is busy, I know. But try to get out to enjoy a few moments of stargazing. Let a few rays of ancient starlight strike your eye and incite your imagination."

Hell yeah man. That's what I'm talking about. Gonna make this happen this weekend. Thanks for all the info everyone.

#51 Jose_sixpac

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 05:51 PM

Great thread, i like the shot of Comet Lulin.


Good read I look forward to spying the Zodiacal light for the first time.

We will be outside most of next month up in NW NY, Ill keep an eye peeled, can't wait for the new Hubble data in Sept maybe?
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#52 eatyualive

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Posted 20 July 2009 - 08:40 PM

new moon landing shots.

http://wechoosethemoon.org/#

sites a little slow. but once you get to where it stops. click on the highlighted button for photo gallery. some really amazing shots.

#53 chimp

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 09:40 AM

http://science.nasa.....htm?list967226

The peak won't be until 8-11-12 but it has already begun.

#54 pharmer

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 11:29 AM

perseid meteor showers will peak August 12th

#55 Beast

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 07:49 PM

BUMP for the Perseids :headbang:

#56 chimp

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 08:01 PM

Overcast here :gah:

#57 Doctor D

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 08:09 PM

Cloudy here! :(

#58 Jose_sixpac

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 08:25 PM

here too, no clearing untill the weekend.
:thumbdown:

#59 Scratch

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 11:05 PM

I just got in an hour of observing.

Saw two long, bright, earth grazers and one
short flash.

The clouds just rolled in so that's it for now.

#60 Scratch

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 03:56 AM

Pretty good show out there right now.
Counted 15 in the last hour.
2 of those were bright enough to leave
a smoke trail in the sky.




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