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Upcoming celestial & astronomical events


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#701 Dipole

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 03:51 PM

Well I am bummed.

The detection and observation of a neutron star binary merger

showed that gravity waves and the speed of light

travel at the same speed.

It also generates a good deal of gold, platinum, uranium, and yes even plutonium.

The bad news is that this confirms the prediction that

neutron star mergers are the only process that can efficiently produce

the heavy elements.

 

That means that gold and platinum is rare throughout the universe.

 

However,  we might one day locate an old, nearby neutron star with a cloud of gold and platinum around it.

We can mine for helium 3 on the Moon,

we can collect diamonds on Saturn,

we can scoop up heavy metals by a neutron star.

Maybe we can do something stupid on Mars too.

 

Getting diamonds from Saturn can be difficult because of the gravity.

Also, the Saturians might require a trade agreement.

If that should be the case, dumping Plutonium in their backyard

might be the biggest mistake mankind ever made.

 

Space is going to be a bitch.



#702 Alder Logs

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 12:30 AM

Leonid meteors tonight.

 

Went out to piss and saw two, heading south.  Sky is not totally clear.  Forecast says mostly cloudy.



#703 Alder Logs

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 10:25 AM

Woke up at 2:00 and the sky was mostly clear.   Watched for a while and saw no meteors.   Was I told the wrong night?



#704 Soliver

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 03:21 PM

Next time leave the light off.  It's uncomfortable enough trying to get some decent sleep under your bed here without having to listen to you bitch over the Leonids at 2am.

 

:)

 

soliver


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#705 Cuboid

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 04:43 PM

Supermoon next w/e :)

#706 pharmer

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Posted 26 November 2017 - 10:10 PM

he's deviant, you know?

 

three posts today, the first since Jan '08

 

could be a comeback!


Edited by pharmer, 26 November 2017 - 10:12 PM.

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#707 Soliver

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 04:21 PM

he's deviant, you know?

 

three posts today, the first since Jan '08

 

could be a comeback!

 

Nah, it hasn't been THAT long - I think it's been a few years tops ....

 

Responsibilities have a habit of getting in the way of what's truly important sometimes.

 

Besides, I'm guessing no one else around here has broached the topic of eating Alder Logs for brunch, and I'd hate for the old man to hobble around not-feeling delicious.  I think of it as a community service?

 

:)

 

soliver


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#708 Skywatcher

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 10:31 AM

The December full moon on the 3rd is the first of 3 supermoons. As an added treat, the January 31 full moon is also a blue moon (2nd in the same month), and will feature a total lunar eclipse in the western north america, and a partial on the east coast .

 

Maps and details are here:

https://www.timeandd...2018-january-31

 

Use the interactive search for specific times and percents in your area.


Edited by Skywatcher, 03 December 2017 - 10:33 AM.

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#709 Alder Logs

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 11:33 AM

John Hogue, astrologer, Nostradamus scholar, and predictor of some note in his own right, has made some observations of volcanism, earthquake and tsunami patterns in the paths of past total solar eclipses after these have occurred.    For some reason, the coming super moons have been giving me concerns in that I sit atop the Cascadia Subduction Zone here.  But, he also notes that the recent eclipse path also included the Yellowstone Super-Volcano, the New Madrid Fault, and the Helena Banks Fault in South Carolina, and that any of these could be in line for coming seismicity over the next few years. 

 

[Direct Link]

 

On edit:

 

 

As an added treat...

 

It's curious that I read that as, "As an added threat..."  

 

BTW, I found the whole hour and a half video extremely interesting.


Edited by Alder Logs, 03 December 2017 - 01:49 PM.


#710 Soliver

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 03:54 PM

The moon last night was absolutely mesmerizing ... I laid in wait for some deer to invade the property but had no luck - they're smarter than me (not a giant leap) before tucking the rifle away and just basking in the lunar glow.  Under a few layers of wool blanket and on top of the old lady's yoga mat.  With a cold beverage and a purloined couch pillow.  Beyond hope and under the influence. 

 

It's a good damn thing that orb doesn't float there on a regular basis, else I'd never make it into work (in a functional condition).

 

Every time a "super moon" comes around, I get the same bogus email chain from my ancient father about how the moon will look like the death star, etc., etc...  I'm not sure what a super moon is ... I guess I could look into it, but ... I prefer at times to wrap myself in ignorance like a thick dark woolen cloak.

 

What Would Nostradamus Do?  (WWND) ...

 

:)

 

soliver


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#711 Alder Logs

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 04:21 PM

With as many as twenty deer in my yard at any given moment, perhaps you won't still be hungry, or have the freezer space, by the time you reach my cabin. 

 

Also, I am armed, and though a vegetarian, I have a better compost shredder than this guy.

 

fargo-wood-chipper-scene.jpg


Edited by Alder Logs, 03 December 2017 - 04:30 PM.


#712 Skywatcher

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 05:15 PM

The moon last night was absolutely mesmerizing ...  I'm not sure what a super moon is ... I guess I could look into it, but ... I prefer at times to wrap myself in ignorance like a thick dark woolen cloak.

 

What Would Nostradamus Do?  (WWND) ...

 

:)

 

soliver

Sorry soliver, I can't seem to leave well enough alone. A supermoon was not really mentioned until recent years, but the opposite is a micromoon, and although this happens just as often, It does not sound very exciting so we don't seem to get the hype on those.

 

Any full moon is mesmerizing to me, and draws my attention without fail.

 

So here's the definition of a "supermoon"

 

supermoon is a full moon or a new moon that approximately coincides with the closest distance that the Moon reaches to Earth in its elliptic orbit, resulting in a larger-than-usual apparent size of the lunar disk as seen from Earth.The technical name is the perigee syzygy of the Earth–Moon–Sun system. The term supermoon is not astronomical, but originated in modern astrology. The association of the Moon with both oceanic and crustal tides has led to claims that the supermoon phenomenon may be associated with increased risk of events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, but there is no evidence of such a link

The opposite phenomenon, an apogee syzygy, has been called a micromoon, though this term is not as widespread as supermoon.

The most recent supermoon occurrence was on December 3, 2017 The one on November 14, 2016 was the closest supermoon since January 26, 1948, and will not be surpassed until November 25, 2034. The closest supermoon of the century will occur on December 6, 2052.

Occasionally, a supermoon coincides with a total lunar eclipse. The most recent occurrence of this was in September 2015, while the next one will be in October 2033.

 

Distance

220px-Supermoon_comparison.jpg
 
The supermoon of March 19, 2011 (right), compared to a more average moon of December 20, 2010 (left), as viewed from Earth

The Moon's distance varies each month between approximately 357,000 and 406,000 kilometers (222,000 and 252,000 mi) because of its elliptical orbit around the Earth(distances given are centre-to-centre).

A full moon at perigee is visually larger up to 14% in diameter than at apogee. While the moon's surface luminance remains the same, because of its larger size the illuminance is up to 30% brighter than one at its farthest point, or apogee. While a typical summer full moon at temperate latitudes provides only about 0.05-0.1 lux, a supermoon directly overhead in the tropics could provide up to 0.36 lux.

Terminology

 
220px-Super_Moon_11-15-2016.jpg
 
The supermoon over the Dutch Caribbean, 50 miles (80 km) north of Venezuela, November 15, 2016

The name supermoon was coined by astrologer Richard Nolle in 1979

Nolle also claimed that the moon causes "geophysical stress" during the time of a supermoon. Nolle never outlined why he chose 90%.

 

... a new or full moon which occurs with the Moon at or near (within 90% of) its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit (perigee). In short, Earth, Moon and Sun are all in a line, with Moon in its nearest approach to Earth.


The term perigee-syzygy or perigee full/new moon is preferred in the scientific community. Perigee is the point at which the Moon is closest in its orbit to the Earth, and syzygyis when the Earth, the Moon and the Sun are aligned, which happens at every full or new moon. Hence, a supermoon can be regarded as a combination of the two, although they do not perfectly coincide each time.

800px-Moon_distance_with_full_%26_new.pn
 
Supermoons will be the marked points nearest the bottom of the graph.

FrequencyBecause synodic and anomalistic months differ by almost two days, perigee and full moon alignments will drift relative to one another. The beat period between the two is about 13.9443 synodic months (about 411.8 days). Thus approximately every 14th full moon will be a supermoon. However, halfway through the cycle the full moon will be close to apogee, and the new moons immediately before and after can be supermoons. Depending on the interpretation of the definition there may be between three and six supermoons per cycle.

Since 13.9443 differs from 14 by very close to  118, the supermoons themselves will vary with a period of about 18 cycles (about 251 synodic months or 20.3 years). Thus for about a decade the largest supermoons will be full, and for the next decade the largest supermoons will be new.

Effect on tides

The combined effect of the Sun and Moon on the Earth's oceans, the tide, is greatest when the Moon is either new or full. At a lunar perigee, the tidal force is somewhat stronger, resulting in perigean spring tides. But, even at its most powerful, this force is still relatively weak, causing tidal differences of inches at most.

As the tidal force follows an inverse-cube law, that force is 19% greater than average. However, because the actual amplitude of tides varies around the world, this may not translate into a direct effect.

Natural disasters

No evidence has been found of any correlation between supermoons with major earthquakes. Regardless of the evidence, there has been media speculation that natural disasters, such as the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami and the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, are causally linked with the 1–2 week period surrounding a supermoon. A large, 7.5 magnitude earthquake centred 15 km north-east of Culverden, New Zealand at 00:03 NZDT on November 14, 2016, also coincided with a supermoon.


Edited by Skywatcher, 03 December 2017 - 05:18 PM.

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#713 Soliver

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Posted 03 December 2017 - 05:44 PM

Fuck YOU Skywatcher ... you MADE me LEARN something ... and on the SABBATH of all times!  Egads!  Now I'm gonna have to sacrifice, like ... another chicken or my first-born son or something.  Dammit!

 

I just want to say "perigee syzygy" over and over again now.  While choking this chicken.  On a super moon.  On the Sabbath.  Ooh.  Yeah.  Perigee Syzygy .... Perigee Syzygy .... and - shit.  Nope.  Lost it.  Oven timer went off.  Hate it when that happens. 

 

It seems I'm seeing the phrase "regardless of the evidence" a lot more these days, as we're a society that seems more and more to run on what we're feeling might / should be true.  It's weird, yet oddly comforting, as I'm feeling like a teaspoon of kratom washed down with an inexpensive can of domestic swill will probably neutralize the rogue cells that I feel are probably metastacizing throughout my body as a result of the radiation I absorbed from last night's full moon, which - per a video I saw online - produces its own light.  And the Earth is flat.  I feel.  And I feel like USAirways is spreading aluminum nanoparticles throughout the atmosphere in chemtrails.  I can feel them.  Even through this foil-lined hat.

 

But seriously - thanks for the mooninfo.  Something every day.  And who can believe Americans don't have a catchy term for the smallest moons?  You should get one going, like ... SubMoon?  MicroMoon?  Hmmm ....

 

I just went out to take a leak and there's a frakin' deer colony out there.  Probably came down from Alder's place. 

 

:)

 

soliver


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#714 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 05 December 2017 - 05:38 PM

Soliver!

I thought you were dead... Again.

Glad to see that ain't true, even if you are a pain in the ass!
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#715 Soliver

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 03:54 PM

Soliver!

I thought you were dead... Again.

Glad to see that ain't true, even if you are a pain in the ass!

 

I'm like those genital lice you just can't get rid of no matter how many times you scald your groin and anus with scalding water ...

 

The funny thing is that I sorta figured soliver was dead ... again as well, but every time I contemplate restocking the anxiety closet, I end up coming around here to see if there's any new awesome tricks I'm missing out on.  So far no magic 'easy' bullet, which suits me fine.  My myco knowledge is still useful, unlike my double majors in communications and art history from 1984 ...

 

:)

 

soliver


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#716 Alder Logs

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 04:11 PM

There has to be a better venue for discussing crotch crickets.


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#717 Soliver

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 04:23 PM

There has to be a better venue for discussing crotch crickets.

 

I can be at your door in under two minutes, unless one of these harness buckles has rusted shut again.  Thanks in advance for emptying my pickle jar?

 

:)

 

soliver



#718 FluffyPowerSmurf

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 01:09 AM

 

Soliver!

I thought you were dead... Again.

Glad to see that ain't true, even if you are a pain in the ass!

 

I'm like those genital lice you just can't get rid of no matter how many times you scald your groin and anus with scalding water ...

 

The funny thing is that I sorta figured soliver was dead ... again as well, but every time I contemplate restocking the anxiety closet, I end up coming around here to see if there's any new awesome tricks I'm missing out on.  So far no magic 'easy' bullet, which suits me fine.  My myco knowledge is still useful, unlike my double majors in communications and art history from 1984 ...

 

:)

 

soliver

 

I've never had crotch crickets but I'm pretty sure there's an easier way to get rid of them than that.  I mean scalding water on the groin and anus... I call that having a good time.  but to get rid of the bugs requires olive oil... and that's just a +++ addition to the fun.



#719 Alder Logs

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 11:57 PM

I heard in the navy that the way to kill the crabs is to shave a strip from the middle of your pubes and light one side on fire and stab them with an icepick when they try to run across the gap. 

 

Oh, and I did see a couple of meteors a couple nights back. 






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