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Upcoming celestial & astronomical events


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#801 Dipole

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 11:24 PM

I have been trying to witness a ULA launch of a spy satellite out of Vandenburg. 

4 scrubbs as of tonight.  Too bad, the sky was clear. 

I am hoping to watch the launch online then step outside and watch the fireball.  Better luck tomorrow.

Its a Delta IV Heavy.  It is a big sucker.


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#802 Skywatcher

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 09:53 PM

I have been trying to witness a ULA launch of a spy satellite out of Vandenburg. 

4 scrubbs as of tonight.

5 scrubs as of tonight..............

Last word is they are putting this on hold until the 30th. Maybe its so top secret they are doing this intentionally, hoping we all get bored with trying to watch, so it can do its thing unobserved...........................LOL

 

Maybe lucky try number 6 ?


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#803 PJammer24

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Posted 21 December 2018 - 10:29 AM

No meteors made it below the cloud cover that I know of.

 

There were quite a few visible from where I was... My buddy, a city slicker, was fascinated and stayed out there for hours.


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#804 Dipole

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Posted 22 December 2018 - 11:16 AM

SpaceX scrubbed today too.  I want to watch a rocket launch and all I get is scrub, scrub, scrub.

Well wanting might be more fun than having.

 

On a brighter note, I did see a nice meteor 2 nights ago.  I got lucky that time.


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#805 Skywatcher

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 06:58 PM

5 Don't miss astronomical events for 2019

(pictures were deleted)

 

The new year will bring several notable astronomy events that will be visible for many across the United States, including a rare celestial alignment that won't happen again until the 2030s.

In addition to these big events, 2019 will also feature three supermoons, a blue moon, multiple meteor showers and dozens of rocket launches from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Here are the top five astronomy events of 2019 to mark on your calendar:

 

Jan. 20-21: Super blood moon eclipse to glow red over United States

 

The most-viewed astronomy event of the year will take place in the middle of January as the moon turns red during a total lunar eclipse.

This will be the only total lunar eclipse of the year and it will be visible in the skies of all of North America and South America, as well as part of Europe and Africa, on the night of Jan. 20 into the early hours of Jan. 21.

As the moon passes through the Earth's shadow, it will gradually turn rusty orange to deep red in color, earning it the nickname of a ‘blood moon.' The entire eclipse, including the partial phases, will last between 9:36 p.m. EST and 2:48 a.m. EST. However, the total phase when the moon will appear red will only last a little over an hour, between 11:41 p.m. EST and 12:43 a.m. EST.

This will be the last total lunar eclipse visible anywhere in the world until May 26, 2021.

 

 

May 6-7: Halley's Comet to spark Eta Aquarids meteor shower

 

One of 2019's best meteor showers is set to peak this spring as the Eta Aquarids dazzle onlookers around the globe.

"Each spring as Earth passes through the debris trail from Halley's Comet (1P/Halley), the cosmic bits burn up in our atmosphere and result in the annual Eta Aquarid meteor shower,"

This meteor shower favors the Southern Hemisphere with up to 60 meteors per hour, but those in the Northern Hemisphere can still see up to 30 meteors per hour at its peak.

While other meteor showers, such as December's Geminids, bring many more meteors per hour, the Eta Aquarids will be one of the few showers this year that falls during the new moon.

Meteor showers are best viewed during a new moon due to the low amount of natural light pollution. This makes it easier to see dimmer meteors that would not be able to be seen during a bright full moon.

"Eta Aquarid meteors are known for their speed. These meteors are fast-traveling at about 148,000 mph (66 km/s) into Earth's atmosphere. Fast meteors can leave glowing "trains" (incandescent bits of debris in the wake of the meteor) which last for several seconds to minutes," 

 

 

 

July 2: Total solar eclipse darkens sky over South America

 

The first total solar eclipse since 2017's Great American Eclipse will take place this July, causing day to turn to night across part of South America.

Most of the eclipse will take place over the unoccupied waters of the Pacific Ocean; however, it will be visible across a sliver of Chile and Argentina.

In this small area, called the path of totality, the moon will completely block out the sun. The rest of South America can expect a partial solar eclipse. The next total solar eclipse will not happen until Dec. 14, 2020, but will also be visible in parts of Chile and Argentina.

 

Aug. 12-13: Perseids to impress summer stargazers

 

Every year, stargazers mark the Perseid meteor shower on their calendars, which peaks this year on the night of Aug. 12 into the early morning of Aug. 13.

"The Perseid meteor shower is often considered to be one of the best meteor showers of the year due to its high rates and pleasant late-summer temperatures,".

This year won't be the best showing for the Perseids as it falls right before the full moon; however, meteors associated with the Perseids are usually brighter than meteors from other meteor showers. This means that even with the light of the nearly full moon, onlookers should still be able to see plenty of shooting stars.

"You don't need any special equipment to view the Perseids - just your eyes (note that telescopes or binoculars are not recommended)," 

 

Nov. 11: Mercury to track across the face of the Sun

 

A rare planetary alignment will take place on Nov. 11 and will be visible across much of the world, but only to those with the proper equipment.

Mercury is typically a difficult planet to find in the sky due to its close proximity to the sun, but in November, it will pass directly between the Earth and the Sun, appearing as a small black dot on the Sun's surface.

This event, known as a transit, does not happen often. Most recently, a transit of Mercury occurred on May 9, 2016, and it will not happen again until Nov. 13, 2032.

It is extremely important that people use a solar filter to look at the Sun to see this transit, as looking at the Sun without proper protection can cause permanent eye damage.

People with solar filter glasses leftover from the Great American Eclipse in 2017 can use them to see this rare event, but only if they have not been damaged.

"If the filters aren't scratched, punctured, or torn, you may reuse them indefinitely. Some glasses/viewers are printed with warnings stating that you shouldn't look through them for more than 3 minutes at a time and that you should discard them if they are more than three years old. Such warnings are outdated and do not apply to eclipse viewers compliant with the ISO 12312-2 standard adopted in 2015," NASA said.

 


Edited by Skywatcher, 26 December 2018 - 07:07 PM.

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#806 Skywatcher

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 10:03 PM

Just a reminder................

 

eclipse-lunar-1-31-2018-Eliot-Herman-Tuc

 

 

The total lunar eclipse will land on a supermoon, The night of January 20th into the morning of January 21stand be visible throughout the north and south american continents. This is also the only total lunar eclipse in 2019. Full details and maps are here:

 

https://earthsky.org...e-january-20-21

 

Visibility_Lunar_Eclipse_2019-01-21-800x


Edited by Skywatcher, 06 January 2019 - 10:07 PM.

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#807 wildedibles

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 03:03 PM

I heard of a good night for a meator shower but cannot remember the date did I miss it??
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#808 Alder Logs

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 04:19 PM

Interesting that it looks like the moon will be directly above Cuba at maximum.


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#809 Skywatcher

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 06:42 PM

I heard of a good night for a meteor shower but cannot remember the date did I miss it??

Here is a simple calendar for all the showers in 2019. These rarely vary from year to year. Also handy because it tells the expected amount of meteors per hour (approximate of course), so you can see which ones will be the better shows.

 

Principal Meteor Showers

SHOWER

BEST VIEWING

POINTOFORIGIN

DATE OF MAXIMUM*

NO. PER HOUR**

ASSOCIATED COMET

Quadrantid

Predawn

N

Jan. 4

25

Lyrid

Predawn

S

Apr. 22

10

Thatcher

Eta Aquarid

Predawn

SE

May 4

10

Halley

Delta Aquarid

Predawn

S

July 30

10

Perseid

Predawn

NE

Aug. 11–13

50

Swift-Tuttle

Draconid

Late evening

NW

Oct. 9

6

Giacobini-Zinner

Orionid

Predawn

S

Oct. 21–22

15

Halley

Taurid

Late evening

S

Nov. 9

3

Encke

Leonid

Predawn

S

Nov. 17–18

10

Tempel-Tuttle

Andromedid

Late evening

S

Nov. 25–27

5

Biela

Geminid

All night

NE

Dec. 13–14

75

Ursid

Predawn

N

Dec. 22

5

Tuttle

*May vary by one or two days    **Moonless, rural sky    Bold = most prominent

  • “Predawn” means an hour or so before morning twilight. Best time to view most major showers.
  • “Late evening” means approximately between 10 p.m. and midnight (or a little past).

In general, most major meteor showers are best seen after midnight; some do not even appear until after then. Usually, a better time to see them is after 2 a.m., and the best time is about an hour or so just before morning twilight. Geminids, however, can be seen starting earlier, such as around 9 or 10 p.m., until morning twilight. Sometimes Draconids may be visible at nightfall through early evening.

 

​Also an interesting distance fact regarding the lunar eclipse...

​The duration from the center position (over Cuba), compared to some of the outer positions ,such as Alaska or Great Britain, will only amount to a difference of minutes being that the moon is between

225,623 and 252,623 miles overhead. Said another way, you could put 30 earths between the earth and the moon.

 

We are actually more like a double planet, than most of the other planet/moon systems in this solar system.


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#810 Dipole

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 10:37 PM

I hope we have a break in the So.Cal. rain so I can see totality!

Great postings Skywatcher.


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#811 Skywatcher

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 10:39 AM

I hope we have a break in the So.Cal. rain so I can see totality!

Great postings Skywatcher.

Yes, agreed Dipole. My best sources now see the rain passing on Friday, with cold clear sky for Sunday night and Monday Morning.

It's not going to be tee shirt and bermuda weather, so bundle up !

 

Juthro may need heated goggles so his eyeballs don't freeze.....................


Edited by Skywatcher, 13 January 2019 - 10:42 AM.

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#812 Alder Logs

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 11:39 AM

I couldn't read that calendar so I am trying to clean it up for the black background.  

 

===============

 

Here is a simple calendar for all the showers in 2019. These rarely vary from year to year. Also handy because it tells the expected amount of meteors per hour (approximate of course), so you can see which ones will be the better shows.

 

Principal Meteor Showers

 

SHOWER - BEST VIEWING - POINT OF ORIGIN - DATE OF MAXIMUM* - NO. PER HOUR** - ASSOCIATED COMET 

 

 

Lyrid     -  Predawn    -           S              -        Apr. 22          -         10            -       Thatcher

 

Eta Aquarid - Predawn -    SE             -         May 4           -         10             -        Halley

 

Delta Aquarid - Predawn -  S              -        July 30          -          10           -          

 

Perseid      -    Predawn - NE           -     Aug. 11–13    -          50         -         Swift-Tuttle

 

Draconid  -  Late evening - NW        -          Oct. 9          -           6          -       Giacobini-Zinner

 

Orionid    -     Predawn    -   S          -       Oct. 21–22      -         15         -            Halley

 

Taurid   -   Late evening  -   S         -          Nov. 9          -           3           -           Encke

 

Leonid  -      Predawn     -    S         -       Nov. 17–18    -          10         -       Tempel-Tuttle

 

Andromedid - Late evening - S     -       Nov. 25–27    -           5           -             Biela

 

Geminid   -     All night    -   NE    -       Dec. 13–14     -         75          -            

 

Ursid     -      Predawn    -     N       -           Dec. 22        -           5           -            Tuttle

 

 

 

*May vary by one or two days    **Moonless, rural sky    Bold = most prominent

  • “Predawn” means an hour or so before morning twilight. Best time to view most major showers.
  • “Late evening” means approximately between 10 p.m. and midnight (or a little past).

In general, most major meteor showers are best seen after midnight; some do not even appear until after then. Usually, a better time to see them is after 2 a.m., and the best time is about an hour or so just before morning twilight. Geminids, however, can be seen starting earlier, such as around 9 or 10 p.m., until morning twilight. Sometimes Draconids may be visible at nightfall through early evening.

 

​Also an interesting distance fact regarding the lunar eclipse...

​The duration from the center position (over Cuba), compared to some of the outer positions ,such as Alaska or Great Britain, will only amount to a difference of minutes being that the moon is between 225,623 and 252,623 miles overhead. Said another way, you could put 30 earths between the earth and the moon.

 

We are actually more like a double planet, than most of the other planet/moon systems in this solar system.


Edited by Alder Logs, 13 January 2019 - 11:41 AM.

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#813 coorsmikey

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Posted 13 January 2019 - 12:25 PM

Since you all are so good at keeping this thread updated and its just so darn cool. https://mycotopia.ne...-events/01-2019


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#814 Myc

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 03:29 PM

https://www.al.com/n...blood_wolf.html

 

This Friday evening on the 20th there will occur a combination of:

Full Moon

"Super Moon" 

and Blood Moon

It is also known as the "wolf moon" because it is the first full moon of the year - occurring in January - and in older times, starving wolves were known to howl from hunger outside of encampments. 

 

The PNW is not expected to have one of the better views but if you're in the southern latitudes toward Mexico the view is expected to be quite clear. 

 

Lunatics unite! I'll be watching with you on Friday evening. 


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#815 Skywatcher

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 04:56 PM

I couldn't read that calendar so I am trying to clean it up for the black background.  

Thank you Alder !

I did not double check that copy/paste until much later, and the option to edit had passed.

 

Your edited version is what I was aiming for....

:biggrin:


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#816 coorsmikey

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 09:25 PM

Since you all are so good at keeping this thread updated and its just so darn cool. https://mycotopia.ne...-events/01-2019

All members in good standing can update the calendar. I encourage y'all to do so. Some groups require moderator approval, but that is just so we don't have rouge disgruntled members using it as a loophole. Please let me know if it needs adjusting? If we update it we can all "Follow" it and get calendar reminders.

You can copy and paste your thread from here or the other way around, add a link to your post here or to the original source. It much like a post but with dates and durations.


Edited by coorsmikey, 15 January 2019 - 09:53 PM.

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#817 Dipole

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 09:33 PM

I think it is cool that the moons of the year have names.  I could ask my wife what the names are in Mandarin Chinese...

Which reminds me. 

 

Xīn Nián Kuài Lè

(shin yen qui la)

 

Chinese New Year starts this coming new moon and goes on to the full moon.

It was once in Taiwan for New Year.

There is always some clown in the neighborhood

who believes that the Gates of Heaven

open at midnight on the new and full moons.

This is a very auspicious moment,

but some seem to think that bad Gods could come out

and give you a bad time, so...

they light off the biggest firecracker made on the island.

Take that bad ass Gods.


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#818 Alder Logs

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 09:44 PM

I think this is my year.  It's the Year of the Pig, right?  Also a Saturn return.


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#819 wildedibles

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 07:08 AM

Ya we keep checking in to see what we should be catching in the sky :) and thanks you guys are all the bomb :)

I would love to know the days like Juthro I need googles on these cool nights but they do make the stars sparkle and the northern lights like it when its cooler too e can see them some nights in the summer but the winter ones are much better brighter more color and longer lasting .... I used to watch them on my lunch when I worked midnights
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#820 mushit

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 04:13 PM

https://www.al.com/n...blood_wolf.html

 

This Friday evening on the 20th there will occur a combination of:

Full Moon

"Super Moon" 

and Blood Moon

It is also known as the "wolf moon" because it is the first full moon of the year - occurring in January - and in older times, starving wolves were known to howl from hunger outside of encampments. 

 

The PNW is not expected to have one of the better views but if you're in the southern latitudes toward Mexico the view is expected to be quite clear. 

 

Lunatics unite! I'll be watching with you on Friday evening. 

I will be out there briefly.  It's supposed to be -20 F Friday night in these parts!!


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