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Upcoming celestial & astronomical events


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#881 Severian

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 08:55 PM

As I often like to say, there are no problems here on Earth that can't be solved with the open ended Richter Scale.

 

 

 

 

heeeheeeeheeee thanks you


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#882 flashingrooster

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Posted 08 September 2019 - 05:39 PM

We need to have so many "game changers" at once that it overwhelms the current monkey brain based idiocy that allows a country to lose 21 trillion dollars, elect an orange turnip as president, arrest those who tell the truth, whilst paying millions to those who lie professionally, and most importantly, the wholesale destruction of the only planet we are aware of, that we can live on.

If that happens, perhaps we can cure all disease, extend life, and explore space.

7 Current Game changers:

1. (Previously mentioned) Proliferation of new private space companies.

2. Artificial Intelligence

3. Quantum Computing

4. Crypto Currency

5. Graphine and exotic materials

6. Nano Machine Technology

7. Man Machine biological interfaces

 

Now we can add human animal hybrids to the list. I remember laughing at Alex Jones when he was taking about chimera's. Oh turns out he was right again, just like the privacy blockbuster. Everyone thought he was crazy when he said we are being listened to on our devices... Its scary what this guy is sometimes right about 



#883 TVCasualty

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Posted 08 September 2019 - 06:12 PM

Alex Jones being correct about something is equivalent to a broken clock being correct twice a day.



#884 flashingrooster

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Posted 08 September 2019 - 07:09 PM

Alex Jones being correct about something is equivalent to a broken clock being correct twice a day.

 

Trust me nobody gets more laughs out of the guy than me


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#885 SteampunkScientist

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 07:53 AM

Alex Jones is a con man who makes his money by calling everyone else.... wait for it.... "con men" (or con women, or con-<insert preferred gender here>)



#886 Skywatcher

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 04:30 PM

The Orionid meteor shower is coming Monday night !

Halley’s Comet won’t be visible from Earth for another 42 years but you can see pieces of Halley’s Comet over the next two nights as a part of the Orionid Meteor Shower, which is set to peak on October 21 and 22.
Keep your eyes to the night sky late Monday night and especially early Tuesday morning – you might get a peek at the Orionid meteor shower.
“I would rank the Orionids in the top five meteor showers of the year,” AccuWeather astronomy blogger Dave Samuhel said. ”It will be the strongest shower since the Perseids of August ... The Orionids provide 20 to 25 meteors per hour on the peak night."
Orionid meteors are debris left behind by Halley's Comet, arguably the most famous of all comets, according to Deborah Byrd of EarthSky.org. "This comet leaves debris in its wake that strikes Earth’s atmosphere most fully around Oct. 20-22, while Earth intersects the comet’s orbit, as it does every year at this time," Byrd said.

SOURCE earthsky.org

The Orionids are some of the fastest and brightest among meteor showers because the Earth is hitting the stream of particles almost head-on, according to Space.com. How fast? Most zip by at 41 miles per second, which translates to about 148,000 mph.

If the meteors originate from Halley's, why are they called the Orionids?

"Meteors in annual showers are named for the point in our sky from which they appear to radiate," according to Byrd. "The radiant point for the Orionids is in the direction of the famous constellation Orion the Hunter."

 

post-126525-0-12804700-1571693352.png

To view the shower, try to avoid light pollution and don't use binoculars or telescopes, Weather.com said. Though the meteors will emanate from the eastern horizon, they will streak across the entire sky and will be visible from anywhere on Earth, according to NASA.

The best time to view the shower is after midnight, when the constellation Orion rises high above the horizon. "If you can spot Orion, then get ready for some meteors," Samuhel said.

Unfortunately, the moon will be a bit of an issue this year as it will rise just after midnight on the peak night and will be around 50% illuminated, AccuWeather said.

Clouds could also cause problems for viewing the shower in the eastern and northwestern U.S., AccuWeather said, noting the best views should be in the central and southwestern parts of the country.

post-126525-0-85005600-1571693375.png

orionids radient.png   orionids viewing areas.png


Edited by Skywatcher, 21 October 2019 - 04:32 PM.

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#887 RainbowCatepillar

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 04:47 PM

SKYE! THANKS FOR SHARING THIS NEWS! I WILL BE UP ALL NIGHT TO CATCH THIS! WOOOOO!



#888 Juthro

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 07:12 PM

A cool video that I thought the star gazers here might enjoy :)

 


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#889 TVCasualty

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Posted 10 November 2019 - 10:18 AM

Those are cool, and can be really handy. I just installed one of those in my car to replace the airbags. I just hope I never get into a wreck under a bridge or in a tunnel...


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#890 Dipole

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 09:39 PM

This is all too amazing.

Science News has an article, the imaging of a pulsar, a highly magnetic, spinning neutron star.

There are spots on the southern hemisphere.

Here is a gif of what the magnetic field of a pulsar looks like:

Pulsar Magnetic Field 121719.gif

 

Now that is one funky Dipole.

But it does warm my heart as well as

blow me away that the imaging of a neutron star can be done.

 

The Event Horizon Project has produced a powerful analytical technique.

The method was discovered by a cute looking professor.

She is now at CalTech.  Sorry for being a d-bag.


Edited by Dipole, 03 January 2020 - 09:41 PM.

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#891 wharfrat

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 08:23 PM

any one else keeping a nightly eye on Betelgeuse? Orions left shoulder. apparently has been diming more than normal, which could possibly indicate it going supernova (has gone, because of light years). That would be incredible to see, would be as bright as the moon and visible during the day for a year. Here is an article from astromony.com

 

https://astronomy.co...like-from-earth

 


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#892 Skywatcher

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Posted 21 February 2020 - 09:15 AM

I have been watching Betelgeuse for the last few months. Actually for the last 20 years or more since Orion is one of my favorite constellations. I have to say for me the dimming is hard to follow since it is slow progressive. It pretty much looks the same from night to night, but my immediate reaction when I first spot it is that it looks so much dimmer. My memorie has seen this star with regularity over my life, so I have years worth of sightings. Your mind holds a picture like that, of comparative brightness to the nearby stars, so in its presently dimmer state it seems " wrong"  somehow.

 

There is now some speculation that there could be a cloud of ejected matter that is obscuring some of the stars surface.

https://www.yahoo.co...-161613810.html


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#893 Alder Logs

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Posted 21 February 2020 - 09:40 AM

I have been meaning to bring this up here, but repeatedly spacing it out.  How Betelgeuse used to rival Rigel in brightness and now doesn't is stark to my eye.  If this isn't an indicator of impermanence for us, what is?  We so easily take stuff for granted.


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#894 flashingrooster

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Posted 21 February 2020 - 05:13 PM

Its one of my favorite things to think about in space and our planet. What did our sky look like 20,000 years ago. Have past civilizations viewed such a celestial event. And what effects that would take on our spirituality and religion in the past. It's easy to forget what power that sky held for so long, and for that matter still does. 


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#895 Alder Logs

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Posted 21 February 2020 - 10:09 PM

 

...what power that sky held...

 

Read Immanuel Velikovsky's Worlds In Collision. 



#896 flashingrooster

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 02:52 PM

It sounds like an interesting idea, stuff the early solar system may have produced. But it looks to be 

a heavily criticized book based on anecdotes rather than physics. When it comes to space I trust the nerds over the mindful

 

I have to say though, reading about the controversy of the book has been interesting anyway so thanks for the recommend 


Edited by flashingrooster, 22 February 2020 - 03:05 PM.


#897 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 05:10 PM

It sounds like an interesting idea, stuff the early solar system may have produced. But it looks to be 

a heavily criticized book based on anecdotes rather than physics. When it comes to space I trust the nerds over the mindful

 

I have to say though, reading about the controversy of the book has been interesting anyway so thanks for the recommend 

 

It's a fascinating read, and there are some very compelling points raised. I'm surprised no one has tried to make a movie about what's described in it and his other books.

 

I suppose whether or not someone considers his conclusions to be true or accurate depends on how true or accurate they assume that ancient chronicles and myths were (either literally or as allegories).

 

For example, if an ancient culture had a story about major shit going down that resulted in the Sun not setting for several "days" in a row, it might be curious but dismissed as a fictional story or myth. But if you were to find that a different culture that existed at the same time but was located on the opposite side of the planet had a story about a time when the Sun did not rise for several "days" in a row, and both stories seemed to be the same age, then what would you make of it?

 

That would either be an astounding coincidence, circumstantial evidence of an unimaginably-massive event that affected the entire planet, or the biggest hoax in the history of history. He was also laughed at for his crazy predictions about the extremely high surface temperature of Venus (which was impossible to verify at the time he made his prediction), but once we developed the tech to measure it it turned out he was right. He has a few more things to say about Venus that are more than a little interesting and might explain a whole lot about the history of both the human race and the Earth itself.


Edited by TVCasualty, 22 February 2020 - 05:11 PM.


#898 flashingrooster

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 05:40 PM

Yeah I only read the Wikipedia page on the book. It seems it has gone through the ringer of scrutiny. The short version to me is sure they stories might line up to some celestial event. But what he describes makes no sense in the physical aspect of it. They quote all sorts of smart shit like newton's laws of orbits and such. Basically it can't stand on one leg scientifically. 

 

They do address some of his theories have been proven false by evidence that has arisen since it was written. See what you think about their criticisms. 

 

https://en.wikipedia...ds_in_Collision

 

 

They do make a point to say that the way he was immediately dismissed was wrong too though


Edited by flashingrooster, 22 February 2020 - 05:40 PM.


#899 TVCasualty

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 07:10 PM

I was mainly interested in the comparative mythology, and was always curious to know how accurate his descriptions of the historical accounts of the relevant myths actually were. A lot can be lost (or added) in the process of translation.

 

I once attended a performance by a group of Australian aboriginal dancers. That's how they record their history, and tell it to each other. Most of the things they were doing in the dance were baffling (growing up in the culture and being steeped in its symbolism would've probably been required to understand most of the dances). The dancing began with the Dreaming/Dreamtime (before time began) and went on to detail their creation myth, then proceeded to the present (it was a long dance). When they got to WWII and the Bombing of Darwin I sat up and started paying a LOT closer attention (I could understand what they were "saying"). Granted, there are many distinct aboriginal cultures and languages in Australia so not all tell the same stories; the tribe putting on the performance was from Northern Australia which is where the didgeridoo came from (and is where Darwin is).

 

They chronicled the Japanese bombing attack by dancing around the fire pit with arms outstretched like they were airplanes while others crouched on the ground acting like anti-aircraft guns. They danced the dropping of bombs, the shooting-down of bombers, and the death of people on the ground that resulted as well as other aspects of the attack and the war in general. It made me want to go back and watch the entire performance again since I then had a much better sense of how they depicted events in their dance. I REALLY wanted to watch the parts about the Dreaming again.

 

Australian aboriginal culture is the oldest enduring culture on the planet, tracing back ~50,000 years with evidence that their ancestors first arrived in the region thousands of years before that.

 

The first planetary catastrophe Velikovsky described supposedly took place in the 15th Century BCE, which was only just yesterday relative to the existence of Australia's indigenous tribes. I've not seen or heard mention of their dances chronicling any sort of massive global event of the type described by Velikovsky and I'd bet that it would've made at least as big of an impression as the WWII bombing of Darwin clearly had.



#900 Alder Logs

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Posted 22 February 2020 - 07:12 PM

Actually, there are volumes from some credentialed academics that show more than a couple things lining up well with the solar system he described.  The newest and most up to date is The Velikovsky Heresies, by Laird Scranton. 

 

https://www.ancient-origins.net/

 

 

The Velikovsky Heresies: Worlds in Collision and Ancient Catastrophes Revisited
Author: Laird Scranton,

A reexamination of Immanuel Velikovsky’s controversial Venus theories in light of new astronomical and archaeological findings

  • Provides new evidence from recent space probe missions to support Velikovsky’s theories on the formation of Venus
  •  
  • Presents recently translated ancient texts from China, Korea, and Japan that uphold the cometlike descriptions of Venus cited by Velikovsky
  •  
  • Examines evidence of major geomagnetic events in 1500 BCE and 750 BCE that correspond with close passes of the comet Venus and its impact with Mars
  •  
  • Offers scientific explanations for many disputed aspects of Velikovsky’s theories, such as how Venus could have transformed from a comet into an orbiting planet

Surrounded by controversy even before its publication in 1950, Immanuel Velikovsky’s Worlds in Collision introduced the provocative theory that Venus began as a brilliant comet ejected by Jupiter around 1600 BCE, wreaking chaos on Mars and Earth as it roamed through our solar system prior to settling into its current orbit. Immediately dismissed without any investigation and subject to vicious attacks, Velikovsky’s theory is now poised for reexamination in light of recent astronomical and archaeological findings.

 

Exploring the key points of Velikovsky’s theories, Laird Scranton presents evidence from recent space probe missions to show that Venus still exhibits cometlike properties, such as its atmospheric composition, and could be a young planet. Reviewing the widespread cometlike descriptions of Venus from 1500 BCE to 750 BCE as well as Velikovsky’s observation that no records of Venus exist prior to 1600 BCE, Scranton reveals recently translated ancient texts from China, Korea, and Japan that further uphold Velikovsky’s theories. Examining evidence of major geomagnetic and climate-change events around 1500 BCE and 750 BCE, corresponding with close passes of the comet Venus and its impact with Mars, the author offers scientific explanations for many disputed aspects of Velikovsky’s theories, such as how Venus transformed from a comet into an orbiting planet. By updating this unresolved controversy with new scientific evidence, Scranton helps us to understand how it was that Worlds in Collision was the one book found open on Albert Einstein’s desk at the time of his death.

 

 

While I have issues, especially when he seems to put too many events in the same narrow timeline, even Graham Hancock seems open to some Velikovsky input.

 

https://grahamhancock.com/scrantonl3/

 

http://grahamhancock...match_threads=0

 

It's interesting to me to find Laird Scranton posting on Hancock's forum, as I tried to get a dialog going with him after reading his book and failed to do so.  I will look forward to seeing his posts found in this search.


Edited by Alder Logs, 22 February 2020 - 07:20 PM.





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