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#21 Cornfield

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 08:44 PM

freaky id LOVE to see you document your garden! please do!

#22 Freaky

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 08:54 PM

:thumbup: I'll do my best to keep a running garden log up on Topia. I hope the incorporation of edible mushrooms will work out. I'm brainstorming the idea so not quite sure if it'll work or not.

#23 Hippie3

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 08:58 PM

freaky
you should never add manure to any food crop without at least 60 days for it to settle in, a real risk with manure on edibles is E. Coli.
p.s. never plant over a septic tank nor its' laterals.

#24 Freaky

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 09:06 PM

I agree Hip, we use composted manure - aged about 3-5 years from a friend. When we add it and till the garden, we wait another 3 weeks or so before planting. Didn't think my manure comment would be misleading, I should have explained better.

Our garden is about an acre away from the Septic Field. We don't plant anything around the septic field. Hip makes an important point about that!

#25 aumbrellaforainydays

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 03:44 PM

i'm getting started early. i have access to a 4 season dome that to start the young transplants.

outside, i plan to begin march 1st with some cold frames built and ready for first sowing. i am thinking kale, broccoli, peas, carrots, leeks, lettuce, mache, radicchcio, spinach, arugula, parsley, and radish for the cold frames.

inside i hope to get all my tomatoes and peppers big and strong before last frost.

once the cold frame matures i hope to move some plants outside, converting the cold frames to hardening stations.

i will be experimenting with no-till spring wheat/clover mix, reaping and threshing by hand. 1/4 acre will be my start. found a local white wheat variety and using medium red clover.

i am thinking of buying some grape cuttings, and rooting them until next spring. also i have sources of raspberry canes and hops rhizomes. so will be planting those.

as far as garden goes, i am experimenting with raised and sunken beds.
we dont rototill, but we do sheet mulch every fall. we do dig though, to incorporate all undecomposed manure/cardboard/straw thats left.
i also want to test dutch white clover and vegetables together to see how they work against weed control. aka cover crop.

sunken beds are an indigenous technique used by southwest natives where water is precious. aka waffle beds or basin beds. i believe sunken beds are underutilized in areas where rainfall is scarce. it cuts down runoff, evaporation and hand watering.

fine tuning the successional planting, as that is key for food self-sufficiency. may your garden express the spirit of the earth!

#26 tenjin

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 11:29 AM

I just rototilled up my garden plot a couple days ago, while dumping most of my compost in it. It is really only a "victory garden", as It's only about 10x12 feet in my backyard flat ground away from any trees (a lot of sunlight). I had a lift-top lid cooler full of compost outside from last year that I have added banna peels, coffee grinds, leaves and a lot of decomposed vegetables from the garden that I didn't use. It was so black and moist when I added it to the plot to be tilled in. I am in zone 7 and have started a few seeds indoors so I am ready for sure.

I planted a garden last year for the first time. I grew Blue Corn, 3 different types (Roma-Rutger-Brandywine) of Tomatoes, Yellow Squash, String Beans, Okra and three different types (Jalapeno- Cheyene-Habenero) of Hot Pepper. At the front of the garden I had Spearmint, Chamomile and Tobacco. Everything grew robust except for the squash which got ate up by millions of stink bugs (neighbors did too, which is probably where I got them). The vegetables I didn't eat I canned in mason jars in PC. I canned a lot of tomatoes and hot pepers with vinegar (pickled peppers). Mmmm.

A lot of the seeds I ordered from horizonseeds (they are by far the the cheapest for quantity, plus USDA Organic), but some I got from a gardener friend of mine and a few tomatoes seedlings from a local greenhouse. My friend has inherited his garden from his grandfather and has been planting in it since he passed. So I have learned a lot about vegetable gardening from him and how to use all organic. Most of my neighbors have vegetable gardens as well.

I'll defintely put some pics up when I get my camera.
Good Luck to all the gardeners and hope everyone has a bountiful crop!

#27 tenjin

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 11:34 AM

The only fert I used on my vegetables was Neptune's Harvest Fish & Seaweed mixed with water per the directions. And had so many tomatoes-people I would give to couldn't take anymore because they had so many, so I canned a lot too (good for spaghetti sauce or soup since becomes more liquidy when PC). Anyways Neptune's Harvest has done wonders for me.

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#28 Hippie3

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 11:37 AM

eh, way too expensive imho, ok for small plot but well composted manure works as good as any store-bought fancy bottled ferts.

#29 tenjin

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 11:47 AM

Hi there Hipp

Ya I ordered from dirtworks. I think it was about $15 for a quart :eusa_doh:
My friend doesn't use any liquid fert or anything like that..just compost/manure and his does great too, but he has a big plot so for him it wouldn't be financially sound to use stuff like this.




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